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October 13, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13. 1963

Past THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

Absorbtion
Fortunately, though, these for-
mer Samurai, during their life at
court. had absorbed an excellent
musical background. As a result,
the most important body of sha-
kuhachi comes from this period.
Its name is descriptive of its
ength: "shaku" indicates about
one foot and "hachi" means eight
inches. It has five finger holes,
four above and one below, and it
is held vertically.
It is capable of three octaves
and infinite color and variations.
Many authorities claim that it is
capable of a greater variety of
tones than either the flute or
oboe of the West.
Emotional Koto
The highly personal and in-
tensely emotional music of the
koto is the basis of many romantic-
stories. Tales are common in which
the lost true-love is found because
suitor hears her playing the koto
in her own inimitable style and,
with this clue, discovers her loca-
tion.
Evolved from a zither-type in-
strument, the koto is long and
slender with a wooden case about

Originally the koto was not a
solo instrument. as it is today,
but functioned as the accom-
paniment for a song or as an in-
terlude. Koto songs were short
ballads in a clear metrical form
and, though the ballads grew lon-
ger, they kept their metrical reg-
ularity. In present day Japan the
koto occupies a position not unlike
the parlor piano in the homes in
the West.
The latest of the imports from
China, introduced about 1562, is
the shamisen, or samisen. It is
regarded as the most versatile of
all Japanese instruments. It per-
forms the dramatic Gidayu music,
and also a major part of the Ka-
buki, the popular theater. But it
is basically an instrument of the
bards and the ballad-singers. It
entered the theater when the jor-
uri, recitative-type singing of the
bards, became the heart of the two
theater styles.
Shamisen
In appearance the shamisen
looks somewhat like a balalaika.
It can be employed either as a vir-
tuoso instrument or for casual
song accompaniment. It consists
of three strings which are plucked,
a long neck and a square sound-
box which is covered with cat
skin.
Having neither fingerboard nor
fret, it is played with a large
plectrum which is held in the right
hand and a slapping of the strings
with the left. It is an accompany-
ing instrument and is always sub-
servient to the song.
Kimio Eto, called the "Heifetz
of the Koto"by New York critics
who heard his concerts there, will
appear with Suzushi Hanayagi,
mistress of Japanese classical
dance and a trained Geisha, in a
unique type of concert. This type
is rarely seen by an Occidental,
even in Japan, because much of
the art of the Geisha is reserved
only for privileged Japanese art
lovers.
Rare Form
They have collaborated in re-
viving a rare form, called Juita,
a dance-ballad. Eto, a member of
the Ikuta school of koto playing,

and universities. Tentative sub-
topics for the afternoon session
include cooperative p r o g r a m s
among Midwestern universities,
relationships between Midwest-
ern universities and Negro col-
leges and problems in securing
Negro faculty in Midwestern uni-
versities.
The idea of having such a con-
ference arose from two previous
meetings at WSU on another
topic-the conformance form re-
quested by the President's equal
employment opportunity commit-
tee.
This committee had asked that
all agencies and companies re-
ceiving federal funds submit a list
of the numbers of minority em-
ployes working for them.
Out of these meetings grew an
opinion that a general discussion
of the Negro's role in higher 'edu-
cation was needed. So the Uni-
versity extended an invitation to
the Midwestern schools to attend
a conference here on the topic.
Industry Aides
Two industry representatives,
G. Roy Fugal and Arthur M. Doty,
were also invited to attend at
the suggestion of Taylor. Fugal
and Doty presently have programs
in their companies to employ
Negroes.
Tuskegee was also invited since
the University has already been
conferring with the institution to
see if possible areas of coopera-
tion between the two existed. Be-
ginning with Tuskegee President
Luther H. Foster's visit to Anti
Arbor last spring, several meet-
ings have been held. Several fac-
ulty members went down to the
Tuskegee campus twice last sum-
mer.
The University is considering
possible joint research projects
and student and faculty exchange
with Tuskegee.

TODAY
3 p.m.-Wind instrument stu-1
dents will give a public recital in
Lane Hall Aud. Eleven students
will play works by Arnold, Puc-
cini, Handel, Bozza, Vivaldi, Ibert!
and Trevarthen.
8:30 p.m.-Kimio Eto, thought
by many to be the greatest koto
player of our day, and Suzishi
Hanayagi, a leading Japanese clas-
sical dancer will give a concert
of Japanese music and dancing at
Rackham Aud. in the first presen-
tation of the Chamber Arts Series.
The koto, 4 type of zither harp
with 13 strings, is a very rare in-
strument even in Japan. Kimo,
who is blind, has been playing the
koto since he was five.
8:30 p.m.-Prof. Robert Glas-
gow of the music school will give
a program of French organ music
in Hill Aud. as the first event in
the second annual Conference on
Organ Music.
MONDAY, OCT. 14
10 a.m.-Prof. Marilyn Mason
of the music school will speak on
"Problems in the Performance of
Organ Music" in Hill Aud.
11 a.m.-Profs. Mason and Glas-
gow and James Dalton, organist
of Queen's College, Oxford, will
participate in a panel discussion
on "Some Aspects of Organ Teach-
ing" at Hill Aud.
2 p.m. - Dalton will discuss
"Bach: From Chorale to Prelude"
in Hill Aud.
4 p.m.-Prof. Wilson G. Smillie
of the Cornell University Medi-
cal School will speak on "Public
Health, Its Promise for the Fu-
ture" in the public health school
auditorium,
4:15 p.m.-Organists in the mu-
sic school's doctoral program will
give a recital of assorted organ
pieces in Hill Aud.
7:30 p.m.-J. O. Briss, patent at-
torney, will speak on "Patents and
Research" in North Hall.
8:30 p.m.-Dalton will give an
all-Bach organ recital at Hill Aud.
Also . . . The Student Directory
will go on sale from 8:30-4:30 p.m.
Also.....Alecture by James Mer-
edith will be given at 7:30 p.m.,
Oct. 22, in the Multi-purpose Room
of the library at the University's
Dearborn Center.
Tickets for the lecture may be
obtained by mailing 50 cents (stu-
dent rate) or one dollar to the
Council on Human Relations, The
University of Michigan, Dearborn
Campus, 4091 Evergreen Road,
Dearborn, Mich.
TUESDAY, OCT. 15
10 a.m.-Prof. Glasgow will give
a talk on "French Organ Music"
in Hill Aud.
11 a.m. - Dalton will view
"Bach's Transcriptions for Organ"
in Hill Aud.
2 p.m.-Prof. Erich Goldschmidt
of Eastern Michigan University
will discuss "Fugues of Bach" in
Hill Aud.
4 p.m.-The Culture Committee
of the International Students As-
sociation will sponsor the second
in a series of lecture-discussions
entitled "Common Values and Cul-
tural Change." Prof. Eric Wolf of
the anthropology department will
speak on the above topic in re-
gard to Latin America in the Mul-
ti-purpose Rm. of the UGLI.
4:15 p.m-Junior Panhellenic
Association will sponsor an inter-
national tea for all interested stu-
dents at Collegiate Sorosis socie-
ty, 1501 Washtenaw Ave.
Refreshments will be served at
the tea by Collegiate Sorosis and
Gamma Phi Beta sororities.
4:15 p.m.-Candidates for mas-
ter's degrees in the music school
who are majoing in organ will
present a recital in Hill Aud.
8 p.m.-S. K. Dey, a member of

the Indian cabinet, will speak on
"Problems in Indian Community
Development" in the- Rackham
Amph. in a lecture sponsored by
the Center for South Asian Stud-
ies.
8:30 p.m. - The Baroque Trio
will present a concert in Hill Aud.,
featuring works by Vivaldi, Gem-
iniani, Telemann, Loeillet and Karl
Bach.
Also ... The American Associa-
tion of University Women will
sponsor their annual book sale
Tuesday from 1-10 p.m. and Wed-
nesday from 9-12 a.m. in the SAB
basement.

Revenues from the sale of the
books will go to support the AAUW
Fellowships Program, w h i c h
awards graduate scholarships to
deserving women from all over the
world.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16
3 p.m.-The Committee on Re-
ferral will meet to conduct an
open hearing on the Student Gov-
ernment Council regulations on
membership selection in student
organizations in Rm. 1546, SAB.
4 p.m.-Alan S. Wineman of
Brown University's mathematics
department will speak on "Mater-
ial Symmetry Restrictions on Non-
Polynomial Constitutive Equa-
tions" in Rm. 311, West Engineer-
ing Bldg., in a talk sponsored by
the engineering mechanics depart-
ment.
7 p.m.-The Indian Students As-
sociation will present its Deep-
avali banquet, featuring Indian
cabinet member S. K. Dey as the
main speaker, in the Union Ball-
room.
7:30 p.m.-The Student Govern-
ment Council Reading and Discus-
sion Series will end its presenta-
tions on the works of Franz Kaf-
ka when the five faculty members
who have spoken on him thus
far will meet in a round-table dis-
cussion in the Multi-purpose Rm.
of the UGLI.
Participating will be Professors
Frithjof Bergmann of the phil-
osophy department, Heinz Puppe
of the German department, Fred-
erick Wyatt of the psychology de-
partment and Arnold Kaufman of
the philosophy department and
Donald Sumner of the English de-
partment.
8 p.m.-The University's chap-
ter of the American Society for
Public Administration will spon-
sor a speech by Prof. Herbert
Kaufman of Yale University's po-
litical science department on
"Laws, Theories and Organiza-
tions" in the Michigan Rm. of
the Michigan League.
Prof. Kaufman is the author of
numerous books and articles on
administrative organization and
management.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will begin their 1963-64 Playbill
with Moliere's comedy "The Mis-
er" at Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
The play, directed by Prof. Wil-
liam Halstead of the speech de-
partment, is a classic Restoration
comedy.
THURSDAY, OCT. 17
- 2:30 p.m.-Prof. Whitmore Gray
of the Law School, George Bouch-
er, Grand Rapids lawyer, and Mar-
tin Dickinson, editor of the Michi-
gan Law Review, will participate
in a panel discussion on under-
graduate preparation for law
school in Rm. 100, Hutchins Hall
in the first event of the Confer-
ence for Pre-Law Advisors spon-
sored by the pre-legal studies of-
fice of the literary college.
4 p.m.-S. K. Dey, Indian cab-
inet member, will receive an hon-
orary LLD degree from Universi-
ty President Harlan Hatcher at a
special convocation in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Dey, who is minister for com-
munity development in the Indian
government, will deliver an address

at this time on "Destination Man?"
7:30 p.m.-John A. Winterbot-
tom, program director of the Edu-
cational Testing Service's law
school admission test, will speak
on "The Law School Admission
Test-Its Makeup and Purpose" in
Rm. 100, Hutchins Hall.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "The Miser" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Professional The-
atre Program will present the As-
sociation of Producing Artists
Company in a double bill featur-
ing Christopher Fry's "A Phoenix
Too Frequent" and Moliere's "Sca-
pin" at Trueblood Theatre for the
second production in the PTP's
Fall Festival.
FRIDAY, OCT. 18
10 a.m.-A panel discussion will
be presented on "Law School Ad-
missions Practices and Problems"
in Rm. 100, Hutchins Hall.
Featured on the panel will be
Assistant Dean Roy F. Proffitt of
the Law School as moderator, As-
sociate Dean Lindsey Cowen of
the University of Virginia law
school, Associate Dean A. Kenneth
Pye of the Georgetown University
law center and Assistant Dean
William R. Shane of the Universi-
ty of Pennsylvania law school.
2 p.m.-The Regents will meet
in the Regents' Room of the Ad-
ministration Bldg.
4:15 p.m.--Prof. Delos Wickens
of Ohio State University will speak
on "An Evaluation of the GSR as
a Measure of Associative Strength"
in Aud. B in a psychology depart-
ment colloquium.
8 p.m.-Prof. John Malville of
the astronomy department will
discuss "Dust Between the Plan-
ets," and Saturn, Jupiter and a
double star will be ovserved at the
department's visitors' night in Rm.
2003, Angell Hall.
8 p.m.-The culture committee
of the International Students As-
sociation will present a folk-cul-
ture program on Latin America.
The program coincides with the
ISA lecture Tuesday.
8:30 p.m.-The Koutev Bulgar-
ian National Ensemble, featuring
75 singers, dancers and instrumen-
talists, will perform at Hill Aud.

l

STARTING TODAY
Shows Continuous
T,..frn d f 1 0APM

.I

DIAL 8-6416 1' *'m" '
". DO YOU CRY REAL TEARS AT
COMEDY? DOYQURSIDES k
* ACH E WH EN
YOU LAUGH
TOO HARD?
GOVERNOR FILMS
esentsF
Produced by
Peter Rogers
BE AN, AD EXPERT
(show Madison Avenue how its done)
Write the "perfect" ad for one of these 3 products
and win a matched set of five Kaywoodie pipes.
EVERYONE ENTERING WINS A
PACKAGE OF KAYWOODIE TOBACCO
In addition 5 major prizes awarded on your campus

1
X

The troupe, on its first Ameri-
can tour, will present Bulgarian
folksongs and dances.
8:30 p.m.-The PTP will present
"A Phoenix Too Frequent" and
"Scapin" at Trueblood Theatre.
8 p.m.-The University Players'
will present "The Miser" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
SATURDAY, OCT. 19
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "The Miser" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The PTP will present
Shakespeare's "Much Ado About
Nothing" at Trueblood Theatre.
8:30 p.m. - The International
Students Association will sponsor

an international pizzN party in
South Quadrangle.
Also . . . An exhibit of contem-
porary works by American land-
scape arcihtects will be on display
in the UGLI from Friday through
Nov. 10.
The display consists of 69 black
and white photographs demon-
strating seven categories of land-
scape architecture.
SUNDAY, OCT. 20
3 p.m.-Twelve flute students
will give a concert of flute music
in Lane Hall Aud.
3 p.m.-The PTP will present
"Much Ado About Nothing" at
Trueblood Theatre.

I
STARTING TODAY

U-M Players
Dept. of Speech

MOLL ERE'S
extravagant farce
THE MISER
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre
Wed.-Sat., Oct. 16-19
$1.50, $1.00'
Why pay more for less?
Save your money!
See "The Miser" and get
your money's worth
Valuable fun!
Fri. and Sat. 25c
additional
Individual performances
on sale Monday
ENDING TUESDAY
Prices-This Attraction Only
Matinees-$1.00
Eves. & Sun.-$1.25

Copy points on
AWk KAYWOODIE PIPES

i

Kaywoodie Super Grain-
pipe illustrated $7.95-
others from $5.95 to $2,OO.

J..

Pipes are today's symbol of the dominant masculine male. They provide
all the pleasure of smoking, without inhaling. Kaywoodie is the world's
best known pipe. Each bowl is painstakingly carved from rare grained,
imported briar. That's why Kaywoodie alwayssmokes cool and sweet.
Inside the pipe is Kaywoodie's unique aluminum invention, a permanent
filter that screens tars and irritants; condenses moisture; assures a
mild, dry, smoke. (Now let's see how much imagination you have)

I

J.

1

Shows at 1-2:45-4:50
6:50 &U9:00
ACADEMYAWARD STARS
TELLTHE SHOCKING
STORY OF WHAT
HAPPENED
IN THE MANSION
CALLED ALTONA.
~SOPlIA MA IMILIAN
LORENISCHELL
FRERC W AROBERT
MARC WANER

0

Ideas on NEW
KAYWOODIE TOBACCO
A ss

DIAL 5-6290

Imiported from Switzerland, it's an
exclusive formula of rich, rare
Cavendish Tobacco blended to per-
fection for flavor and mildness
(underline mildness). Important:
It's all tobacco, no "fillers" are
used. That's why it burns slowly,
evenly, and is easier to keep lit. In
special "pocket-pak" only ,50ยข.
(Try your creativity on this.one
and see what you come up with)

Specially designed - it's the
world's finest butane pipe lighter,
Upright for cigars and cigarettes
Tilt for large soft flame for pipes.
Easiest way yet to keep your pipe
lit. Only $9.95 with free miniature
Butane Injecto Refuel Cartridge
Guaranteed for life. (You take it
,from here)

Facts about NEW
KAYWOODIE BUTANE
LIGHTER

I

FLY t NEWYORK!
Thanksgiving and Christmas Holidays
Round Trip Fare-14
" (includes many extras)
Open to all Students, Faculty and Employees
Deadline: Contact:

L

pSL

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f

-6

__..

_

LOUIS JOURDAN-ELSA MARTINELLI
MARGARET RUTHERFORD-" MAGGIE SMITH
ROD TAYLOR AND ORSON WELLESIN

I

I

HERE'S ALLYOU DO -Write any size ad, large or small. You don't
have todraw, just describewhatever you want llu trated. The contest
ends December 31, 1963. Decision of the judges is final. A two-pipe set
will be awarded to the best ad on your campus. 4 runners-up will receive
a Kaywoodie pipe or lighter. These ads will then compete against the
winners from other colleges for a grand prize of a $100 matched grain,
five-pipe set. Everyone who enters receives a package of Kaywoodie
Tobacco. This contest is subject to alI'federal, state and local laws and
regulations. All entries become the property of Kaywoodie Pipes, Inc. Send
entries to Kaywoodie, New York 22, Dept. CU.
*KAYWOODIE

,..

Shows at 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:10 P.M.

f

I

Thanksgiving Trip-Oct. 25
Christmas Trip-Nov. 22

Mr. Jay Gampel
413 S. Division, Apt. 1
NO 8-8141, 4-8 P.M.

The

'I

P ejina
T Aecdre

JIIN

SOPH SHOW

'63

"PAJAMA GAME"
BLOCK TICKET SALES

ProTam
P THE

COMPANY

Presents

a
a_

I

OCT. 14-19

I

Premere!CAPI N and
THUR. 8:30 Peir PHOENIX TOO FREQUENT

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