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October 22, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

De Cler Tells Dutch Methods

CORNELIS DE CLER
... plans cities
COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
To Hit Limit
At California
BERKELEY-University of Cali-
fornia officials reported recently
that 1000 or more qualified stu-
dents will be denied admission to
the Berkeley campus next fall be-
cause the school will have reached
its capacity.
It will mark the first time in
history that students might face
disqualification even though they
meet the academic requirements.
* * *
RALEIGH,, N. C.-North Caro-
lina State of the University of
North Carolina at Raleigh has re-
ceived a National Institutes of
Health grant of over $2 million
for an extensive study of the ap-
plication of mathematical genetics
to the study of inheritance.
The project will include theore-
tical studies using mathematical
hypotheses describing the nature
of the action of genes and the
testing of these theories in a wide
range of experimental studies.
* * *
SEATTLE--Due to unexpected
increases in enrollment this fall,
University of Washington officials
reported recently that the univer-
sity is faced with a critical deci-
sion in maintaining the quality of
education while providing for the
needs of the additional students.
The university's current budget
is based on an estimated enroll-
ment of 19,800 students in the au-
tumn quarter, but present indica-
tions show that the figure will
reach 21,000 before long.
In addition to the day school
enrollment, there are approximate-
ly 5100 students registered in eve-
ning classes.

Regents Set
New Ranks
For Faculty
The Regents approved appoint-
ments, retirements and leaves of
absence at their monthly meeting
Friday.
Prof. Edward M. Anthony, asso-
ciate professor of English, was ap-
pointed acting director of the
English Language Institute, effec-
tive Aug. 18, replacing Albert
Marckwardt. Among his assign-
ments has been the directorship
of the Southeast Asia Regional
English Project which he headed
for three years beginning in 1959.
Sydney Chapman, to be ap-
pointed senior research scienjst,
Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy, and visiting lecturer of phys-
ics and mathematics, effective
Oct. 1, for a two-month period.
He has held University appoint-
ments on six previous occasions
beginning in 1953. He holds ap-
pointments on the research staff
of the High Altitude Observatory
at Boulder, Colo., and as a visit-
ing professor and advanced scien-
tific director at the Geophysical
Institute of the University of
Alaska.
George Jackson Eder, to be ap-
pointed research .associate and
visiting lecturer in business ad-
ministration, effective Nov. 1. He
is a research associate in law and
senior editor of the World Tax
Series at Harvard University.
Appoint Visiting Professor
Prof. Mark S. Massel, to be ap-
pointed visiting professor of law
and business administration, ef-
fective with the second semester,
1963-64. Since 1958 he has been a
member of the senior staff of
Brookings Institute.
Maj. William G. Roberts, to be
appointed assistant professor of
military science, effective Sept. 17.
A committee appointment was
Dr. James R. Hayward to a three-
year term on the executive com-
mittee of the dental school effec-
tive Nov. 1, succeeding Dr. Paul
Gibbons.1
Resignations
Prof. Jere E. Goyan of the phar-
macy school resigned effective
Aug. 17 to accept a position at the
University of California.
Prof. F. Rand Morton of the
romance language department to
resign effective Jan. 15, to accept
a consulting position with a uni-
versity in Japan.
Prof. Paul A. Srere of the chem-
istry department effective Sept. 1,
to accept a position with the Uni-
versity of California.
Deaths
Memoirs of Prof. Richard Hall
Jennnings of the architecture and
design college and Prof. Philip
Munro Northrop of the dental
school, who both died on Sept.
28, were accepted by the Regents.

CAROLINGIAN RENAISSANCE:
Wolff Ascribes Success
To European Cooperation

By JOHN WEILER
Whatever-the merits of the Car-
olingian Renaissance, they are to
be ascribed to the international
cooperation that prevailed at the
time throughout Western Europe,
Prof. Philippe Wolff of the Uni-
versity of Toulouse said yesterday.
Prof. Wolff said that the mid-
Eighth century nations were un-
derdeveloped agriculturally, so-
cially and culturally. There was a
general lack of security due to
barbaric and Islamic invasions of
Europe, the Byzantine reconquest
by Justinian and a gradual de-
cline of the Roman administra-
tive system. Yet the cooperation
that prevailed was able to over-
come these adverse factors.
Favorable Factors
Prof. Wollf noted the presence
of several favorable factors which
aided the growth of the Renais-
sance. These factors included a
rich cultural heritage, both lit-
erary and legal, especially in the
Mediterranean area.
There was an absense of the
spirit of nationalism which might
across
Campus
Prof. Lewis Jones of the race
relations department of Fiske Uni-
versity will speak at noon today
on "Research on Adjustment
Problems of Negro Youth in the
Changing South" in Rm. 5615
Haven Hall.
Assimilation . .
Prof. Eric Stein of the Law
School will speak at 12:30 p.m.
today at a colloquium sponsored
by the Center for Research on
Conflict Resolution in the Kala-
mazoo Rm. of the Michigan
League. He will discuss "Prelim-
inary Thoughts on the Assimila-
tion of Laws as a Function of
European Integration."
West Africa . .
Prof. Henry Bretton of the poli-
tical science department will speak
on "Common Values and Cultural
Change in West Africa" at 4 p.m.
in the Multipurpose Rm. of the
UGLI His appearance is spon-
sored by the International Student
Association culture committee.
Satch * .
Block tickets for the Louis
Armstrong Homecoming Concert
Nov. 2 go on sale at the Hill Aud.
box office today.

have hindered the diffusion of a
universal religion centered in
Rome. This religion, based on
scriptures, established schools at
monastaries and nurneries where
the clergy was trained.
This resulted in a decree issued
in 789 for schools to be opened
in every monastary. Although this
decree never bore widespread re-
sults, it was significant as a re-
flection of his intentions.
Books
Books were needed and this
necessitated the development of
a clear handwriting. In the
Carolingian Renaissance period a
handwriting was developed whose
influence may be noted today. In
order to maintain the schools
many copies of books were needed.
The task of copying the necessary
books was a "tremendous job,"
Prof. Wolff commented.
As there were no significant
French scholars at this time,
Charlemagne had to import many.
These included Peter of Pisa, Dia-
conus and Alcuin of York. Alcuin,
the most important of these, de-
voted himself for 12 years to
Charlemagne and his work.
ThehCarolingian Renaissance
was the period in which many
Latin works were copied and in
this way preserved. The final ac-
complishment was the develop-
ment of a text of the Bible ac-
ceptable to different nationalities,
Prof. Wolff said.
Prof. Wolff concluded that the
cultural unity of this period in
history is significant because it
has persisted throughout Western
Europe to the present day.

RIXIE
DUN ULT

RALEIGH
FREJUS

BEAVER'S BIKE

605 CHURCH ST.

NO 5-6607

DIMENSION
ON SALE
WEDNESDAY
STUDENT PUBLICATION
OF
ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

ANN ARBOR'S
10-SPEED BICYCLE
HEADQUARTERS
for

r
MN
t
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it
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APA'
"Sheer
By Ted Ranc
(News Drama
"Phoenix" and "S
evening of sheer de
Without a messa
out a care for literE
the fun-loving Al
both by making its
classically uproariou
Laughter chased1
tury away, and we
an impish adieu a
lightly into Fry's
and Moliere's Gall
simply and purely
selves,
In the tomb, th]
nary performances
subtle, mock-hypoc
of "A Phoenix Too F
Fry's more obvious,
irrepressil le zest for
a whole ,of strangf
TRUEBL.OOD s
THEATRE Seats

"S$CAPIN" and
"PHOENIX"
THE ANN ARBOR NEWS
ri B
*Delight'
r,
Font, Jr.
,Critic amusement that alternated from
sly sophistic digs to slapstick and
capin are an back again like fighting.
ge and with- An exquisite sparseness in the
ary crusading, touch of director Stephen Porter
PA respected complemented the vigor of the
s two classics three players to make the whole
s a robusetly restrained gem of
the 20th cen- slightly earth-colored fun that
all waved it left us wanting more.
s we tripped Changing his mood completely
Roman tomb in the second half of the, pro-
licized Naples gram, Porter gave "Scapin" a
to enjoy our- reading broad enough to have
sent even Moliere into howling
re extraordi- raptures.
blended the Poles apart in their treatment
ritical humor of humor, the juxtaposed plays of
Frequent" with the Professional Theatre Program
jests and his double bill have in common bril-
life to create liant acting and direction and
e beauty and overflowing fun.
FRI. 8:30
SSAT. 8:30
Now at Box Office (Ma.

." ..".":.:::. :r r.. ...A V.. '..N '... . ..*..:.... . ..S"Y X$: ri:. "
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLTI
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity ",of Michigan. for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar No. 100-Dr.
Martin L. Shotzberger, Dean, Univ. Col-
lege, Univ. of Richmond, and" Harry M.
Doud, Jr., Assistant Superintendent of
Salaried Personnel Relations, Western
Electric Company, "Effective Super-
vision of Office and Technical People":
Third Floor Conference Room, Mich.
Union, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Dr. Giorgio Forti, Insti of Botanical
Science, Univ. of Milan, Italy, will speak
on Tues., Oct. 22, at 4:00 p.m. in M6423
Med. Sci. Bldg. Entitled "On the Func-
tion of Cytochrome f in Photosynthetic
Electron Transport." Coffee will be
served in the Biological Chem. Lib.,
M5410 at 3:30 p.m.
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Nov. 15. Communi-
cations for consideration at this meet-
ing must be in the President's hands
not later than Nov. 1.
Sports and Dance-Women - Women
students who have completed the phy-
sical education requirement who wish
to register electively may do so in Bar-
bour Gym (main floor) on Thurs., and
Fri., Oct. 24 and 25. Registration hours
are 8 a.m. to 11:45 a~m.
Graduate Record Exam Aptitude Test:
candidates taking the Grad. Record
Exam on Oct. 26 are requested to re-
port to 168 Frieze Bldg. at 8:45 Sat.
morning.

Professional Qualification Test: Can-
didates taking the Professional Quali-
fication Test on Oct. 26 are requested
to report to Room 130 Business admin.
Bldg. at 8:45 Sat. morning.
Foreign Visitors
Following are the foreign visitors pro-
grammed through the International
Center who will be on campus this week
on the dates indicated. Program ar-
rangements are being made by Mrs.
Clifford R. Miller,, Ext. 3358, Interna-
tional Center.
Mr. Anant R. Kamat, Prof. of Sta-
tistics, Gokhale Institute of"Politics and
Economics, Poona, India, Oct. 17-24,
1963.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Alpha Phi Omega, Pledge Meeting.
Oct. 22, 7 p.m., 3545 SAB.
Circle Recognition Society, Meeting,
Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m., League, Cave Room.
German Club, Coffee Hour-German
Conversation, Music, Singing, Oct. 23,
3-5 p.m., 4072 FB. Refreshments. "Herz-
lich Willkommen!"

Mr. M. L. Chideya, Administrative As-
sistant, World Council of Christian Edu-
cation, New York City, N.Y., U.S.A. Oct.
22-23, 1963.
Miss Maria R. M. Leal, Assistant Prof.
of Education Psychology, University
of Lisbon, Director, Society for the Pro-
tection of Underprivileged Children,
Lisbon, Portugal, Oct. 23-31, 1963.
Placement
TEACHER PLACEMENT
The Newark Teacher Exams will be
held on Friday, Nov. 29, 1963, in Newark,
N.J. Written exams will be held for po-
sitions in the following fields: Kinder-
garten, Elem., Secondary, Special Ed.,
Social Worker, Psychologist, Industrial,
Technical, & Vocational subjects. The
final date for filling application for
examination is Nov. 4, 1963.
For additional information, contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
663-1511, Ext. 3547.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau of
Appointments-Seniors & grad students,
(Continued on Page 5)
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