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October 22, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,'Russia autions
U.S. on Proposal
Statement Claims Planned A-Force
May Hurt Negotiations for Peace
MOSCOW (P)-The Soviet Union sharply cautioned the United
States and its allies yesterday that the proposed multi-nation nuclear
defense force threatens to hinder progress in East-West peace nego-
tiations.
A statement by Tass, almost within hours after the return to
Moscow of Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev from vacation, was thrust
most severely at Wept Germany, which would be part of the Western
"force. The statement was so stern

TROOP REDUCTION:
Move Heightens Speculation

WASHINGTON (P-The Army
said yesterday it will beef up the
atomic firepower of its overseas
units, thus adding fuel to specula-
tion that there may be a reduction
of United States forces abroad.
The Army announcement said
ground farces in Europe and the
Far East will be equipped with
additional units of Sergeant mis-
siles, an improved type of Honest
John rocket, and larger numbers
of atomic warheads for eight-inch
howitzers.
The announcement came on the
heels of a statement last week by
Deputy Secretary of Defense Ros-
well L. Gilpatric predicting "a
series of evolutionary changes in
the composition and disposition"
of United States forces overseas.
Launch Troop Ferry
And today the Defense Depart-
ment launches exercise Big Lift in
which a division of United States
soldiers will be ferried from Texas

U.S. To End
Aid to Corps
WASHINGTON (P)-The State
Department said yesterday the
United States will give no more
aid to an elite corps of Viet-
namese airborne troops until they
are assigned/to field duty against
Communist guerrillas.
In addition to military assist-
ance, these forces have been re-
ceiving about $300,000 a month
in extra pay from the United
States Central Intelligence Agency
for special anti-guerrilla warfare.
Commanded by Col. Le Quang
Tung under the top leadership of
Ngo Dinh Nhu, the corps was
placed on special duty in August,
and led the government raids
against Buddhist pagodas.
United States officials said that,
while the special forces were given
their bonus pay in September for
duty in August, there have been
no further payments to units as-
signed to Saigon instead of the
war front.
World News
Roundup',,
By The Associated Press
BEIRUT - Lebanon yesterday
charged Syria with aggression,
reinforced its frontier forces and
ordered them to fire at any in-
filtrators from Syria. The shoot
to kill order came after four Leb-
anese soldiers died in weekend
clashes between Syrian and Leb-
anese border patrols.
* *
TRUNG LAP, Viet Nam-A task
force of more than 400 Vietnamese
troops and their American ad-
visors failed yesterday to trap 800
Viet Cong guerrillas only 25 miles
north of Saigon. Three govern-
ment troops were killed and 15,
including an American sergeant,
were wounded in the action. The
number of Viet Cong casualties
was not known.
WASHINGTON - The United
States has discussed providing
equipment for two additional In-
dian mountain divisions but no
firm decision to do so has been
made,State Department Press Of-
ficer Robert J. McCloskey' dis-
closed yesterday. Indian officials
indicated over the weekend that
the United States had agreed to
increase the number of newly-
equipped Indian mountain divi-
sions from six to eight, while
United States aid officials denied
any firm commitments had- been
made.
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy laid the groundwork
yesterday for an eventual decision
on the tariff cuts to be sought by
the United States at international
negotiations next year. He issued
a list of products, including almost
all imported commodities, which
will be considered for possible
tariff cuts. The negotiations will
be carried out in Geneva under
the auspices of the general agree-
ment on tariffs and trade (GATT).
NEW YORK - The New York
Stocks Exchange climbed to a new
high yesterday as the Dow Jones
averages showed 30 industrials up
1.71, 20 railroads up .10, 15 utili-
ties down .05 and 65 stocks up .37.

in tone that it made Western dip-
lomats here re-examine the sig-
nificance of recent fresh hin-
drances on the Berlin autobahn,
of United States and British troop
convoys, and the even more re-
cent grumble of Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko that
East-West disarmament negotia-
tions were not going well.
Diplomats
Diplomats were inclined earlier
to treat the delays of British and
American troops as a local com-
mander's decision that had to be
supported by higher authorities to
avoid loss of face.
Not only did the Soviet Union
warn that East-West talks would
be harmed by development of the
nuclear force under the North At-
lantic Treaty Organization, but it
added that such a program would
make the Soviet Union step up its
own defense measures.
Leading Circles
The official Soviet news agency's
statement said:
"The Soviet leading circles na-
turally cannot but consider dan-
gerous consequences of West Ger-
man access to nuclear weapons, in
whatever form, and take into
consideration the need to insure
the safety of the Soviet Union and
its allies in this event.",
- The nuclear force idea was put
forward by President John F. Ken-
nedy in mid-December during a
meeting at Nassau with Harold
Macmillan, then prime minister of
Britain. Its aim was to modernize
NATO's military punch in the
dawn of the era of push-button
nuclear war.

U THANT
..mediation

.Border War
Not Settled
UNITED NATIONS W/P-Algeria

be reduced. One method of off-
setting a numerical reduction in
soldiers would be to increase the
total firepower of the forces re-
maining.
Should Be Reduction
Former President Dwight D.
Eisenhower said yesterday that
during his eight years in the
White House he believed there
should be a reduction of American
strength as soon as the European
economy permitted. But, Eisen-
UN Rejects
Chinese Bid
UNITED NATIONS (P) - The
General Assembly rejected by a
substantial margin yesterday a
new bid to seat Red China in the
United Nations.
The vote on the Albanian-
Cambodian proposal was 41 in
favor, 57 against and 12 abstain-
ing. Ethiopia was absent.
Last year the vote was 56
against and 42 in favor with the
same number of abstentions. There
were some switches in position this
year but nothing that showed any
trend. It was the 14th time that
the assembly either rejected or
sidetracked Peking's admission.
Adlai E. Stevenson, the chief
United States delegate, told a re-
ported afterward the United States
"is very pleased by the vote."
Britain, Denmark, Finland, Nor-
way and Sweden were in the yes
column as usual, along with many
Asian-African members.

hower said, at that time the mat-
ter was "too delicate a political
question to raise."
Gilpatric, in his weekend speech
in Chicago, said that "for the
foreseeable future" the United
States would maintain both large
overseas deployments and signifi-
cant capabilities to reinforce with
rapidity.
But, he added, "some shifts in
the form our military presence has
taken in recent decades are be-
ginning to be practical." He com-
mented that exercise Big Lift
"will demonstrate our ability to
project our military power far
more quickly over far larger dis-
tances than has ever been the case
in the past."

students!!-
Going Home for the Holidays?
COMPARE THE FARE!
New York Central Offers a 25% Reduction
from Regular Fares on Round Trip Coach
Tickets to Specified Destinations.
SPECIAL ROUND TRIP
THANKSGIVING AND CHRISTMAS-
NEW YEAR HOLIDAY FARES
Chicago, III....$17.65
Ann Arbor to- Gary, Ind.......15.65
Niles, Mic h... 11.00

f

II I

Ems

and Morocco, with thousands of to Europe within three days. OneI

men massed at disputed points
along their 700-mile border, both
insisted yesterday they wanted
peace but charged each other with
aggression and said they would
not agree to a cease-fire unless
certain preconditions were met.
Ahmed Taibi Benhima, chief of
the Morocco permanent delega-
tion, said his country would hold
two disputed border posts at Tin-
joub and Hassi Beida and would
not agree to a cease-fire unless
Algeria negotiated the ownership
of the vague border areas.
M'Hammed Yazid, personal rep-
resentative of Algeria's President
Ahmed Ben Bella, said a cease-
fire would not be accepted until
the Moroccans "return to their
territory" from the controversial
border posts.
Both talked with Secretary-
General U Thant over the week-
end. Benhima said Morocco would
welcome good offices mediation by
Thant to supplement that being
attempted by Ethiopia's Emperor
Haile Selassie. Yazid declined to
comment on his talk with Thant
and said he would not jeopardize
mediation developments here by
commenting on what Algeria
thinks about them.

aim is to demonstrate this na-
tion's ability to quickly reinforce
United States forces overseas.
But an equally important ob-
jective could be a demonstration
to United States allies of the
feasibility of defending this na-
tion's commitments with fewer
troops abroad, relying more on the
quick dispatch of United States-
)ased troops to foreign trouble
spots.
Equipping United States troops.
with more modern weapons will
allow withdrawal of the older line"
of Corporal and Lacrosse missiles
and the 280-millimeter cannon, in
use by the Army for about a
decade.
Increase in Might
The brief announcement said
"this program, which the United
States has discussed with its allies,
will produce an over-all increase
in the quality and quantity of ar-
tillery firepower."
It is normal for the United
States to consult with allied na-
tions into which it is sending or
increasing atomic arms.
But this discussion may have
touched on another point-a sug-
gestion that American military
manpower stationed abroad should

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21.10
25.90
29.801
32.35
37.50
43.75
45.10
52.25

Tickets Will Be Sold for Use on Trains Leaving Ann Arbor
THANKSGIVING
Going Nov. 26-27-28. Return Limit Dec. 3
CHRISTMAS-NEW YEAR
Going Dec. 18 thru 21. Return Limit Jan. 17
(Ticket Will Not Be Honored in Sleeper Coaches'or Standard Sleepers)
Convenient Train Service East and West
Call NO 2-3131
NEW YORK CENTRAL SYSTEM
ROAD TO THE FUTURE

AVIATION. INC.
Municipal Airport NO 3-9321

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'63

PAJAMA GAME

GENERAL

TICKET SALES

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Seats still available for
Thurs. Night, Friday Night,
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Thurs. night, Oct. 24
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