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September 10, 1963 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-10

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1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,' SEPTEMBER x:0,1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10. 19G2

I

Wake Defines 'Conservation'

Fraternity Changes Houses,
To Construct New Building

I

PROF. WILLIAM H. WAKE
... conservationist

iversity of techniques that served rather than on the con-
cupy us today. servation of those resources, he
iat unity is evolving from the added..
pt of conservation as thought Metaphor
etion to utilize our resources In an extended metaphor, Prof.
ectively as possible. This ben- Wake reviewed conservation as a
nan with resource improve- many-faceted diamond "linked
where feasible and protection closely with every aspect of life.
necessary," he continued. "Perhaps the most cogent jus-
ie of the vagueness surround- tification for likening conservation
e concept has resulted from to a many-faceted diamond is the
ng of too much attention on scope and complexity of intellec-
sources that need to be con- tual and practical, technological
and economic, political and ethi-
cal considerations that are and
T F' t itl must be associated with the phil-
osophy, principles, and practices
of conservation."
Counselors If conservation is a diamond,
then its facets are many, he said.
. Paul Halmos of the Uni- Prof. Wake cited 12 which by nec-,
r of Keele in Staffordshire, essity must be associated with the
Ad will speak on "Faith of philosophic view-conserving our
elors" at 3:00 p.m. today in resources for the benefit of man---
" of Angell Hall. which composes its core.
lecture is being sponsored by No Classifications
[ental Health Research In- The first of these facets is re-
source classification with conser-
Special College BuffetF
(University students only)
Com plete dinner $ 50
(all you can eat) 1 0
Tuesday, September 10, 1963
5:30-8.00 P.M.
INN AMERICA
3250 WASHTENAW

vational significance. "None of the
existing classifications is com-
pletely satisfactory," Prof. Wake
explained.
"Classification is needed, how-
ever, zecause it can provide a
summation of pertinent attributes
in order of importance and show
the interrelationships and common
characteristics of apparently un-
related and unlike resource ele-
ments in- a way that facilitates
both thinking and doing," he com-
mented.
Other sides and implications of
the diamond-like conservation
must include the roles of science,
technology, law, politics and ad-
ministration, economics, the his-
tory of conservational thought and
deeds, social patterns and reac-
tions, cultural patterns, psycholog-
ical responses, ethics, and educa-
tion, he continued.
Prof. Wake emphasized the im-
portance of the last category-ed-
ucation. "Education and training
can help establish a well-defined
concept of conservation in effective
action. Lack of them can be the
complete undoing of all conserva-
tional thought and effort."
"Yet the existing amorphous
philosophy of resource conserva-
tion has already brought all of
us many valuable benefits through
its implementation in resource-us-
ing projects, and in practices, hab-
its and attitudes it has engender-
ed," Prof. Wake concluded.
Hold Auditions
For 'Mikado'
Three little maids from school
and a wandering minstrel were
seen on Sunday night in Rm. 3G
of the Union as 250 people attend-
ed the mass meeting of the Gilbert
and Sullivan Society.
G&S, which will present "The
Mikado" Nov. 21-23, is currently
holding auditions for nine prin-
cipal parts and a 40-member chor-
us.
Music for the show will be con-
ducted by William Donahue, new-
ly-appointed musical director.Ger-
shom Morningstar will continue as
dramatics director.
Auditions for the orchestra will
be held from 3-5 p.m. Sunday and
7:30-9:30 p.m. Monday in Rm. 3G
of the Union.

MRS. ROBERT CLARK
... new position

Clark Gains
Unique Post
Panhellenic Association and the
Michigan League will operate this
year with a common tie to the Of-
fice of Student Affairs.
This summer, Mrs. Robert Clark
was appointed advisor to both or-
ganizations after Miss Gardhouse
stepped down as advisor to the
League late last spring. Mrs. Clark
was chosen at a meeting of the
League council with Coordinator
of Counseling Mrs. Davenport.
The idea of having one advisor
for both groups came as the League
maintained it would only need the
services of an advisor part time
during the afternoon, leaving
mornings free for al advisor to
work with Panhel.
Mrs. Clark's job will be to
function primarily as a sounding
board for ideas from Panhel and
League. However, she will have no
veto power over these groups.
"Acting as liaison between the
OSA and the League and Panhel
will occupy most of Mrs. Clark's
time. Through her, the OSA will
be able to follow League and Pan-
hel activities and we in turn will
know what the OSA expects of
us," commented League President
Gretchen Groth, '64.
"I will advise Panhel during
rush, assisting rush counselors and
rush chairmen in order to facili-
tate a better rush," Mrs. Clark
commented.

By STEVEN HALLER
Sigma Phi Fraternity is now in
the process of planning to move
to a. new location at 907 Lincoln
and hopes to be fully instated in
the new building by next fall's
rush period, William L. Newman,
president of the fraternity's alum-
ni board of trustees, said yester-
day.
Newman noted that the old
house at 426 N. Ingalls would be
razed to provide parking space
for the expanding St. Joseph Mer-
cy Hospital.
"When the old house was first
built 65 years ago, at a cost of $8,-
500, it was situated on a quiet and
lovely street. But when the hospi-
tal began to expand, our street
was quiet and lovely no longer."
This fact, plus the consideration
of increasing maintenance costs
for the building, prompted the
move to a new area, Newman ex-
plained.
Hospital Money
"Between the money we will re-
ceive from the hospital for the old
lot and that which we will have
from our endowment fund, we will
be able to construct a new frater-
nity house at a cost of $250,000,
not including furnishings," he
added.
The new house is designed to
provide facilities for 45 men and
rooms for 30. Newman noted that
the unique form of the building
will include separate living quar-
ters for seniors in one 'wing and
juniors and sophomores in anoth-
er.
Newman explained that a local
firm is currently supervising con-
struction of the new house from
Tupper Takes
Editorial Post
Dr. C. J. Tupper, associate dean
of the Medical School, has been
appointed editor of the Journal of
the Michigan State Medical So-
ciety.
Dr. Tupper will take over the
post immediately, succeeding the
late Dr. Wilfred Haughey of Battle
Creek in the editorial position. Dr.
Tupper is also president-elect of
the Washtenaw County Medical
Society.

the conception stage to the work-
ing drawings. Contractors will sub-
mit bids as soon as these drawings
are completed, "hopefully before
the cold weather sets in." He
added that the estimated date of
completion for the project has
been set at Sept. 1, 1964.
Potter To Speak
To SNCC Group
Paul Potter, former national af-
fairs vice-president of the United
States National Student Associa-
tion, will be the featured speaker
at a mass meeting of the Friends
of the Student Non-violent Co-
ordinating Committee to be held at
8 p.m. today in Rm. 3G of the
Union.
SPECIAL
CAMPUS
RATES
Faculty
Magazine' Student Educator

Shelagh Delaney's provocative play
A TASTE OF HONEY

ORDER NOW FOR BEST SEATS!
an n
ARBR
thirty-fourth season
Dore Schary's drama of FDR
SUNRISE AT CAMPOBELLO
Oct. 3-5
The Rodgers & Hammerstein favorite
COKLAHOMA
Dec. 11-14

Jan. 30-Feb.

1

Time
Life'
Sports Illus.

4.00 yr. 7.00 yr.
8.00 2 yr. 14.00 3)
3.50 yr. 3:50 yr.
6.75 2 yr. 6.75 2 yr
5.00 yr. 5.00 yr.
8.50 2yr. 8.50 2yr

Newsweek 3.50 yr. 5.00 yr.

New Yorker

3.75 8 mo.8.00 yr.
5.00 yr.

William Gibson's stage & screen hit
THE MIRACLE WORKER
Mar. 19-21
Peter Ustinov's spoof on diplomacy
ROMANOFF AND JULIET
Apr. 16-18
All performances
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
SEASON TICKETS: Thurs. $6.00, Fri. or Sat. $7.00
Special group rate: 6 tickets for the price of 5
Mail coupon to: 1306 Prescott, Ann Arbor
ww-ww--- m- m-m-m- mw-w-www-wwwww-wmwminm awtmlmU
Please reserve season tickets for:
Thurs. ($6) Fri. ($7) Sat. ($7)
Total amount enclosedDate

l

Sat. Eve. Post 3.00 yr. 5.95 yr.

Fortune
Holiday

7.50 yr. 7.50 yr.
3.60 yr. 3.60 yr.

Mail your order now,
office. We'll bill when
your first issue.

or call our
you receive

STUDENT
PERIODICAL
AGENCY
Box 1161, Ann Arbor :
Phone 662-3061
Days or Evenings

Seat preference

Na me

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
. ..... :"..<:....::. n = e { . A i: :A

Address

(Please enclose stamped envelope if you wish tickets mailed to you.)

PLEASE note time schedule

.. ...
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- "'

INFORMATION ON
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS{
The Graduate School announces an open
meeting for undergraduate and graduate
students interested in graduate fellowships
for 1964-65.
Campus faculty representatives will explain
the major fellowship programs including:
University of Michigan Fellowships,
National Defense Education Act,
Rhodes, Marshall, Danforth,
National Science Foundation,
Woodrow Wilson, Fulbright-Hays,
and others
TUESDAY, SEPT. 17
3:30 P.M.
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar No. 93 - W.
Richard Bryan, director of management
development, Goodyear Time & Rubber
Company, Akron, Ohio, "Increasing the
Effectiveness of Business Decisions":
Third Floor Conference Room, Mich.
Union, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Debaters: Organizational meeting for
all students interested in debate and
forensics this evening, 7:30 p.m., in
2040 Frieze Bldg.
General Notces
French and German Screening Exams:
The screening examinations in French
and German for doctoral candidates will
be administered on Tues., Sept. 10 from
7 to 9 p.m. in Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Doctoral candidates must pass the
screening exams before taking the writ-
ten test in French or German. Anyone
who took the test on July 23 is ineligible
to take it at this administration.
Woodrow Wilson Fellows: Past andl
present, as well as campus representa-
tives and interested members of the
faculty are invited to a reception on!
Thurs., Sept. 12, in the West Conference'
Room, Rackham Bldg., at 4:10 p.m.
Wives or husbands are also welcome.
Application Forms for National Sci-
ence Foundation Cooperative Grad Fel-
lowships and Summer Fellowships for
Grad Teaching Assistants are now avail-
able in the Grad Fellowship Office,
Room 110, Rackham Bldg. These are
awarded by the National Science Foun-
dation for graduate study in Physical,
Biological and Engineering Sciences, and
in some areas of Medical and Social.
Sciences, and are for study in the aca-
denmic year 1964-65 and Summer Session
of 1964. Students are advised to consult
with their advisors or departmental
chairmen before making application,
to be certain that they meet the re-
quirements and minimum academic
standards for N.S.F. Fellowship pro-
grams.
Applications for Fulbright Awards for
Grad Study during the 1964-65 academic
year are now available. Countries in

which study grants are offered are
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium,
Brazil, Ceylon, Chile, Republic of China,
Colombia, Denmark, Finland, France,
Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala,
Iceland, India, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Ja-
pan, Korea, Mexico, Nepal, Netherlands,
New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Peru,
Philippines, Portugal, Spain, Sweden,
Turkey, United Arab Republic and the
United Kingdom. Grants arranged joint-
ly with the U.S. Government and the
following countries are also available:
Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa
Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador,
Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico,
Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Po-
land, Rumania and Venezuela. The
grants are made for one academic year
and include round-trip transportation,
tuition, a living allowance and a small
stipend for books and equipment. All
grants are made in foreign currencies.
Interested students who are U.S. citi-
z ens and hold an A.B. degree, or who
will receive such a degree by June,
1963, and who are presently enrolled in
the University of Michigan, should re-
quest application forms for a Fulbright
award at the Fellowship Office, Room
110, Graduate School. The closing date
for receipt of applications is October
21, 1963.
Persons not enrolled in a college or
university should direct inquiries and
requests for applications to the Insti-
tute of International Education, U.S
Student Program, 800 Second Ave., New
York 17, N.Y. The last date on which
applications will be issued by the Insti-
tute is Oct. 15, 1963.
Library Hours for Univ. Holidays:
1) The University recognizes the fol-
lowing holidays as Univ. holidays: In-
dependence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiv-
ing Day, Christmas Day, New Year's
Day, and Memorial Day. When one of
the above-mentioned holidays falls on
a Sun., it will usually be observed on
the following Mon. in accordance with
the law of the State of Michigan.
2) All libraries will be closed on the
days designated for observance of Inde-
pendence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving
Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day and
Memorial Day.
For Farm Fresh
DAIRY PRODUCTS
Prompt Home Delivery
Phone HU 3-0496
BELLA VISTA
FARMS, Inc.

3) The Gen. Lib. and the Undergrad
Lib. will close at 6:00 p.m. on the eve
of all holidays. The Divisional Libraries
will close at 5:00 p.m. except for the
Medical Center Library which will close
at 10 p.m.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
The Federal Service Entrance Exami-
nation will be given on Oct. 12. You
must apply by Sept. 19 for this exam.
Students are urged to apply early so
that all processing & employment inter-
viewing can be completed before gradua-
tion.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SA-
Summer Placement Service will open
Oct. 1. Office hours will be 10 a.m. to
12 noon and 1:30 to 5 p.m. Start looking
early for your summer job.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Vickers Incorporated-ME, IE, EE with
an advanced degree preferably in Bus.
Ad. Aerospace Graduate Trainee. Posi-
tions in engineering or closely allied
administrative field. One year program
including training in engineering, oper-
ations research, sales administration,
pricing, contracts admin., etc. Research
and Development center in Troy, Mich.
Scott Paper Co., Philadelphia, Pa.-
Consumers' Representatives. (Quality
Control.) BA with 0-3 yrs. exper. Two
year period of development-then oppor-
tunities in: Field Mktg., Indus. Rela-
tions, Procurement, and Traffic. Various
locations.
Management Consultant Firm (L-876)
-Assistant to Personnel Director. Age
to late 20's. Located 50 miles from Bos-
(Continued on Page 8)

ONLY

HOWS DAILY!

DIAL 5-6290
at 1:00-4:40
8:00 P.M.

"It is in the tradition of 'BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI' and 'GUNS OF
NAVARONE' - a genre which might be the most distinctive area of
American movie making in the past decade. No other country could have
made the movie quite so well. Therefore its selection as the American
entry in the Moscow Film Festival is particularly appropriate."
-Kansas City Star

3S

Week Day
Matinees
Until 5 P.M.
All Seats 75c

Nights and
Sunday
Adults $1.00

Note: We just received producer's wired O.K. to holdover this weekend.

VENOM

r i

Coming This Wednesday . .
The Michigan Daily
MAGAZINE
THE WORLD OF JAMES BALDWIN
By Marilyn Koral
THE POETRY OF PASTERNAK
By Richard Sheldon

DIAL 8-6416 j
"Unqualifiedly a Masterpiece"
-David Zimmerman
Michigan Daily
"Brilliant . .. Masterwork"
-N.Y. Herald Tribune
"Fascinating"
-N.Y. Times
FEDERICO
FELLINI'S
8 Y
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
SHOWS AT 6:45 and 9 P.M.

1.

II

DIAL " ENDING WEDNESDAY 0
2-6264 Shows at 1:15-3:10
5:00-7:00 and 9:05
Surf's up and the Beach is really swinging!
40--
s"-" .- KAOB-CUMMINGS
DOROTAY FR8NKI "ANNOII6"
.y: MLN -AV N FUNICLL0 , s-

I

r

'I

Continuous Saturday
and Sunday from 1 P.M.

I

I

ALL SEATS $1.00

I

11

**

I

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