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October 16, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THE MICHIGAN' DAILY

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4. LECTURE:

Players Open with Moliere Drama

Volf Talks on Latin America

1 1

KAREN WEINHOUSE

Latin American social problems
emming from the superimposi-
)n of the Spaniards on the na-
re Indian culture was the topic
a lecture yesterday by Prof.
.c R. Wolf of the anthropology
part ent.
The epressed position of the
,tin American Indian has result-
from a self-imposed isolation..
When the Spaniards conquered,
ey destroyed the old ruling class
.d its integral relations. As a
echanism of self defense the In-
ans tried to isolate themselves,
)king on outsiders as a source of.
tential danger.
Poverty as Protection
They value poverty as a means
harmony. By linking ceremonial
ty which requires a significant
rsonal expenditure with political
fice, these Indian groups have
en able to abolish economic sur-
1s and in so doing prevent a
:althy class from gaining politi-
I power.
"Many political events in the1
At 50 years havebeen aneattempt
destroy these defensive walls,"
of. Wolf said.
A second social group which
>se from Spanish influence is'
e Mestizo which originated from
eague Appoints
Ommittee Staffs
[he following students have
n appointed by the Interview-f
and Nominating Committee to
chigan League committees:
Social: Kathy Sullivan, '65; Uni-f
-sity Services: Susie Finder, '65;
yle Rogers, '65; Beryle Leff, '66;
i Noble, '66; Jane Klotzbach,
Heather McCallum, '66.. -j
Publications: Elody Mondo, '65,
I Mary Lou Loesel, '66. Publi-
y: Carol iamond, '66, and Chris
.osier, '66. Community Services:

PROF. ERIC R. WOLF
... Latin American problems
an Indian and Spanish union. His-
torically, this group has been with-
out civic or political rights.
Independent Mestizos
"The Mestizo is not a member
of a fixed agricultural community
nor does he have political power,
but composes a large population
that floats somewhere in between
and is in need of support," Prof.
Wolf noted.
This group finds a place in so-
ciety through bonds of an informal
nature, an example of which is
the patron-client relationship. The
patron gains support either poli-
tically or in the form of labor by
extending goods and favors to his
supporters..
Kafka Series
Ends Tonight
The Student Government Coun-
cil reading and discussion series
will present the final program on
the works of Franz Kafka at 7:30
pm. today in the multi-purpose
rm. of the UGLI.
The program will be a round-
table discussion by, the five, fac-
ulty members who' have previously
spoken.

"It is a seemingly chaotic or-
ganization yet very real," Prof.
Wolf said.
Contrary to the Indian who tries
to deprive power of its sting, the
patron-client relation places a
strong value on power.
Power Emerges
Individuals emerge who have
access to political or economic re-
sources and who can purposively
organize these informal groups.
The political boss stands in the
same relation to his followers as
does the patron to his client.
"Latin American demonstrations
show resemblances to feuding be-
havior even when they take a
highly political form," Prof. Wolf
pointed out.
In the United States political
tensions don't come to armed con-
flict because there are ample re-
sources to split between contend-
ing groups.
Latin American conflicts have
not been negotiable because one's
followers must be paid off and
there have not been enough re-
sources to, divide among the fac-
tions.
This situation is typified by
problems resulting from attempted
'land reform.
Land Reform"
Almost all land reform laws
allow the owner to retain a certain
part of his holdings. The property
owner will hold onto the better
portion of his land. He may keep
that part which has a mill or that
port which is irrigated thus di-
minishing the value of the portion
to be sold. He will then take the
capital acquired from his second-
rate land and make first-rate in-
vestments.
The population problem also in-
creases the difficulties of land
reform. A certain portion of land
may be divided up for one genera-
tion, but the next will bring more
mouthsdthan the land can ac-
commodate.
Industrialization is required to
decrease dependence on the land
and to develop enough resources
to render this system obsolete.
Prof. Wolf's talk was the second
in a series of lectures on cultural
integration in a changing world
sponsored by the International
Students Association.

STUDENTS & FACULTY
BE INFORMED!
Call1662-8871
Program Information

,. I

9;

..r

-Daily-Kamalakar Rao
MERRIMENT-The University Players open their season at 8 p.m. tonight at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre with Moliere's "The Miser." The 17th Century French classic humorously exaggerates the
manners and behaviors of mankind. Season and individual tickets are on sale today through Satirday.

"BIZARRE AND BARBARIC...MACABRE AND GRUESOME...
IRONIC, BLOOD-STAINED AND SADISTIC ...UNCONVENTION-
AL...PROVOCATIVE...CONTROVERSIAL ...FILMED TO PRO-
DUCE MAXIMUM SHOCK!" -Frank Quinn, Daily Mirror

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE:
Meeting Discusses SGC

v

griffin, '65, and

Fran

U-M Players
Dept. of Speech

Moliere's

MHE MISER
TONIGHT, Fri., & Sat.

I

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Curtain Time-8:00 p.m.
Performances through
Saturday
12:30-8:00 p.m.
$1.50* and $1.00*
Season Tickets
$6.50* and $4.50'*
*Fri. and Sat. 25c
additional

l

HOOTENANNY
Michigan Union Ballroom
SUNDAY, October 20
2:30 P.M. and 8:30 P.M.

By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM
Over 50 persons attended the
Student Government Council mass
meeting yesterday aimed at ac-
quainting interested students with
the SOC structure of standing
committees and related boards.
Sponsored by the Council's pub-
lic relations board, the meeting
featured a general introduction to
SGC by President Thomas; Brown,
'66L., and, explanatory. speeches
about the various committees and
boards by their chairmen.
Cautioning against "spreading
yourselves too thin,"=Brown noted
that in the past "the most progress
on campus projects has been made
BIBLE FIRST:
Spann'Rp
apsCivil Rights
For Negroes
By DAVID ROSEN
"The Christian ministry is little
more than involved in the civil
rights struggle," a Negro evangelist
said Sunday at the University Re-
formied Church.
"Furthermore, the National: As-
sociation for the Advancement of
Colored People and the Congress
on Racial Equality practice in-
flammatory and un-Christian ac-
tivities, and the Negro in Amer-
ica has been swept away by the
liberal movement," Paul Spann
said.
Spann, a former student from
Tuskegee Institute, Lane College
and the Detroit Bible College, cit-
ed the courage needed to face God
as being more than that needed to
face Southern segregationists.
Spann also railed at Negro writ-
er James Baldwin because "some
ministers accept Baldwin's!words
above the word of God."
Breaking civil law is wrong,
Spann said, and therefore the Ann
Arbor sit-ins were in violation of
Christian principles.
"There is room in the civil rights

when one o rtwo persons became
interested in one particular thing."

New Ideas
What that "particular thing"
should be, he would not say.
"Council needs new ideas. You
should decide for yourself what is
needed to be done," Brown ex-
plained.
SGC Administrative Vice-Presi-
dent Thomas Smithson, '65, super-
visor of the committee structure,
explained the differences between
the committee and related board
structures.
The four standing committees-
Committees on Student Affairs,
University Affairs, Student Con-
cerns and United States National
Student Associaiton - serve as
Council's . legislative committees
and have "the more direct involve-
ment with SOC in its legislative
process," he said.
Specific Project1
These committees are referred1
specific projects "with the idea of
getting specific legislation." He
cited as an example the Committee
on Student Concern's proposed of-
ficer election changes which went
before the campus in a referen-
dum last week.
By contrast, the related boards
-including the public relations
board, human relations board and
student-book exchange. - serve
"virtually ,autonomously" from
Council, Smithson said.
DIAL 8-6416

7-

Structure,
He noted that the picketing
of University President Harlan
Hatcher's home last year for Uni-
versity support of the fair housing
ordinance had been done without
consulting Council.
Nancy Freitag, '64, chairman of
the Committee on Student Con-
cerns outlined the flexibility open
to committees in deciding on what
they want to work.
She explained that while two
years ago this committee made
resolutions on foreign affairs and
national issuesi "this year we're
working for bus service from the
hill to campus and trying to get
greater student welfare benefits."
Barlow To Discuss
Romney Tax Plan
The Young Democrats present
Prof. Robin Barlow at 7:30 p.m.
today, in Rm. 3D of the Michigan
Union. Prof. Barlow of the eco-
nomics department, will explain
and evaluate the Romney tax pro-
gram.
TRAVEL FAIR
South University Avenue
OCTOBER, 2
1.:30-5:30P.M.

1 ENDING TODAY "
1 j tlttllt tt~lutSOPHIA LOREN
MAXIMILIAN SCHELL
l D1IA~L 8LTHE CONDEMNED OF
DIAL Shows at
.2-26.2 6 650 49:00

4

1

0 STARTS THURSDAY
Shows Start at 1:00
2:45-4:50-6:55 & 9:05'

..

....

. . . . . . . . . .

"SIGHTS
NEVER
BEFORE
PHOTOGRAPHED
...SEE IT FOR
YOURSELF!
LIVE AND
LEARN!
Fascinating
. Shocking!"
W*nda H ao, o w

NOW

"HORRIF'YING,
WEIRD
HIDEOUS,
BIZARRE,
VORACIOUS
AND
FRANK!"
Bosley Crowlhw',
New York times

Produced by GUALTIERO JACOPETTI
TECHNICOLOR = A Times filmh Release

...,.

Tickets available at:

UNION MAIN DESK
MARSHALL'S BOOK STORE
THE SOUND CENTER

TODAY ONLY

i tL Jl ltJ J J a.il j

.. ....,

.

C

PRE-LAW STUDENTS

Thurs., October 17

2:30 Panel Discussion
"Undergraduate Preparation for Law School"

7:30 Address
"The Law School Admission Test-
Its Make-up and Purpose"

movenient for peaceful demon-
stration and picketing, but these
must be conducted in proper or-
der. Furthermore, those in the
front lines of civil rights action
must be careful of the company
they keep," Spann said.
Wineman To Speak
On Mathematics
Prof. Alan S. Wineman, of the
Brown University mathematics de-
partment wil speak on material
symmetry restrictions on non-
polynomial constitutive equations
at 4 p.m. today in Rm. 311, West
Engineering Bldg.

Speaker:

JOHN A. WINTERBOTTOM, L.S.A.T.

I

Program Director, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, N. J.
BOTH IN ROOM 100 HUTCHINS HALL-LAW QUAD

,I

RESUMING THURSDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
"CARRY ON REGARDLESS" & "GET ON WITH IT"

Sponsors:
College of L.S.&A.
Pre-Legal Studies Office

Co-sponsor:
Student Affairs Committee
Michigan Union

dj

The

FLY to NEW YORK!
Thanksgiving and Christmas Holidays

I

Po/ejisona/
P r
Thea ir

'II

I

I

Progra
presents

THE COMPANY

LEAVE:
RETURN:

NOV. 27
DEC. 1

DEC. 20
JAN. 12

DEC. 21
JAN.12

HURRY! SEATS GOING FAST!
IEhBEu Yn E A E $A

THUR. 8:30

Pr SCAPIN and
Premiere . PHOENIX TOO FREQUENT

III FRI* 8:30 l E U*~kEs

I

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