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September 08, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1963

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 8. 198~

F

DAM HURON?:
Group To Give Water Study

New Sight on Old Site

a I

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Across
Campus

-1

By RAYMOND HOLTON
A special committee, appointed
five years ago to study problems
of the Huron River watershed, will
present part of its findings to a
seven-man House committee Mon-
day morning.
- A. E.'Wolter, vice-chairman of
the Huiton River Watershed Inter-

government Committee, explained
yesterday that the Ann Arbor
area's water supply is in danger
due to excessive runoff in the
early spring and the growing pop-
ulation in the area.
Since the committee was ap-
pointed by the Washtenaw Coun-
ty Board of Supervisors, it has

s

ARTS AND LETTERS:

Herbert Lauds Wagner,
Cites Growth of Opera

* By JOHN BRYANT
Wagnerian opera still is enjoy-
ing tremendous popularity in
America, but it faces the problem
of a language barrier in reaching
its audiences, according to Prof.
Ralph Herbert of the music school.
Prof. Herbert, who sang in last
year's touring performance of "Die,
Meistersinger," cites this opera as
an example of the language prob-
lem.
"In New York, the Metropolitan
Opera continues to stage Wagner,
even though its head admittedly is
not a Wagner addict, because of
the tremendous box-office success
his works receive.
"Although we no longer have
Lauritz Melchoir and Kirstin Flag-
stad, there are other artists such
as Jerome Hines, Jon Vickers,
Irene Bahlis, Birgit Nilsson, and
Hans Hopf who can satisfy the
demands made upon a Wagnerian
singer," he adds.
However, Wagner is at a disad-
vantage in America because of the
language barrier, he notes. "It is
difficult to ask an audience to sit
through six hours of 'Parsifal'
without understanding a single
word."
Translation, although useful in
some works, does not seem to be
the answer where Wagner is con-
cerned, according to Prof. Herbert.
The task is tremendously difficult
due to the complexity of Wagner's
librettos.

"Wagner did not write his operas
completely in modern German,,
Prof. Herbert explains. "When he
described historical scenes occur-
ring in the 16th century, he would
use 16th century German. Fur-
thermore, his use of weird rhymes
and words not found in any dic-
tionary makes a faithful transla-
tion extremely difficult."
Prof. Herbert also feels that
Wagnerian plots may be too far
removed from modern life to
achieve immortality. In his opin-
ion, "Die Meistersinger" is Wag-
ner's only eternal work, its bick-
ering townsmen being closer to our
realm of experience than the Norse
gods and Rhine maidens of his
other works.
Wagner is not remaining com-
pletely static, however. In Bay-
reuth, Germany, the site of Wag-
ner's triumphs, his grandsons are
stripping many of the elaborate
props and costumes from the pro-
ductions in an effort to stream-
line them.
"It is difficult to predict the
future of Wagner in America,"
he concludes. "Those of us -in this
country hope that in the next few
years, American opera will begin
to come to the fore. Whether Wag-
nerian opera can compete with
operas which all can understand is

conducted a comprehensive study
of the problem with the aid of
University researchers and the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The
Corps of Engineers was allotted
$50,000 by the federal government
for its part in the study.
Recommends Dams
Wolter said the watershed com-
mittee believes.the water carried
by the Huron River should be
impounded and released gradu-
ally. This, he said, can be done
by the use of dams placed in the
upper regions of the Huron River.
University researchers on the
committee include Prof. Lyle E.
Craine of the Natural Resources
School, and Prof. William J.
Pierce of the Law School.
Robert Carpenter, director of
the Washtenaw County Planning
Commission, explained that the
watershed committee wants the
legislators to propose a bill en-
abling legislation. for local man-
agement of water basins.
The seven-man House commit-
tee has been touring the state
water basins between legislative
sessions. This interim committee
studies the problems of each basin.
Local Handling
The watershed committee is
composed of 32 governmental
units, from townships to counties
situated in the Huron River basin.
He said five major reports will
be presented to the legislators and
a special movie of the Huron River
area is scheduled to be shown at
the meeting.
Members of the watershed com-
mittee i n c l u d e representatives
from Wayne and Macomb coun-
ties, downriver communities, Belle-
ville and area townships. There
are 32 members on the committee.
Carpenter said he was in hopes
enabling legislation would be
passed in the next regular session
of the Legislature.
CivilServ iceas
To Hold Tests
The United States Civil Service
Cqmmission is now accepting ap-
plications for the 1964 Federal
Service Examination.
The examination is open to col-
lege seniors and graduates who
are interested in a career in the
Federal Service.
Details concerning requirements
and positions to be filled are
available from post offices, Civil
Service regional offices and col-
lege placement offices..
The closing date for applicants
is April 14, 1964. Tests will be
given on seven different dates
beginning next month.
For management internships
only, applicants must file by Jan.
16, 1964.

The University television series
"Speak Up" will feature a pro-
gram on "Getting Ideas Across"
at 7:30 a.m. todey on Channel 7.
Role of Money . ..
Prof. Thomas Gies of the busi-
ness school will discuss "The Role
of Money" at 8 a.m. today on
Channel 7 in the University tele-1
vision series "T h e InquiringI
Mind."
Peace Corps ...
Peace Corps officials Harold G.
Tuft~, and John D. Rockefeller IV
will discuss their organization
with Prof. Arthur Mendel of the
history department at 9 a.m. to-
day on Channel 7 in k University
television production.
Images of America .*
"Conflict and Conformity" will
be the subject of the final program
in the University television series
"Images of America."
Gilbert and Sullivan .. .
The Gilbert and Sullivan Society
will hold a mass meeting at 7:30
p.m. today in the Michigan Union
for the purpose of finding people
to work on this year's production.
Conservation . ..ar
Prof. William H. Wake, chair-
man of the department of geog-
raphy at the University of South-
ern California, will speak on con-
servation at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
in Rm. 1040 Natural Resources
Bldg.

DIAL 8-6416
HELD
OVER!
"Unqualifiedly a Masterpiece"
-David Zimmerman
Michigan Daily
"Brilliant . .. Masterwork"
-N.Y. Herald Tribune
"Fascinating"
-N.Y. Times
FEDERICO
FELLINI'S
8 V
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
SHOWS AT 6:45 and 9 P.M.

I

I

r-ih'fL'I pi
DIAL 5-6290
PLEASE NOTE:
3 ONLY
SHOWS
DAILY
at 1:30-4:40-8:00 P.M.
"THE GREAT ESCAPE" is a
great film in its awn right. It
thrills, excites and amuses without
sacrificing itself to a happy end-
ing. "The Great Escape" is a great
adventure.
-Hugh Holland
Michigan Daily

t
I

I

I

_ Continuous Saturday
and Sunday from 1 P.M.

1

-Daily-Richard Steiner
NO MORE ZOO-University students who used to visit the
campus's small zoo will find the location transformed into the
building site for the new biosystematics addition to the Museum
of Zoology. The construction, begun last spring, is the only
building project currently in progress on the central campus.
LEADERSHIP, LOYALTY:
Van Riper Enumerates
Benefits of Fraternities

ALL SEATS $1.00

STURGES,,"THE-
STEVE JAMES RICHARD
MCQUEEN GARNER AITENBOROUGH
COLOR& J. ANA VISION

I

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

1

Week Day
Matinee .75

Nights
&Sun. $1.00

ti

a question that
swer."

only time will an-I

Il i II II 'iIIII III U'' I u '
Q~
FRTENTIS A .MIHGAw

By BURTON MICHAELS
The fraternity system is not
declining, but offers Greeks def-
inite advantages, Prof. Paul P.
Van Riper of Cornell University
told the second annual Fraternity
Officers Conference yesterday.
That the system is gaining in
membership and scholarship is
evidenced by the fact that the
total number of chapters in
America has doubled since World
War II, that the number of na-
tionals with over 100 chapters has
increased from six to 11 since the
war, and that the percentage of
fraternity systems whose grade-
point averages are higher than
all-men's averages has risen from
40 to 50 during this period, he
said.
Among advantages of fraternity
life he cited were leadership qual-
ities, evidenced by his Army ex-
periences where Greeks proved
better leaders, group association
and lifelong loyalties and friend-
ships.
To further strengthen the sys-
tem, Prof. Van Riper suggested
that fraternities make the faculty

more acquainted with the nature
of fraternity life, through such
programs as faculty speakers.
Prof. Van Riper is the repre-
sentative of the National Inter-
fraternity C o u n c i I scholarship
committee to the NIFC executive
committee, and general secretary
of Beta Theta Pi national frater-
nity.
Lehman Notes
The University has rented tem-
porary space for the offices of the
education school dean and of the
Center for the Study of Higher
Education on the second floor of
the Ann Arbor Bank Bldg. at South
and East University, Prof. Charles
F. Lehman, assistant to the edu-
cation school dean, said yesterday.
The offices will be moved to
permanent locations pending Uni-
versity construction of office
space, probably within about two
to five years, Prof. Lehman said.

Evenings & Sunday-$1 .00
Weekday Matinees
Till 5 PM. .-75c
~s calledj

DIAL 2-6264
3 Ilr T II

Shows Start at 1:15
3:10-5:00-7:00 and 9:05

f
t

tI

- . . a lo
ppt ALSO STAFLFUNG AND FEA1lRoNG -
/ + ; fieRVeY JODY JOHN MORBY EVA DCKDaO e
A N 1jMOK- M COR AH Y MSTeRD8M MS1X AMS
NEXT! CESAR ROMERO in "THE CASTILIAN"

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN.
"':".4 ...1..: .A AN:. ....x.-..."......."...."......{.}..,......:.""A~r V.... . ..1: ....v.'':rk..A....v......A..A. .....A. .... e:.v w."Y.V".:;...::

Signup
Rushing Period

Sept.

5 9 Union & Diag
September 8 19

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
officialpublication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
* u blication.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER S
Day 'Calendar
Cinema 'Guild --:Ingmar Bergman's
"Wild-Strawberries"; also "The Getto
Pillow": Architecture Aud., 7:00 and 9:00
p.m.
Events
Meeting of Naval Reserve: Naval Re-
serve Research Company 9-3 will meet
on Sept. 9, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in North
Hall. The discussion, "Research and
Development at the National Level and
in -the Dept. of Defense," will be sup-
plemented by a movie. Naval Reserve of-
ficers'interested in joining the unit are
invited to attend.
Lecture: Dr. Paul Halmos, from the
Univ. of Keele, Staffordshire, England,
will speak on "Faith of Counselors" in
-Aud. C, Angell Hall from 3 to 5 p.m..
on. Tues., Sept. 10. Sponsored by the
Mental Health.,Research Institute.
Debate and Forensics Squad Meeting
for prospective members Tues., Sept.
10, at 7:30 p.m. in 2040 Frieze Bldg. For
Information, contact K. E. Andersen, 2526
Frieze, Ext. 2296.,
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Foreign Policy Association, New York,
N.Y.-Seeking Ass't. Regional Director
for hdqts. in Boulder, Colo. Should
have substantial knowledge of the field
of international affairs, gained through
formal educ. and/or exper.; and demon-
strated ability to carry out work in
the area of community rels., pref. with
extensive exper, working with communi-
ty organizations. Exper. dealing with
the news media is highly desirable.
The Center on Problem Drinking, Du-
luth, Minn.--Seeking Executive Director..
MA plus 4 yrs. field exper. in Social

Work. Exper. with treatment of alco-
holics pref. Admin., Educ., Counseling
& correlation with related agencies &
volunteer workers involved.
Paragon Homes, Mineola, N.Y.-Seek-
ing recent grads in the field of Bus.
Ad. or Marketing who would be in-
terested in a sales management career
to enter Training Program. After 6 mos-.
training will either be assigned to an-
other area in the East or Midwest for
additional 3-mo. training period, or
will return as Sales Manager of our
franchised Distributorships in the im-
mediate home area of the candidate.
Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co., Toledo,
Ohio-Opening involving optical design
of various quality measuring instru-
ments, TV-scanning devices for glass
inspection along with other optical de-
velopment assignments related to glass
manufacture. BS, MS or PhD Physics
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Fall Semester shduld reg-
ister by Sept. 24, 1963. Forms available,
1011 Student Activities Bldg.
If you wish to be listed in the Student
Directory, please give the president's
name, address and telephone number to
Miss C. Bilakos, 1011 SAB by- Sept. 16,
1963.

with concentration in the optics field.
Optical exper. desirable but not essen-
tial.
U.S. Army Engineer Dist., Detroit -
Seeking Economist. Bachelor's with ma-
jor in Econ. & 3 yrs. exper.
Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. -
Opening for a graduate Chemical Engnr.
in Process Development labs.
Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo,
Calif.-Industrial Hygienists to partici-
pate in program of protecting the health
of employes engaged in the construc-'
tion, repair & refueling of nuclear pow-
ered submarines. BA or MA.
City of Albuquerque, New Mexico -
Administrative Intern. BA in Govern-
ment, Bus. Ad., Soc., Psych. or Econ. &
must have completed the course work
toward a MA degree.
'Management Consultants in Mass. -
1) Account Executive-Experienced Ac-
count Exec. who must have bkgd. in
the advertising agency field & account
work in New England. Boston location.
Age late 20's to late 30's. 2) Systems &
Procedures, EDP-Proven bkgd. in Digi-
tal. Tape Systems. 1 opening in Boston
& 1 in Hartford.
Cleco Air Tools, Houston, Texas-In-
dustrial Salesmen. College grads with
good Mechanical comprehension. If
possible, exper. selling portable pneu-
matic torque- controlled tools or related
equipment. Could begin as Sales
Trainees-degree from Business or En-
grg. schools.
For further information, please call
General Div.,:Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.

4

PRESENTS
LAST TIMES TONIGHT at 7 and 9
INGMAR BERGMAN''S
MASTERPIECE
WILD STRAWBERRIES
Bergman's distinguished dramatic study of
the philosophy and memories of an old man.
With Victor Sjorstrand, Bibi Andersson.
Plus Short: THE GHETTO PILLOW
NEXT WEEK
Kurasowa's MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
s._ s g L ~ U w~w t . L~u * C

r

Circle Honorary Soc., Picnic, Sept. 8,
1 p.m., Island Park. Meet at League.
* * *
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Org.,
6 p.m. Supper, 6:45 p.m. Panel "Making
Bull Sessions Constructive," 1511 Wash-
tenaw.
* **

cI

PANHELLENI

IC

ASSOC

IATION presents

a

Lutheran Student Chapel, Sept. 8, 7
p.m., Hill St. at S. Forest Ave. Speaker:
Dr. Arvor Lohela, Flint, "University Life
-A Time of Exploration."
* * *
Congr. Disciples E & R Student Guild,
Study action dinner, Sept. 9, 5:30 p.m.,
802 Monroe; Graduate Group Study,
Sept. 8, 7:30 p.m., Prof. W. Hewson, 10
Harvard Pl.

r

-

-9

I

The Gilbert & Sullivan Society
is proud to announce that the
distinguished Japanese minstrel-philosopher, l
Go-To, will be present
c 1-- ~ ~ a-m ~-m qp(

Saturday, Sept. 14

8:30 P.M.

Hill Auditorium

"
eNnarevi +;t*%L im+c ^n cr ital

t

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