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October 31, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Two.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

QNTRACT VIOLATION:
Cinema Guild Ends
Public Advertising

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VARIED PROGRAM:

By GAIL BLUMBERG
The Cinema Guild is no longer
advertising specific program infor-
mation in The Daily, Richard En-
kelis, '65, Cinema Guild chairman,
said yesterday.
This change in advertising poli-
cy was put into effect following a
charge brought against the Cine-
ma Guild by a film production
company. The charge stated that
the Cinema Guild had broken a
clause in its rental contract by
engaging in public advertising.
Public advertising was described
as any form of advertising readily
accessible to the public at large;
The Daily, which is sold on news-
stands as well as mailed off cam-
pus, fit this description.
Non-Profit
As the Cinema Guild is classi-
fied as a non-profit agency of the
University, it receives films at a
price lower than that of the com-
mercial theatres. Because of this,
the film production companies feel
that such public advertising would
be undue competition for the com-
mercial theatres.
Following the charge, the film
productioa company forced its dis-
tributor to cancel the Guild's dis-
tribution contract. As a distributor
handles films from more than one
production company, the films
cancelled included films from oth-
er companies as well.
However, since the Cinema Guild
deals with many distributors, the
only films to be cancelled in the
near future will be "A Night at the
Opera," "An American in Paris,"
"Gigi," "The Cat People," and
"The Grapes of Wrath."
Dispensation
Immediate dispensation was ob-
tained to show "Gigi" and "Cat
People'" and "Grapes of Wrath"
were reinstated under a new con-
tract.
'The full page advertisement of

across
Campus
The 11th annual Conference on
"The Economic Outlook" will be
held today and Friday in Rack-
ham Amph.
At 8:45 p.m. today Prof. John
Lintner of Harvard University will
discuss "The Economic Outlook for
1964." He will be followed by Prof.
Harvey Brazer of the economics
department who will view "Fiscal
Policy in 1964."
At 2 p.m., Prof. Eva L. Mueller }
of the Survey Research Center
will examine "Consumer SpendingI
and the Accumulation of Liquid
Assets" and John Frechtling of
the Ford Motor Company will
speak on automobide demand.
Prof. Raymond J. Saulnier of
the Columbia University business
school will speak at 7 p.m. in the
Anderson Room of the Michigan
Union.
Conservatism...
Prof. John Clark of the engi-
neering college and vice-chairman.,
for research of the Conservative
Federation of Michigan will talk
on "Principles of Conservatism" at
8:15 p.m. today in Rms. 3-K-L of
the Michigan Union.
India...
William Archer of the Indian
Section of the Victoria and Albert
Museum of London will speak on
"Indian Painting" at 4 p.m. today
in Aud. B.
Plautus...
'je University Student Labora-
tory Theatre will present "The Pot
of Gold," a comedy by Plautus at
4:10 p.m. today in the Arena The-
atre, Frieze Building.
Manpower...
Voice Political Party will show
the UAW film, "Investment in
Manpower," a Swedish film on to-
morrow's automation, at 7:30 p.m.
today in the Multi-purpose Rm.
of the UGLI.

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ROTC Provides Military Counselling

TONIGHT at 8
ODETTA

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By JEFFREY GOODMAN
Information and counselling on4
military service matters ranging
from the draft to the Army NurseK
Program are available from thet
Army ROTC Instructor Group lo-
cated in North Hall, Lt. Col.
Thomas Harris of the military
science department said yesterday.E
Lt. Col. Harris outlined some ofk
the areas which are frequently off
concern to college students in
planning their military service.
The staff is available particularlyk
to answer students' questions. Of-
ficer's Candidate School, draft
status, direct commissions and
the nursing program are among
the areas in which guidance is{
often sought.

JOHN BINGLEY
.. . cancelled films
the back of the Aug. 27 Daily was
cited as the prime violation. But
later additional Daily ads were
mentioned. Eckelis commented,
however, that such advertising has
been going on for about five years
in the Ann Arbor News and for
an even longer time in The Daily.
Appropriate Action
Following notification of the
cancellation, a committee met with
Director of Student Affairs and
Organizations John Bingley to de-
cide upon appropriate action.
The committee then met with
the Butterfield Theatre Corpora-
tion representative in Ann Arbor,
Gerald Hoag. He informed the
committee that since no complaint
had been lodged by the firm's Ann
Arbor branch, the action might
have been the outcome of a rou-
tine inquiry from the Detroit of-
fice.

Discussing the OCS program
about which he is frequently ask-
ed, Lt. Col. Harris said that there
are now two means of entry into
this school for officers.
Leadership
A draftee or enlistee could, by
showing his leadership abilities,
be selected for OCS anywhere
from 18 months to two years after
induction. He would then spend
23 weeks in OCS and after that
be obliged to serve two years as
a second lieutenant.
"Needless to say, this method
does not appeal to the average
draftee, who would otherwise have
only a two-year obligation," Lt.
Col. Harris said.
Under a new program, however,
a man may enlist, finish OCS af-
ter a minimum of eight months
and then, as an officer, have to
fill out only the remainder of his
three-year obligation.
No ROTC
But to qualify for this method
of entrance, a candidate would
have to have a college degree
from a school without Army RO-
TC.
In regard to the draft, Lt. Col.
Harris explained that the Army
itself does not administer the
draft, and therefore would not be
qualified to give definitive advice.
He frequently explores with his
counsellees the various possibili-
ties and alternatives which draft
policy might present.
"If a man faces six years of
military service at the age of 23,
you are talking about 15 per cent
of his remaining life," Lt. Col.
Harris said. "When this much is
at stake, you have to make the
decision about service on the
basis of known facts.
Only Local Board
For this reason, only a person's
local selective service board can
be relied upon for definite infor-
mation, he said.
Lt. Col. Harris further em-
phasized that a man concerned
about his future must weigh the
benefits of being an officer against
those of being an enlisted man.
Since, even after two years of
active duty, a man can never

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know for certain that he will not
be needed in an emergency, he
must consider the reduced pay to
which he might be returning.
Under a new pay scale, officers
receive approximately three times
the salary of enlisted men. This
difference could be crucial to the
maintenance of a family, Lt. Col
Harris explained.
Probable New Crises
Lt. Col. Harris considers that
international crises will probably
recur in the future, despite the
present apparent thaw in cold
war relations. The United States
will have to meet these chal-
lenges not only with mere man-
power but also with skilled per-
sonnel.
In addition to these two areas,
Lt. Col. Harris and his staff also
offer advice on direct- commis-
sions for people with special tal-
ents of value to the Army.

NIKON and
NIKKOREX
Cameras
and
Accessories
at
FOLLETT'S
Photo Departmient

BOWEN FIELDHOUSE
E.M.U. - Ypsilanti
Tickets $1.50-$2.00
on sale at
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
RECORD CENTER
304 S. Thayer

PO

11

---W-

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

r

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"

FREEMAN MILLER
.,.. tax aid

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI N
«.y " : 1L~r. . aav :":,4r~." .::" . . ::"."," : .Yr.: e:"." .::^.:4:"r's" -""."

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31
Day Calendar
Eleventh Annual Conference on the1
Economic Outlook-Registratilon: Rack-
ham Bldg., 8 a.m.
Landscape Design Study Course 2, Se-
ries I--Mich. Union, 8:30 am.
Mental;- Health Research Seminar -
Marvin L. Minsky, Massachusetts Insti-'
tute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.,
"The Current State of On-Line Compu-
ter Operations at MIT": Main Confer-
ence Room, Mental Health Research
Institute, 2:15 to 3:45 p.m.
Cinema Guild - Tod Browning's
Dial 2-6264
a
Itm~l1 ;lii ppa11 ii
SHOWS AT 1:00-2:50
| ~ 4:50-7:00 & 9:05

"Freaks," plus three silent farce come-7
dies: Architecture Aud.: 7 p.m. and 9
p.m.1
Professional Theatre Program-Asso-
ciation of Producing Artists in "Much
Ado About Nothing": Trueblood Aud.,
8:30 p.m.
Tihe Dept. of Speech Student Labora-
toryeTheatre presents Plautus' "The
Pot of Gold" today promptly at 4:10
p.m. in the Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.
Admission is free .to all.
,..Honors Council Steering. Committee
Meeting: 1 p.m., today, 1210 Angell Hall.
Doctoral Examination for Calvin Boyd
DeWitt, Zoology; thesis; "Behavioral
Thermoregulation in the Iguanid Liz-
ard, Dipsosaurus dorsalis," today, 2111j
Natural Science Bldg., at 3 p.m. Chair-1
man, W. R. Dawson.
Doctoral Examination for William Al-]
len Peterson, Business Administration;
thesis: "An Application of a Method of
Depreciation. Accounting to Problems
of Accounting for Federal Income
Taxes with Particular Attention tol
Regulated Gas and ElectricUtilities,"
today, 816 School of Bus. Admin., at 10
a.m. Chairman, R. L. Dixon.
Dept. of Engrg. Mechanics Seminar:

Prof. James D. Murray, Harvard Univ.,
will speak on "Mathematical Aspects of
the Problem of Fluidization," Room
218, W. Engrg., today at 4 p.m. Coffee
will be served at 3:30 p.m. in the Fac-
ulty Lounge.
General Notices
Admission Test for Grad Study in
Business: Candidates taking the Ad-
mission Test for Grad Study in Busi-
ness onmNov. 2 are requested to report
to Room 130 Business Admin. Bldg. at
8:45 Sat, morning.
Applications for Fellowships and
Scholarships in the Grad School for
1964-65 are now available in depart-
mental offices. Competition closes Feb-
ruary 15, 1964. Renewal of application
forms are also available in departmen-
tal offices for those who have applied
in previous years. Only students who
intend to enroll in the Horace H. Rack-
ham School of Grad Studies for 1964-65
may apply.
Placement
NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATIONS:
The National Teacher Exams will be
held on Sat., Feb. 15, 1964, in Ann Ar-
bor. Bulletins of information contain-
(Continued on Page 5)

IRS Grants
Tax .benefit
The Internal Revenue Service
has announced that graduate stu-
dents who are research assistants
may escape income tax if their
research is used for doctoral re-
quirements.
"This may make research as-
sistantships non-taxable as are
fellowships and scholarships,"
Freeman Miller, associate dean of
the graduate school, commented.
Of the nearly 2500 research as-
sistants employed in Ann Arbor,
300 to 500 of them may be affect-
ed by this policy change, Robert
Burroughs, director of research
administration, estimated.
The estimate is based on the
fact that last year more than 300
doctoral candidates were research
assistants and used their research
in theses.
Two federal tax court rulings
were responsible for the change
in the Internal Revenue Service's
policy. In one case, a student at
New York University won a tax
exemption although she did the
research work before she decided
to use it for doctoral requirements.
"This strong ruling seems sig-
nificant because the student was
working under conditions of em-
ployment that are similar to con-
ditions here," Burroughs com-
mented.
Soon after these rulings, gradu-
ate students began applying to
the Internal Revenue Service for
refunds on their assistantship in-
comes.

School Boards
SeeK Support
With Petitions
Ten Washtenaw County school
boards recently took the first step
toward a county community col-
lege.
The boards agreed to circulate
petitions requesting that the coun-
ty be made a community college
district. The petitions will then
be sent to the state superintendent
of public instruction.
In Washtenaw County, four out
of ten high school seniors and re-
cent graduates expressed interest
in further training but could not
afford it, according to Prof. Ray-
mond J. Young of the education
school and director of the com-
munity college study.
Employers have to draw from
outside the county for a signifi-
cant number of semi-professional
and technical level personnel.
To end this practice, the school
would consist of a two year liberal
arts program combined with vo-
cational instruction.

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Starting
FRIDAY

cA!rmu=T

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Coming
FRIDAY

The wonderful, wonderful story of Mary, Mary,
who said..."Let's not start something
in a cab we can't finish
}J' on 44th Street."
Staring
LBIfey~noLDS
BARRYNELSON DIANE McBAINndMICHA.EL E
t TECHNIILR @
A MER'Iyt(iN ROY PrOduction Screenplay by RICHARD L BREEN' Directed by MERVYN LEROY 8
Based on the Stage Play by JEAN KERR -Produced on the Stage by ROGER STEVENS Fn WMER BRS.
Attention "Live" Theatre Patrons. Here is a real treat for those who
enjoy Little Theatre Group Shows. "Mary, Mary," a splendid stage hit in
New York City, is now on our giant motion picture screen. We recommend
that you see it from the beginning.

louis armstrong
HOMECOMING CONCERT

®!

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An Entertainment Event
Of Unsurpassed- Beauty!
" + ,
_DISNEY'S -
with.
:: 'SIOKOWSKI .t
and the Philadelphia Orchestra
' TiEc lmrn "

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STANDING ROOM TICKETS
ON SALE THURS. at 1 :00 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM $1.00

C alLLL 'lJ

DIAL 8-6416
Shows Today at 7-9 P.M.

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"A Cinema Collector's Item
cmost unusual film, a very
raething indeed..., omed
are coe
from p@Ig-d-"
*Crowther
N.Y. Times M

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Ends Tonight
C' DIAL
5-6290
"Stunning performance!
Leslie Caron imbues it with
tremendous compassion
and charm."
-New York Times

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