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January 12, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

usk Lifts U.S. Promise
f No Invasion into Cuba

PRE-GENEVA PARLEY:
Announces Joint Plan
For Test Ban Talks
WASHINGTON ()-The United States and, Russia have agreed
to hold informal talks in New York next week to explore possibilities
for a nuclear test ban, United States sources reported yesterday..
The head of the United States Disarmament Agency, William C.
Foster, is to represent the United States at the New York discussions.
Soviet Disarmament Negotiator Semyon K. Tsarapkin is expected to
be the Russian representative. For-"
mal announcement of the talks is rwo
expected shortly after w ord of fin- e d l a r e e t y M s o.Ge e a C n e en eB a t e in ,
al agreement by Moscow. e
Geneva Conference BP k u
The forthcoming discussions in
advance of the Feb. 12 reconven-
ing of the 17-nation disarmament On War Policy
conference in Geneva rased some
hopes in Washington that real The American Communist Party
progress might at last be made in for the first time expressed major
the long-stalemated issue of atom- public criticism of Communist
ic testing. China's "erroneous and dangerous"
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev attitude on nuclear war and the
and President John F. Kennedy Cuban crisis, while praising the
have suggested, in 'broad terms, policy of "peaceful co-existence"
that settlement of the Cuban cris- espoused by Soviet Premier Nikita
ip can pave the way for progress S. Khrushchev.
toward disarmament and nuclear
test-ban agreements. - The American party also reiter-
However, United States authori- ated its position in favor of peace-
ties say the Soviets have as yet ful transition to Socialism and
- shown no sign of abandoning their "unity of the socialist sector" of
1 opposition to on-site inspection as the world in a party news release.
E a means of policing an arms cut The party attributed prevention
accord. Neither is the United of nuclear war over Cuba to the
s States abandoning its demands for "firm policy of peaceful co-exist-
- such inspection, they say. The ence applied flexibly and correct-
atomic test-ban discussions which ly by the Soviet Union," and to
s have been going on since 1958 the "peace policy of the Cuban
repeatedly have floundered on this people and their government." It
t issue. charged the United States with
Disarmament Talks "aggressive and unilateral brink-
Disarmament appears to have manship."
been the principal topic discussed Triggering the condemnation
with Soviet Deputy Foreign Min- was a Communist Chinese editor-
. ister Vasily V. Kuznetsov during lal in the Washington Post ac-
his two-day Washington stay. cusing Khrushchev of "a Munich."
v Kuznetsov had his final meet- The American Communist Party
- ing with United States officials termed the Chinese stand "psuedo-
yesterday. left dogmatism."

To Prohibit.
Harassment
Of Meredith
OXFORD, Miss. (R)-University
of Mississippi officials warned
yesterday they would not tolerate
any further demonstrations in the
campus cafeteria against Negro
student James H. Meredith.
After three nights when students
hooted and jeered at Meredith as
he ate supper at the cafeteria,
Dean of Students L. L. Love told
the student body that further out-+
breaks in the cafeteria would lead
to disciplinary action.
The statement was issued only
hours after an unnamed Justice
Department spokesman in Wash-
ington accused university officials
of failing to maintain proper dis-
cipline on campus.
Asks Change in Atmosphere
The nightly demonstrations
started after Meredith announced
he would not return, to the uni-
versity next semester unless the
atmosphere became "more condu-
cive to learning."
Meanwhile, the powerful stu-
dent judicial council held an un-
scheduled meeting to consider
charges against a student appre-
hended after last night's demon-
stration.
Meredith, meanwhile, said he
planned to stay on campus last
night and possibly for the re-
mainder of the weekend.
Police Patrol
Shortly before the opening of
the cafeteria, campus security po-
lice turned out in reinforced num-
bers.
Earlier, Chancellor J. D. Wil-
liams, speaking out at about the
same time as the Justice Depart-
ment spokesman was criticizing
the university, said the latest se-
ries of demonstrations was Mere-
dith's own fault.
"We were getting along quietly
and normally," said Williams,
"then Meredith saw fit to give a
press conference in- which he im-
plied that students and others
were not doing what they should."
The student was suspended last
night for taking part in a dem-
onstration against Meredith by the
judicial council. The suspension is
effective until the 1963.fall term.

By ELLEN SILVERMAN
Although the British press ex-
ploded against the Conservative
government when Prime Minister
Harold Macmillan signed the Nas-
sau pact giving Britain the Po-
laris missile in place of the Sky-
bolt, the pact is very favorable to
the British, Prof. Harold K. Jacob-
son of the political science depart-
ment commented recently.
Prof. Jacobson pointed out that
although from 1957 to 1960 Britain
seemed to be a rising nuclear pow-
er, it became apparent after 1960
that Britain could not support an
independent missile program. (The
British were planning to build a
system of Blue Streak missiles.)
Nuclear Folly
London presswriters called the
pact "The Sellout" and charged in
large headlines, "Macmillan's Nu-
clear Folly," "Macmillan's Sur-
render" and "We Dinna Want Po-
laris." But the Skybolt (an air to
land missile fired from a manned
aircraft) might be considered
symbolic of Britain's decline; he
said.

BRITISH UNHAPPY:
Jacobson Lauds Polaris Pact

PROF. HAROLD JACOBSON
*. . Polaris missiles
"Britain is in the process of be-
coming a small power," Prof. Jac-
obson contended. The British Af-

Jurists Censure Unions
For Newspaper Strike

NEW YORK (P)--A fact-finding
panel of three jurists last night
strongly censured the leaders of a
striking printers union for the five
week newspaper blackout in New
York City.'
The panel accused the printers
of shutting down the papers, then
sitting back to await their sur-
render to union contract demands
in the face of threatened extinc-
tion.
"Indeed," the report read, "it
must be said that there has been
no real bargaining. A strike was
called as a preliminary to bar-
gaining - bargaining was intend-
ed to be postponed for a long
period until the strike had taken
its toll."
The Dec. 8 strike of 3,000 AFL-
CIO International Typographical
Union printers led to the shut-
down of all nine major New York
newspapers, and threw nearly 20,-
000 employes out of work. The

papers normally print 5.5 million
copies daily.
The fact-finders said the print-
ers were not driven to strike as a
last resort, but that their walkout
was "the deliberate design formed
by the printers' representatives as
the opening gambit in negotia-
tions."
The findings of the fact-finding
board were in no way binding on
either the ITU printers or the
New York publishers. However,
the report was expected to focus
public attention on the issues, in
the hope of settling the 35-day
strike.

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CiJRCI

ON 1l
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets,
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Mosses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Mosses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, x:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosory and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8 :. Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.

rHE

SAB BAT H

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11 :00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Misouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Progman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:15: Narrative Com-
munion Services, with explanation of the
Liturgy
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:15: Bible Study
Groups
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delto, Lutheran Stu-
dents, Supper-Program, with talk by the
Pastor, "Sex Problems In The Light Of
Scripture."
Tuesday at 6:00: Married Students' Potluck
Supper.
Wednesday at 10:00 P.M.: Midweek Devotion
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate
Sunday-9:30 and 11:00 A.M. Worship
Services
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
7:00 P.M. Lutheran Student Association
Wednesday-7:15-7:45 P.M. Vesper Service

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
andWESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 and 1 1 :15 o.m.-Morning Worship.
Advent Gospel, "The Good News of Love,"
sermon by Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOIA
(1290 a.m., 102.9 F.M.) 11:15 a.m.-
12:15 P.M.)
10:15 a.m.-Seminor, Pine Room. "Encounter
With Living Religions," final session.
"Face of American Origin."
7:00 p.m.-"Baha'i Faith and World Peace."
Worship and Program, Lounge.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
Followed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev, James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Discussion "The Morality of
Romance" Chapter 9 in Conscience on
Campus
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
6:45 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship. Service of Communion
MONDAY
12:00 noon Lunch and Discussion
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Avenue
NO 2-44664
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckordt and Potricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
John G. Malcin, Minister
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAY

10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
6:30 p.m.

Bible School
Regular Worship
Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY

7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756

THE SALVATION ARMY
Religious services every Sunday
220 E. Washington
Sunday School-10:00 a.m.
Holiness Service.-11:00 a.m.
Evangelistic Service-7:15 p.m.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Washtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon topic for Sunday, January 13,
1963 will be "Roman Catholicism: An Ap-
praisal."
Dr. Goede, the minister, will speak.
Services and Church School are at 9:30 and

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
"70 HAPPY PERSONS," Dr. Fred E. Luchs
Bible Lecture, 10:20, Mrs. Luchs
CHURCH SCHOOL, 9:30 & 11:00 a.m.,
crib-9th grade

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