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October 20, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SI DAY'. nVTf R l6, 14191

THj.HGA AL

Nk

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

TEAM TEACHING:
English Department Uses

New Format

a
't

east Asia" in the Rackham East
Conference Room.
8 p.m.-The culture committee1
of ISA will present a "Folk-Cul-
ture" program on West Africa in
the International Center. This is
correlated with the Tuesday after-
noon discussions.
8 p.m.-Prof. J. Monteath Rob-
inson of the University of Glas-
gow will speak in Rm. 1300 Chem-
istry Bldg. on "Application of X-
ray Analysis to Alkaloid Struc.
tures."
8:30 p.m.-The Marina Svetlova:
Dance Ensemble will open the Uni-
versity Musical Society's Chamber
Dance Festival .in Rackham Aud.
Miss Svetlova is a former ballerina
of the Ballet Russe.
8:30 p.m.-The PTP will present
"A Phoenix Too Frequent" and
"Scapin" at Trueblood Theatre.
SATURDAY, OCT. 26
8:30 p.m.-Shanta Rao and her
company of dancers and musicians
from South India will perform in
Rackham Aud. Shanto Rao is
widely recognized as India's great-
est dancer.
8:30 p.m.-The PTP will present
Christopher Fry's "A Phoenix Too
Frequent" and Moliere's "Scapin"
at Trueblood Aud.
SUNDAY, OCT. 27
2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.-The pub-
lic is invited to visit the Medical
School's new Animal Research Fa-
cility in Room 3332 of the Medical
Research Bldg. Three times each
half hour a sound film, "Study of
Life," will be shown, after which
there will be tours of the Animal
Research Bldg.
3 p.m.-The PTP will present the
closing performance of Fry's "A
Phoenix Too Frequent" and Mo-
liere's "Scapin" at Trueblood The-
atre.
6 p.m.-The social committee of
ISA is sponsoring a "Spooks and
Spirits" supper in the Internation-
al Center. Everyone is invited.
There will be a nominal fee of
fifty cents per person to cover
food expenses.
8:30 p.m.--The Hungarian bal-
let's "Bihari" with Nora Kovach
and Istvan Rabovsky will be the
third and final concert in the
Chamber Dance Festival.

By KAREN WEINHOUSE
"Team teaching is the most suc-
cessful aspect of the new format
for English 123," Prof. Hubert M.
English of the English department
said last week.
Twenty-eight sections are parti-
cipating in the revamped program,
which divides the semester into
two-week units.
The first session of each unit is
a lecture for the entire group,
with a rhetorical principle or idea
discussed in regard to a previous-
ly assigned essay.
Seven Lecturers
Each of the seven lecturers for
the course meets with four of the
sections, two at a time, on the
second class day. He works with
the material from the lecture unit.
"This method keeps lecturers in
contact with the individuals in
his course, whereas usually a lec-
Parents To Attend
Tutorial Meeting
The Ann Arbor Tutorial Pro-
ject will hold a meeting at 2 p.m.
today in Room 3-S of the Union.
Tutors are urged to attend to meet
with the parents of the children
who will be tutored.

turer has little reaction from his
students," Prof. English noted.
In the remaining four sessions
of the unit, each instructor meets
separately with his section so that
previous papers and present work
may be discussed and criticized.
Writing Conferences
Five writing conferences are
planned for the semester, so that
each student can receive private
attention from his instructor.
"The two main purposes of the
program are to make the teaching
fellows' induction into the course
as smooth as possible and to al-
low the freshman students to get
experienced instruction," Prof.
English noted.
After a teaching fellow has had
a year of experience in the team
teaching program, he is given an
independent section which will
meet three times a week according
to the traditional format of Eng-
lish 123.
Be Significant
Teaching the student to say
something significantly is the ob-
jective of the first semester Eng-
lish course. The objective is sought
through the study of writing tech-
niques.
The lecture - recitation section
instruction was adopted on an ex-
perimental basis for both English
123 and 124 in the fall of 1962.

Last year the English depart-
ment offered 18 sections of Eng-
lish 123 and 12 sections of English
124 under the lecture-recitation
arrangement. However, freshmen
had the option of electing a recita-
tion-only section if they so de-
sired.
Since then, the revised format
has been used in a larger propor-
tion of the English 123 sections,
although the recitation-only for-
mat is used in the majority of the
sections.
DIAL 5-6290

DIAL 5-629
l '/tdll 1
/Miuiiir r

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It

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I -- MMMNANNNMNMN

CONTINUOUS
TODAY
FROM 1 O'CLOCK
DIAL 8-6416 "THE MOST REFRESHING MOVIE
GAIETY IN TOWN!
LESLIE CARON THE LAUGHTER IS
CONTINUOUS, SLY
AND HEARTY!"
z ': -Anon Ceook, World Telegram'

V/' //ACA'
zWALd DISNEY'S
TECHNICOLOR
CINIUMCOPE
3, 3.~e Qtr dd N 4YSTA d thuo a.kc Watt ia to N e*0

FABLES
3 BRAN " ) MNoldli C* AZ}
FAMOUS CLASSIC SERIES
"LITTLE WOMEN"

Weekday
Matinees 5c
Eves. & Sun. $1.00

Cartoon
and
News

One Day Only
Wed., Oct. 23

#I

i, ' - - - -

& MUCH ADO
Muc h tdoit 4fuee te-
'Much Ado' Succeeds at U-M

aD

DIAL 2-6264
I 11111f~ i~~
11in411l,. 1111lil
" STARTS TODAY "
Shows Start at 1:00
2:45-4:50-6:55 & 9.05~

By KEN BARNARD
Free Press Staff Writer
A fetching and accomplished
production of Shakespeare 's
'Much Ado About Nothing
opened the Fall Festival of the
University of Michigan's Asso-
ciation of Producing Artists
Thursday in Trueblood AAditor-
ium, Ann Arbor.
A strikig Spanish courtyard
set with clean lines provided a
flexible area for working out
the twin romances of Beatrice
with Benedick and Hero with
Claudio.
Richard Baldridge's direction
provided a deliberate pace that
resulted in extreme clarity of
expression and action.
It also decked out the play
with a generous amount of

stage business to point up the
character relationships and ex-
tract something close to the ut-
most of comic possibilities.
* * *
IN THE leading role of
Beatrice the beautiful man-
hater was Nancy Marchand,
well remembered for her crea-
tion of top feminine role in the
original television presentation
of "Marty."
She made of Beatrice a
woman of crisp wit and arch
manner, avoiding the coy over-
playing which has frequently
marred the rendition of this
role in less capable hands.
Opposite her as Benedick was
Ellis Raab, the APA's artistic
director.
He carefully built his por-
trayal and captivated the! aud-
ience with his working out of

the scene in which the sworn
bachelor decides that he will,
after all, become a suitor.
Clayton Corzatte, as Claudio,
submits a precise performance
that is born of rich experience
in classical assignments.
Jan Farrarand radiates
charm and sweetness as his be-
loved Hero.
* * *
AS DON JOHN, who schemes
to poison their romance, Paul
Sparer is an excellent heavy,
exuding malevolence with little
more explanation than "I can-
not hide what I am."
Joseph Bird engenders high
spirits with his low-comedy por-
$rayal of the officious and ver-
bose constable Dogberry. He has
a fine few minutes at stage
center reciting confusing and
useless orders.
-Detroit Free Press, Oct. 11, 1963

I
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I

TRUEBLOOD
THEATRE

SEATS AVAILABLE at Box Office

SAT., 8:30
SUN., 3::00

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