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October 29, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-29

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'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1963

THE MCHIGN DAIY T~SDAY.OCTOER 29 t9A

Kovach, Rao Interpret Performances

Observes Future Need
For Amending Charter

By GAIL BLUMBERG
"We have tried to combine the
color and entertainment of native
Hungarian dance with classical
ballet to produce something new
which will appeal to an American
audience," Hungarian ballet dan-
cer Nora Kovach said recently.
Miss Kovach and her 'husband
Istvan Rabovsky starred in the
Hungarian Ballet's "Bihari," seen
Sunday at Rackham Aud.
Most Hungarian folk companies
are amateur, Miss Kovach con-
tinued. "Although they are won-
derfully spirited, we hoped to pro-
vide the authentic dance on a
more professional level.
Change Plans
"We had to change our plans as
it is extremely hard to find Hun-
garian dancers who have had a
ballet .training," she noted.
Miss Kovach and Rabovsky are.
themselves free Hungarians who
performed with the Leningrad
Ballet until their defection to
West Berlin in 1953.
"The Russian dance training is
generally more strenuous than
the American, because they have
more money to spend through
government support." Thus the
dancer can be more devoted to his
profession than in ,this country,
Miss 'Kovach noted.
More Aware
"The Russian people are more
aware of the arts than are Ameri-
cans, primarily because they have
more of an artistic education. We
have a broader range of enter-
tainment inshows,hmovies and.
television here, so that there is
not yet the interest in ballet and
music," Miss Kovach explained.
Furthermore, the Russian ballet
has a long tradition which has
not yet come to American dance,
she added.
Cultural exchange is a good
thing for the development of the
dance. There are many things
that Russian dancers can learn
from the American dance, Miss
Kovach said.
It is of utmost importance that
the United States government of-
fer more aid, because money is
needed before any real develop-
ment can take place, she added.
Although this is the first tour

SHANTA RAO
.. .Indian dancer

KOVACH, RABOVSKY
... ballet stars

In order to provide space for
students to park their cars, the
Student Government Council has
leased and is selling the use of
the 110 parking spaces on the
top floor of the Thompson St.
parking structure and has ar-
ranged for the conversion of staff
parking lot W-7 into a metered
student-faculty lot.
In addition it has opened, until
this spring, two dirt lots, W-3
and W-4, to students for free
parking and the Coliseum for
daily, non-storage, parking at no
charge.
It is possible to purchase per-
mits for spaces now in the park-
ing structure for $10 for this
season in the automobile regula-
tions office. These were formerly
acquired from the Student Driver'
Regulations Office for $15 apiece.
SGC is subsidizing five dollars of
the cost. If all spaces are sold
the Council intends to lease a
second floor in the parking struc-
ture and rent them also.
Parking facilities in lot W-7,
located on Thompson St. near E.
Williams St., will be open in
approximately two'weeks for all
registered cats.
SGC is also investigating the
possibilities of building a parking
structure just for students, but
such an action is about five years
in the future, SGC President Rus-
sell Epker, '64BAd, said.

for the Hungarian Ballet's "Bi-
hari," Miss Kovach and Rabovsky
have travelled extensively with a
program of classical ballet.
The University provides a mar-
velous audience, Miss Kovach said,
"I like to perform before young
people, because they are so sin-
cere and enthusiastic in their re-
ception. I would like to do a tour
strictly for students at some time,"
she said.
Miss Kovach and Rabovsky
danced in a program which was
a mixture of classical ballet with
the native dances of Hungary, ac-
companied by a gypsy instru-
mental ensemble.
The unique Hungarian instru-
ment, the cymbalum, a wire-
strung instrument played with
mallets, was used in a sole role
during the dance performance.

By ROBERT HIPPLER
"Every change in the functions
of the United Nations thus far
has been by evolution, without
amendment to the original char-
ter," Mrs. Marion McVitty noted
author and lecturer, said Satur-
day at the Friends Meeting House,
during a conference of the United
World Fedelarists.
"Eventually, however, amend-
ment to the charter, not practic-
able today, will be necessary. Un-
til then a plan of transition be-
tween evolution and amendment
is the key to continued success
of the United Nations in weather-
ing the winds of change," she
said.
Mrs. McVitty was the principal
speaker at the regional fall con-
ference of the United World Fed-
eralists and is the accredited ob-
server at the UN for the World
Association of Federalists.
'Police Functions'
'The recent impartial 'police
functions' of the UN, such as those
in the Suez and the Congo, along
with the responsible parts played
by new members, notably Tunisia
and Morocco, have been the pri-
mary successes of the UN in deal-
ing with changing world ondi-
tions," she noted.
The United World Federalists is
an organization which seeks im-
plementation of the United States
long term foreign policy goal of
development of rule of law among
nations, with the United ,Nations
serving as a framework for a
federation of independent and
sovereign nations,
"A good plan of transition for
the UN could be based on a recent
proposal by the Nordic nations
concerning the race problem in
the Union of South Africa," Mrs.
McVitty continued.
Favored Sanctions
"This proposal would apply
widely favored sanctions en eco-
nomic and military aid to South
Africa, but. would also have a
positive side-it would assure the
South African white that if they
agreed to end their discrimina-
tion, an importial UN police force
would be deployed, insuring the
protection of the rights of all in-
dividuals, Negro and white alike,"
she said. ,
"The Nordic plan, which would
tailor UN forces preparatory to
crisis, could lead to a transitional
agreement giving the United Na-
tions the power-for 3 to 6 months
at a time, in' anticipation of or
during crises-to forcefully deal
with individuals impeding UN ac-
tion," Mrs. McVitty said.
It would also "block outside
arms flowing in, tending to cause
or further a crisis," she noted.
"Such powers would have been
useful before and during the Con-
go crisis."'
Transition
"The transitional action would
serve the UN until a charter
amendment could be passed creat-
ing a standing police force. Such
a force is impracticable now be-
cause of financial and political
disagreements among member na.
tions."
Mrs McVitty added that "the
fact that UN troops were impartial
in both the 1957 Suez and 1960
Congo crises could be instrumen-
tal in allaying the fears of enough
nations to pass both the Nordic
and transitional plans."

The Suez and Congo actions are
in contrast to the guardian-of-
the-oppressed efforts that dom-
inated the Korean War crisis. In
those two crises, unlike Korea, the
UN tried principally to pacify both
sides, create law and order in the
country, and work out a settle-
ment, she commented.
Level-Headed
"Other sources of confidence
have been the level-headed guid-
ance of the Tunisian and Moroc-
can delegations during the' Congo
crisis, and the wisdom shown by
the African nations in not boy-
cotting the UN General Assembly
in the -midst of the furor over
South Africa's racial policies.
These are characteristic of the
commendable actions that have
been taken by the newly admitted
countries in recent years," Mrs.
McVitty said.
Other speakers at the confer-
ence were William Bethea, na-
tional director of the United
World Federalists, Walter H.
Grossfeld, chairman of the Detroit
chapter and Mrs. Judith Reynolds,
member of the Federalist executive
council.
Bethea spoke on the workings
of the United World Federalist
lobbies in Washington. "Principal
duties of the lobbies are to con-
tact newspapers, television and
radio stations and magazines by
means of continual letters and
press releases," he said.
Crucial Issues
"Lobbies also act to stimulate
letters to Washington concerning
crucial issues. Letters to the Cap-
itol give congressmen an idea of
what the concerns are back home,"
Bethea added.
Grossfeld gave emphasis to the
potential power of the individual
in making know and taking action
on his views. "Active participation
in organizations supporting your
opinion, as well as letters to the
editor and to congressmen, are
ways of making your presence
felt," he noted.
"If you funnel your energies into
the field of interest to you, the
results can be very gratifying."
Speaking of the growing influ-
ence of the United World Federal-
ists on Capital Hill, Mrs. Reynolds
noted that "the actions of our
lobbies inWashington and across
the country were very important
in the passage in Congress of the
$100 million UN bond issue, as
well as in theUSenate ratification
of the test ban treaty."
The regional fall conference,
which was open to the public,
was attended by United World
Federalist members from Michi-
gan and Indiana, as well as by
a contingent of students.
Debate Teams
Take . Trophies
University debate teams won
second and third place in an eight
college tournament held Friday
and Saturday at East Lansing.
The .second place trophy was
won by the varsity squad and
third place was taken by the nov-
ice squad. Michigan State Uni-
versity, hosts of the tournament,
won first place.

#EN CHMI41TING
CAPTIVAT N G

...- __
', '
: "-

I IT

aCHAS GRACIASP!
- TERRY, N. Y. Herald Tribune

STUDENTS & FACULTY
for a Horrifying Halloween
call
662-8871
for information
FC

I,

t I

following its sensational Broadway
engagement and spectacular coast-to-coast tour!

0o

I

BALLET
FOLILORI CD
0FMEXiCO

Across CampusR

Prof. Millard Cates, tenor, and
Prof. Eugene' Bossart, pianist, both
of the music school will give a
concert on Brahms' songs at 8:30
p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
Hall. Prof. Philip Duey, also of.
the music school, will narrate.

Russian Circle and the Russian
department.
There will be a 25 cent admis-
sion charge, and refreshments will
be served. The Russian Circle is
a group composed of students in-
terested in the Soviet Union and
taking the Russian language.,

Directed & Choreographed by AMALIA HERNANDEZ
General Supervision CELESTINO GOROSTIZA
COMPANY OF 75
"TERRIFICO! WE WERE ENCHANTED!"
-COLEMAN, N. Y. Mirror
"A SPECTACULAR EVENING! Truly a
Mexican Fiesta. For the music alonethe
Ballet Folklorico is worthwhile. For the
dancing,IT IS THE TREAT OF THE DECADE!"
--BIANCOLLI, N. Y. WorldTelegram & Sun
"A JOYOUS SIGHT TO BEHOLD!"
- HERRIDGE, N. Y. Po
FRI, NOV. 1, 8:30
HILL AUDITORIUM
Limited number of Tickets available at:
$4.00-$3 50-$3 00-$2.25-$1 .50
at
University Musical Society, Burton Tower

Negro Compensatio.. MUSKET.

I

A two-man panel, composed of
Prof. Robert Harris of the' Law
School and Prof. Leon Mayhew of
the sociology department will dis-
cuss the topic of special compen-
sation for Negroes at 6:45 p.m.
today in the Mary Markley lounge.
The program is co-sponsored by
Markley Residence and the Stu-
dent Government Council's Hu-
man Relations Board.
Statistics Colloquium ...
Prof. William J. Wrobleski of
the business administration school
will address the business adminis-
tration school statistics collo.quium
at 4 p.m. today in Rm. 171 Busi-
ness Administration Bldg. He will
speak on "The Statistical Estima-
tion of Coefficients in Systems of
Interdependent Stochastic Equa-
tions."
Personal Morality . .
Prof. Paul Stirling of the Lon-
don.School of Economics and Poli-
tical Science will speak at 4:15.
p.m. today in Aud. D on "Im-
partial Rules and Personal Moral-
Russian Films,.
The films, "Peoples of the So-
viet Union" and "Russian Life
Today," will be; presented at 8
p.m. today in Rm. 2050 of the
Frieze Bldg. The program is part
of a film series sponsored by the

Tickets for this year's MUSKET
performances will be on sale at
the Michigan Union until Nov. 1.
They will also be sold from-Nov.
3-9 at the Mendelssohn Theatre.
The show, "The Boyfriend," will
be presented from Nov. 6-9.
Greek Archaeology . .
Bernard Ashmole of Oxford
University and the American In-
stitute of Archaeology will speak
on "Greek Votive Reliefs" at 4
p.m. today in Aud. B.

FI

......

DIAL 8-6416
ENDS TONIGHT
3 ..FAD LES
LESLIE ARON OF LOVE
Lo ..-Rom -OHW A AzNAvu
ONE DAY ONLY-WEDNESDAY
FAMOUS CLASSICS SERIES
"DAVID COPPERFIELD"

THURS., Oct. 31-8 P.M.
BOWEN FIELDHOUSE
E.M.U. - Ypsilanti
Tickets $1.5.0-$2.00
on sale at
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
RECORD CENTER
304 S. Thayer'

I

E

THE ROARiNG TWENTIES IN 1963
'63 SKIDOO yWii Lt/
Friday night let's all .: .$f I .
7:30 PARADE from Union x :.: y t
(band, cheerleaders)
8:00 PEP RALLY, Ferry FieldyF4
(Bump, Joe O'Donnell,
Dean Bingley, Dr. Losh)
8:30 YELL LIKE HELL CONTEST
(including bonfire)
n_ ^n r- 1 r3 r-iA 1 ,VC n1 \ Iik F% I .'I' aA.

Hof brau Haus
(Old Schwaben Inn)
215 S. Ashley
COED NIGHTS
WEDNESDAYS
BEGINNING Oct. 30
9:30-10:30 P.M.

, ENTERTAINMENT
Will roll out the barrel

HAL BERGER AT ORGAN
Will have a barrel of fun!

See you there-Your Host:

Eric Teller

ITSI LNE

'IAL
5-6290

I
I

"Stunning performance,
Leslie Caron imbues it with
tremendous compassion
and charm."
-New York Times

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