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October 06, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-06

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THE MICHIGAN UA TT V

w

_______________________________________________________SUN D AY , OCTO"E

6. 1963

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

(EDITOR'SNOTE: Beginning with
today's issue, The Daily will print
each Sunday a preview of the events
and lectures on campus for the
coming week. The events will be
advanced again on the morning of
their occurrence.)
TODAY
2 p.m. - Assembly Association
and Inter-Quadrangle Council will
hold a conference on University
housing in the Michigan League
Ballroom.
Director of Housing Eugene
Haun will deliverthe keynote
speech at 2 p.m., after which par-
ticipants-including any interested
students-will break up into nine
discussion committees.
The topics include coeducational
housing, the Office of Student Af-
fairs, counseling, freshmen in the
residence halls, apartments, in-
tellectual atmosphere in residence
halls, role and function of As-
sembly-IQC, and communication
within the system.
7 p.m. - Student Government
Council candidates will speak at
the SGC all-campus forum in the
Michigan Union Ballroom, dis-
cussing the basic problems in stu-
dent, faculty and administrative
relationships within the University
community.
Each candidate will speak for,
two minutes. The first two min-.
utes of each speech must be de-
voted to commenting on the basic
problems of student-administra-
tive relationships in reference to
the Office of Student Affairs.wh
The program will conclude with
an open-end question and answer;
period.
MONDAY, OCT. 7j
4:10 p.m.--Prof. Emeritus Y. R.
Chao of the University of Cali-,
fornia at Berkeley will speak on
"Tone and Intonation in Chineset
Speech and Sound" in Kellogg
Aud. Prof. Chao is president of
the Linguistic Society of America.1
His lecture is sponsored by the
Far Eastern languages and litera-
tures department and the Center
for Chinese Studies.
8 p.m.--Prof. Mary Bromage of
the business administration school4
will speak on "Irish Political Na-
tionalism in the 20th Century-aI
Prototype?" at a meeting of the
Women's Research Club in the
West Conference Rm. of Rackham
Bldg. The lecture will concern her1
work with President Eamon de
Valera in Ireland the past summer.1
8:30 p.m.-Metropolitan Opera
bass Jerome Hines will give thet
third concert in the Choral Union1
Series in Hill Aud.
The first half of the programl
will include arias from works by

Bach, Mendelssohn, Peri, Beetho-
ven, Zandonai, Carrissimi and
Boito, as well as the American
composers Virgil Thomson and
William Grant Still.
The second half will feature
costume and makeup scenes from
"DonGiovanni" and, in Russian,
"Boris Godounov."
8:30 p.m.-A Student Composers
Forum, featuring the eompositions
of David Andrew, '65, Peter Cle-
ments, '63SM, Gregory Kosteck,
Daniel Perlongo, '64VM, and Wil-
liam Albright, '64SM, will be held
in Aud. A. The Student Honors
Quartet will assist in the per-
formance.
Also . . Box office sales for
Shakespeare's "Much Ado About
Nothing," presented by the Pro-
fessional Theatre Program, will
open at Trueblood Theatre. Box
office hours will be 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Monday through Wednesday, 10
a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday through
Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on
Sunday.
TUESDAY, OCT. 8
4:10 p.m.-Albert Bigelow, who'
in 1958 attempted to sail his!
ship "Golden Rule 1958" in the
atomic bomb testing area in the
Pacific, will discuss "The Power
and Practice of Non-violence" in
Aud. A.
Bigelow also was a Freedom
Rider in 1961 and walked for a
month in the India to China Peace
March earlier this year. The lec-
ture is sponsored by the Office
of Religious Affairs.
7:15 p.m.-A group interested in
securing 2-6 month jobs in Michi-
gan for foreign students will meet
in the coffee lounge of the Busi-
ness Administration Bldg.
Each job obtained by the 'As-
sociation of Economic and Busi-
ness Students sends one American
on an exchange program overseas.
All people with backgrounds in
economics or business are invited
to the meeting.
8:30 p.m.-The University fac-
ulty Woodwind Quintet will give a
public concert in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall. They will play "Quintet
in E Minor" by Anton Reicha,
"Quintet for Wind Instruments"
by Gordon Sherwood and "M'ladi"
by Leos Janacek.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 8
4 p.m.-Voice political party will
hold a protest rally against Ameri-
can foreign policy in Viet Nam on
the Diag.
8:30 p.m.-The Stanley Quar-
tet will give a public concert in
Rackham Lecture Hall. On the
program will be "Quartet in C
major, Op. 33, No. 3" by Haydn,
"Quartet in D major, Op. 18, No.

3" by Beethoven, and "Quartet
No. 6" by Bartok.
Also ... the first major showing
of the "pop art" movement in this
section of the country will be ex-
hibited in the Museum of Art
Wednesday through Nov. 3.
The show is divided into two
phases. The major group, "Six
Painters and the Object," was
assembled by Lawrence Alloway,
curator of the Solomon R. Gug-
genheim Museum in New York
City and one of the early inter-
preters of the movement in the
mid-1950's.
A supplementary section has
been selected by Samuel Sachs, as-
sistant director of the Museum
of Art, and Prof. Irving Kaufman
of the architecture college. This
section features paintings by six
artists: Jim Dine, Jasper Johns,
Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rausch-
enberg, James Rosenquist and
Andy Warhol.
THURSDAY, OCT. 10
4:10 p.m.-Edouard Morot-Sir,
cultural adviser to the French
embassy and representative in
America of the French universi-
ties, will speak on "La jeunesse
francaise aujourd'hui" in Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. The talk is
sponsored by the Romance lan-
guages department.
4:15 p.m.-Ahmad Hijazi will
speak on "The Transfer of Juris-
diction from British to Local
Courts in Kuwait" in Aud. D.
Hijazi was a judge in Kuwait at
the time of the transfer.
7:30 p.m.-Patricia Sopiak, '63,
will speak on her trip to Cuba
this summer at a meeting of the
Young Democrats in the Union.
8 p.m.-Prof. Myron L. Bender
of Northwestern University will
speak on "The Mechanism of Chy-
motrypsin-Catalyzed Reactions" in
Rm. 1300 of the Chemistry Bldg.
Prof. Bender, nationally known
for his work in physical chemistry
and on the application of princi-
ples of physical chemistry to bio-
chemistry, will address a regular
meeting of the University chapter
of the American Chemical So-
ciety.
8:30 p.m.-Puccini's "Tosca" will
open the Extra Concert Series in
Hill Aud.
Boris Goldovsky will direct the
opera, to be presented in English
by the Goldovsky Opera Theatre.
Starring will be Dean Wilder as
Mario Cavaradossi, and Josephine
Busalacchi as Floria Tosca.
FRIDAY, OCT. 11
4:15 p.m.-Prof. E. Lowell Kelley
of the psychology department will

lecture on "Selection of Peace
Corps Volunteers" in Aud. B.
8 p.m.-Prof. Richard G. Teske
of the astronomy department will
speak on "Fun with Light" at the
department's visitors' night at
2003 Angell Hall. Visitors will be
able to observe Saturn, Jupiter and
the Hercules cluster.
SATURDAY, OCT. 12
8:30 p.m.-The New Christy
Minstrels will perform in Hill Aud.
in a concert sponsored by the
Pershing Rifles. Block ticket sales
begin Oct. 7 from 9 a.m.-noon
and 1-5 p.m. at the Hill Aud.
ticket booth. General sales begin
Oct. 8 through Saturday during
the same hours.
SUNDAY, OCT.13
3 p.m.-Wind instruments stu-
dents will give a public recital
in Lane Hall Aud. Eleven students
will present works by Arnold, Puc-
cini, Handel, Bozza, Vivaldi, Ibert
and Trevarthen.
8:30 p.m.-Prof. Robert Glas-
gow of the music school will pre-
sent a program of French organ
music in Hill Aud.

Co

uM.

DIAL 8-64 161
ntinuous Today from 1 P.M.
"REMARKABLY
YITAL. THE PICTURE IS
MA NIFICENT!
. K4. V.Pee
IWILD
"AND
EWKY
LARIUS" FROLIC "sparrows" is
Life , both comic and
111 a N .Y.ow believable. It is
also one of the
_ most entertain-

lb

''H1

s

"A SMASHER;
brilliant, almost
beyond praise"
New Yorker

c A D ~ .E~U Ci

ing and success-
ful comedies to
hit Ann Arbor in
a long, long
time.
-Hugh Holland
Michigan Daily

I-

J

LOUIS,,JOURDAN a EL '_ A * LL MARGARET MGGE MIH-TODAE
N
PANAVISION* and METROCOL.OR _ _.
CO-STARRING WRITTEN BY OIECTEO By "ODUEO 9
LINDA CHiRISTIAN EECERATTGAN" ANTHONYASQUITH.AATOLE E GRUWAL

V.

i
i

TODAY
Shows at 1, 3, DIAL
5, 7 & 9:15 '5-6290

U

PRICES--This Attraction Only
Matinees $1.00-Eves. & Sun. $1.25

p
I

Two-Year College Board Study Ends
(Continued from Page 1)

seled for first semester courses.
Outside of admissions, the
achievement tests are used in
guidance and academic counseling
and placement.
The achievement tests are used
for placement mostly by physical
science and language departments.
No social studies departments em-
ploy achievement test results. The
Honors Council uses the tests in
choosing honors students.
For Expediency's Sake
Because of these uses of the
achievement test-guidance, aca-
demic counseling and placement
and, when necessary, admissions-
they will probably be retained, if
only for convenience.
However, the problem of gath-
ering admissions information still

remains. The University may seek
to solve those problems by working
within CEEB to develop tests
which do add substantial infor-
mation beyond the SAT.
This influence is possible be-
cause CEEB is a voluntary associa-
tion of universities and colleges.
The University has had many rep-
resentatives on the board and has
often participated in policy deci-
sions. Some feel, however, that
CEEB would not acquiesce to spe-
cific University admissions needs
-especially if the University con-
tinued use of the achievement
tests.
'Raw Carrots'
Another possibility for gather-
ing further information for admis-
sions is the Opinions, Attitudes
and Interests Survey, generally

U

U

known here as the "raw carrots"
test. This test was developed over
a 10-year period by Prof. Benno
G. Fricke of the psychology de-
partment and associate chief of
the evaluations and examinations
division of the Bureau of Psy-
chological Services.
The test is required by no col-
lege or university, but is considered
in admissions by many, including
the University. The tests are scor-
ed by the Educational Testing
Services, which then, as with the
college boards, distributes the re-
sults to institutions. For the first
time, the admissions office will be
able to make some decisions using
the OAIS'results returned by ETS
for those students who choose to
have the test count.
The OIAS differs markedly from
the standard aptitude and achieve-
ment tests in that it attempts to
measure several personality traits
including creative ability, motiva-
tion for achievement and social
and emotional adjustment.
It also rates students on five
interest factors: business, human-
ities, social and behavorial science,
physical science, engineering and
mathematics, and biological and
health sciences.
Perhaps the greatest advantage
of the OAIS is that it reflects a
more complete picture of the stu-
dent.
However, the OAIS is far from
gaining the almost universal ac-
ceptance of the achievement tests,
and the test may never reach such
popularity, in spite of its demon-
strated ability to aid admissions
decisions.
The main reason for this is the
popular resistance to the nature of
such personality tests.

HAL KI RLH I Presents
ROBERT STACK POLY BERGEN ,JOAN CRAWFORD ,IJAN13 PAIGE
DIANE McBAIN NT HI..CA/REIA1(ERSM1
VAN 'IWAMS/CONSANCE FORD/SHARON HUOUENY/HERBERT MARSHAL/ANASLCLIR/lBBABA 8ARRIE fE~VAUGNJMke ~JSUSAN OVE

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TONIGHT
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL:
CORNED BEEF ON RYE

t

Hillel members
Non-members

75c
$1.00

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NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS

9

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