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October 10, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY. OCTOBER 10, 1963

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. OCTOBER 10. 1Q~I'i
U U

-. - . - - - V, -ju"

ix Reform
pends on
,mocrats
(Continued from Page 1)
ugh passage of the gover-
program in any form may
depend on whether he can
Democrat support, Demo-
are generally non-committal.
ndy (D-Detroit) admitted he
'obligated to do something
ax program, but I can't buy
wvernor's program in its en-
I hope he'll modify and
we'll take a look at it."
ierally in agreement was
Minority Leader Joseph J.
lski (D-Detroit) who wants
ait and see what comes out
tax committees. We're for
iscal reform. After the bills
ut of committees, we'll de-
we want a caucus position
em or whether Democrats
e free to do as they want."
ate Majority Caucus Lead-
anley G. Thayer (R-Ann
), regarded a sthe key Rom-
tategist, opposed any shift
alternate idea. "If you turn
d in midstream, you're liable
I up with nothing," he, said.
in the Lower chamber,
er of the House Allison
(R-Kingston) was more
us. "We need a thorough
of the whole program. And
need bipartisan support to

Student Art Displayed on Diag

Bigelow Discusses
Non-Violent Moves

i

INDIAN SUMMER
GOLF SALE

"UNDER THE BIG TOP"-Students and faculty members of the Architecture and Design School yes-
terday displayed their original works on the Diag in an exhibit sponsored by the Union-League.
The show was staged in a tent set up on the lawn north of the Graduate Library.
$47.6 MILLION:
'U'Submits Record Budget Request

emocrats generally agreed with
iney that the 23-part pro-
1 will have to stand toFether
a package, and legislative
ces hold that this will require
nsive modification, in order
et tthe whole program through
ct.
ie Legislature last night re-
d until Tuesday, but little,
be accomplished in the next
ays, due to the fact that the
rnor leaves Tuesday f o r
m-Baden, Germany, to sup-
Detroit's Olympics bid.
sides, committees will be
ying various alternate pro-
Js which have only just ceased
ol in. Several are regarded
owerful substitutes.

(Continued from Page 1)

qCC Plans
.w Project

sity to submit to the State Con-
troller's office the bare minimum
sums necessary to maintain the
present level of operation of the
University.
Austerity
Niehuss said this figure-$41
million - was totally inadequate
unless the University planned to
remain at a virtual standstill in
every facet of its operation.
The figure was based on an ex-
pected $13 million income from
student fees and nearly $1 mil-
lion from other sources. The esti-
mated figure included an esti-
mated price increase for present
services and slight salary increas-
es, according to Niehuss.
"The University could not pos-
sibly accept an increase in enroll-
ment or of faculty under the $41
million figure," Niehuss com-
mented. He added that the re-
quest from Romney had asked
for the figure "however unreal-
istic it niay be."Niehuss agreed
that the figure was unrealistic.
Because of the expected in-
crease in enrollment of in-state
students, the University plans to
maintain a static figure on the
number of out-of-state students
accepted next fall.

This will mean the number of
out-of-state students will de-
crease in proportion to the num-
ber of in-state students. There
will therefore be a corresponding
decrease in the proportion of in-
state and out-of-state tuition.
President Hatcher said the
$47.6 million request was based
on an enrollment of 28,600 stu-
dents for next year, an increase
of 1300.
No Hike
Niehuss said the present budget
does not anticipate a tuition hike
as a result. He said the decrease
in the ratio was not sufficient
enough to warrant such an in-
crease.
Other items in the requested in-
crease are: $585,056 for additional
library staff and additional books
and instructional supplies; $566,-
617 for operation of new build-
ings, improvements in building
services, and repairs and main-
Pick; Initiates
Foar Quadrants
Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs James A. Lewis and Housing
Director Eugene Haun were re-
cently selected honorary members
of Quadrants Honorary for West
Quadrangle.
Regular initiates are William
Connolly, Grad; John Eadie, '65;
Will Irwin, '66; William Howard,
'64; Terry Kohler, '66E; Gary
Sackett, '64BAd, and Leonard
Weinstein, '65.

tenance of utilities and grounds;
and $850,995 for increased re-
search sand public services with
$559,995 earmarked for expan-
sion of the Institute of Science
and Technology.
Broader Support
Michigan's hopes for a research-
based economy and more jobs,
along with a rapidly expanding
population, necessitate a broader
support for higher education,
President Hatcher said.
In his presentation of the re-
quest, he emphasized the unique
position of the University in aid-
ing the, state's economy. President
Hatcher said the University com-
bines over-all excellence with
specific strengths in the growing
graduate and professional fields.
He also stressed the University's
ability to draw research dollars
and new business and industry to
Michigan. "To make this contri-
bution it is essential to maintain
the quality of faculty which is
traditional to the University,"
President Hatcher added.
Help State
"It is to maintain and improve
this position of excellence and
this valuable resource of the state.
of Michigan that the University
requests consideration of its pro-
gram plan and budget," he said.
"It is our intent to continue our
present position of national lead-
ership in advanced graduate and
graduate-professional programs,"
he said.
"There will be continued expan-
sion in post-doctoral and profes-
sional studies."

By JOHN WEILER
"Non-violence demands a deci-
sion," Albert Bigelow, one of the
original freedom riders, said yes-
terday.
Theformer World War II skip-
per said, "opportunity (for non-
violence) was put in my way and I
took it." He commented that the
change in his ideals came during
the war and that he felt that he
had to do something.
X-Rays Act
On Rat Brain
Development
By ROBERT JOHNSTON
University researchers nsProf.
Samuel Hicks anid Constance
D'Amato of the Medical School
have reported in a recent issue of
"Science" magazine that very
small doses of X-ray irradiation
have "a consistently widespread
effect on the developing rat brain."
This is the first time that such
small radiation doses have been
shown to have consistent effects
on developing nerve cells.
Doses used ranged from 10 to
40 rads, while natural radiation
from the earth and from cosmic
rays is about one rad per 10 years.
Atomic Testing
This level is increased about 10
to 30 per cent by atomic testing.
A normal X-ray gives about 1 rad
dose.
The researchers, working in the
Medical Center Pathology Depart-
ment, irradiated different litters
of rats on the 16th, 18th and 22nd
days of the mother's pregnancy
and on the day after birth.
. Prof. Hicks noted that the small
irradiation doses altered individ-
ual nerve cells into abnormal
shapes, disrupted the orderly
structure of different layers of the
brain, and produced a shortage of
neurones in the cortex.
Cause Malformation.
Much higher doses of 200 to 300
rads have already been shown to
cause malformation as well as
widespread changes in the devel-
oping brain which have produced
functional defects in the rats.
The low doses of radiation may
be functionally as harmful to rats
as the higher ones, but work has
not yet begun that would bear this
out.
Union Directors
Choose Chairmen
The Michigan Union Board of
Directors at its last meeting offi-
cially filled two vacancies on the
Union's Executive Council. James
Boughey, '66A&D, was named.
chairman of the social committee.
Boughey is currently general
chairman of Homecoming. Kent
Cartwright, '65, was named to
head the international affairs
committee.

Bigelow used his non-violent
views in 1958 when he protested
the A-bomb by sailing his ship,
the Golden Rule, into Pacific
testing areas.
Non-violence, he noted, is based
on religion, specifics, control, con-
structive revolution, directness, se-
curity, and individuality.
Common Principles
Bigelow said that since many
religions have supported non-
violent moves religions are basic to
the principles of the moves. Reli-
gions insist on truth and this is
true also of non-violence.
Although we are unequal in
some ways, we have many of the
same aspirations, and thus we are
equal in many other ways, Bigelow
surmised. "Basic friendship" is this
relation.
Non-violence starts in each in-
dividual. It is controlled and rev-
olutionary and goes to the roots
of a problem.d"Non-violence is a
continuation of the never ending
American Revolution," Bigelow
added.
Create Climate
'In order to have non-violent ac-
tivities a climate must be created.
"If we aren't non-violent then we
must be violent. Either we use the
A-bomb or we don't," Bigelow
commented.
"I am willing to die not to kill,"
Bigelow said in summing up his
feelings of the issue of non-viol-
ence.
Bigelow outlined some charac-
teristics of non-violence as self-
control, democratic change of poli-
cy, and discipline.
Freedom Rider
Bigelow said that on the freedom
rides self-control was needed in
order to withstand the attacks
faced by the participants. The
democratic changes had to be up-
held once they were adopted.
Even if one of the group was
threatened, it was understood that
there could be interference by
another in the group.
Bigelow stressed that revolution
not reform is the basis of non-
violence. There must be basic
changes among men.
Must Create
Bigelow added that openness,
directness, and honesty are also
non-violent ideals. Security must
be created. "War and violence de-
pend upon the utmost of insecur-
ity for the opponent," he added.
If there is no retaliation, there is
no fear..
He noted that freedom marchers
have dignity, which hurts their op-
ponents. Society is impersonal, but
non-violence tends to make per-
sonal relationships. This demands
a certain independence.
Bigelow said that no training is
needed in some instances to be-
come non-violent.
Bigelow said he is opposed to
the force used by the federal gov-
ernment in the racial crisis. The
local corruption in the South, he
said, should be left to the South to
solve.
In summing up non-violence, he
said that Mahatma Gandhi once
said "the way to do is to be."
Bigelow's speech was sponsored
by the Office of Religious Affairs
through the courtesy of the
Americans Friends Service Com-
mittee.

SOLD OUT
STANDING ROOM ONLY TICKETS
Friday, October 11
at Hill ,BoxOffice 100-500

SGC Reading and Discussion Group
KAFKA
TONIGHT at 7:30
Multipurpose Room Ugl

CARTS
BAGS

.

20% OFF

Speaker:
DR. ARNOLD KAUFMAN, Dept. of Philosophy

CLUBS
SHOES

ST EIN & GOETZ Sporting Goods
315 So. Main St.-Downtown

CHRISTY MINSTRELS

October

.rr

WAKE UP!
*o *
Pajama Gameo's Comng
'63
OCT. 24, 25, 26
Matinee and Evening shows on Saturday

12, 1963

Jniversity Friends of the Stu-
nt Non - violent Coordinating
mmittee plan to institute a pro-
m of raisingmoney from fra-
nities and sororities on campus.
['hey hope to get each fraternity
: sorority to contribute a set
ount each week to SNCC.
['hey will send $1000, which they
sed in a bucket drive on cam-
s last week, to the SNCC office
Atlanta.

"""

DIAL 5-6290

Prices-This Attraction Only
Matinees-$1.00
Eves. & Sun.-$1.25

HOMECOMING '63

DUPLICATED DISPLAY PETITIONS
will be due in the Homecoming Office
2-4 Fiday, Oct. 11

ACROSS CAMPUS:
To Present Opera, Four Lectures

PANAVISION and METROCOL.IR
S :

1
ry'

DEC. 27TH

JAN. 10TH

JET EUROPE
DET-ZU RICH-DET
PICK UP IN NYC
$24000

FOR DETAILS CALL:
HOWARD BERLAND
NO 3-3967

All inclusive ALPINE ski
trips with meals,
lodging, daily ski
instruction, transportation,
and transfers.
399.00

The linguistic club is sponsoring
a speech by Harold Wenrich at
7:30 tonight in Rackham Amph.
Chemistry Lecture ...
Prof. Myron L. Bender of North-
western University will speak on
"The Mechanism of Chymotry-
psin-Catalyzed Reactions" at 8
p.m. tonight in Rm. 1300 of the
Chemistry Bldg.
Prof. Bender, nationally known
for his work in physical chemistry
and on the application of prin-
ciples of physical chemistry to
bio-chemistry, will address a regu-
lar meeting of the University
chapter of the American Chemical
Society.
Cuban Talk....
Patricia Sopiak, '63, will speak
on her trip to Cuba this summer at
a meeting of the Young Democrats
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 3-S of
the Michigan Union.
Opera-...
The Goldovsky Opera Theatre
will present Puccini's "Tosca" in

English at 8:30 p.m. today in Hill
Aud. in the first presentation of
the Extra Concert Series.
Featured in the lead roles will
be Dean Wilder and Josephine
Busalacchi. The director of the
company is Boris Goldofsky, for-
mer radio commentator for the
Metropolitan Opera broadcasts.
This will be the first time
"Tosca" has been presented by the
University Musical Society.
French Speaker .. .
Edouard Mort-Sir, cultural ad-
visor to the French embassy and
representative in America of the
French universities, will speak in
French on "La Jeunesse Francaise
Aujourd'hui" at 4:10 p.m. today
in Rackham Amph.
The talk is sponsored by the
Romance languages department.
Tutorial Meeting .. .
The Ann Arbor Tutorial Project
will hold a meeting at 7:30 tonight
in the Union.
Specific problems related to tu-

toring will be discussed. Everyone
is urged to attend.
Tutor Interviews . .,
Students who have registered to
participate in the Ann Arbor Tu-
torial Project should go to Rm.
2543, SAB for information and
interview between 9 a.m. and 6
p.m. today and tomorrow.
DIAL 2-6264
Shows at 1:00-2:50
4:50-6:50 and 9:00
These arethe"borderlines"
their souls...their bodies...
belong to "The Caretakers"

Good'Seats for Thursday at Box Office

I I

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF ONLY

NOWAL46
DIAL 8-6416

Shows
at
7-9 P.M.

"THE FILM IS THE ART OF THE 20th+
IT ENCOMPASSES ALL THE OTHER
ABOVE ALL, IT GIVES US A MEANS

CENTURY.
ARTS.

I

University Players
Dept. of Speech
MOLI ERE'S
wonderful farce

I

4

THE

USER

I

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Wed.-Sat., Oct. 16 - 19

ROBRT1ACK I O[Y BERG[N
JOAN CRA'W[ORD I JANIS PAIGE
DIAN[ M BAIN NTH E
~LJ (. m i mw. a 111 U - .

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j. 1 :, :. ..:
Siff X.. >w..3°" : : . ... r}'y.... ...::_ - ;:.. !.

I I .JU' and 1.UUm I

I

Trueblood

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