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December 20, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-20

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. DECE ER 2ii_ IMI

PAGETWOTHE ICHGAN AIJ

...,A..,Ati Z, i tR,.4i5.AS.J-V 4V, A01)4

CONFLICT TERMS:
Poulos Notes News 'Weapon'

Hicks Reveals Figures
On Travel for Research

PHARMACEUTICAL USES:
Milosovich Studies Crystal Applications

r.;

By MARTHA MACNEAL
sues now without being confused
Men are pugnacious animals, by Communism," Poulos said.
and reporters too often see all in- "The older generation is hampered
ternational events solely in terms by a belief that only fools have big
of conflict," Constantine Poulos, ideas."
editor and publisher of the James- #He stressed that "man for the
town Sun, said yesterday. first time finds himself facing no
Speaking on "International longer the forces of nature, but
News, a Weapon for World Peace," only himself. The resultant mood
Poulos regretted his choice of the of fear is exploited by some, caus-
word 'weapon,' particularly in the ing national frustration, insecurity
context of the approaching new and confusion."
year. Equa Respnsbility
Citing our age of "swift, violent, Eua sponsiby
and sweeping change," he de- "But," he continued, "the re-
scribed the new generation suc- sponsibility does not lie only with
ceeding the Kennedy generation. the racists and jingoists - we
Desegregation, Sputnik must also be concerned with our-
These younger people were born selves."
after World War II into the is- The unpracticed eye, Poulos
sues of the Supreme Court" 1954 noted, sees world events as a vast,
school desegregation decision and unregulated explosion, encourag-
Sputnik. ing extremist expressions. Jour-
"They sprang uninhibited into nalists tend to fall into "inaccur-
the moral questions of segregation ate, unfair reporting" when they
and peace. Their advantage is that publicize such sensationalism ex-
they can take stands on these is- tensively.
Valdez Cites Cuban Success
In worker-Militia Control

This tendency to write news in
terms of conflict "follows the line
of the sports page - 'though the
home team lost, the score did not
reflect the team's real quality.' "
Poor Reporting

By ELIZABETH ROEDIGER
No government based on a work-
er-militia like Cuba can become,
a tyranny over those workers,
Peter Valdez said Tuesday.
The Cuban revolution has, in
fact, been so successful that its
overthrow now would require an
outward invasion, he commented
"let other nations have workers'
militias and see if they become
tyrannies."
Speaking to the Socialist Club,
Valdez noted that everything the
press says to make Cuba appear,
a dictatorship must be pushed,
aside.
Much Success
Unfortunately the United States
press campaign to make American
citizens hate Cuba has been "very
successful," he added.
The average American who
never knew anything about Cuba,
now hates Cubans enough to go
down and fight them, he explain-
ed.
In Venezuela there are police in
the factories, and "a man can be
imprisoned for even quoting Cas-
tro in the streets." Cuba seems
wonderful to Venezuelan workers
because there workers are free,
Valdea said.
The governments of Central
Parties Sponsored
By IFC, Panhel
Interfraternity Council and Pan-
hellenic Association co-sponsored
with several University fraterni-
ties and sororities a series of chil-
dren's Christmas parties last week-
end, during which an IFC Santa
Claus distributed favors and toys
to underprivileged children.
*1 V
o~p -- 9

America are nothing but tyran-
nies supported by the government
of the United States; eventually
the United States will do to Latin
America what France (with
American support) did to Algeria,
Valdez said.
With the workers of Latin
America living in slums, with up-
wards of 50 per cent unemployed,
the question of revolution in Latin
America is only a matter of time,
he noted.
These workers are ready to
support such a revolution seeing
Castro could, do it only ninety,
miles from the United States.
Liberal Culture
United States schools had always
taught that Communism is in-
compatable in the liberal Western
culture (before the Cuban revolu-
tion), but in the Venezuelan slums
"no one could be paid to post
anti-Communist literature," Val-
dez commented.
He explained that in Latin
America "Communist parties are
not out to make revolutions, but
to make way for national, not
American, capitalism.
In Cuba the Communists
thought ta first that Batista would
accomplish this.
Major Split
But the Communist parties have
degenerated, Valdez said, and pre-
dicted that within the next few
years there would be a split in
every major Communist party, be-
tween those who seek a national
capitalism and those who hope
to create Cuban-type socialism.
Commenting on the Cuban
crisis, Valdez stated that Cuba
does not trespass over United
States boundaries, nor does she
claim the right to a military base
on United States soil, or plan. in-
vasions against the United States
or demand the permission to sta-
tion troopsin the United States.
Yet when she asks the United
States to negotiate on Guantan-
amo or the recent mobilization of
infantry, she is called aggressive,
and the United States claims that
Communism is not negotiable.
Group To Present
Children's Opera
As a Christmas bonus for Ann
Arbor youngsters and their famil-
ies, "Hansel and Gretel" will be
presented at 2 p.m. and 4:15 p.m.
Saturday at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre by the Dramatic Arts
Center. The Humperdinck opera
will be staged by the Cleveland
Institute of Music and sung in
English.

Poulos feels that the smaller,
neutral nations of the world are
rarely well reported. "We need toj
take into account their various
differences in background and
opinion in order to reflect inter-
national affairs accurately."
He deplored the fact that "a
greater sense of nationalism exists
among journalists today than did
between the world wars. This hass
resulted in the badgering of for-r
eign officials about the current
American line, so that reporting
lacks the flow of history, and cre-
ates a sense of confusion and in-
stability."1
As an example, Poulos cited the
period preceding World War II.
Foreign correspondents were per-I
ceptive; they were known not as
reporters, but as authors of pop-
ular books. The news reading pub-
lic was not stirred to any sense
of involvement, and the bulk of1
newswriting was devoted to sports1
and murder trials.
Sensational News
Immediate sensation was pre-
ferred to stories with long-range
significance, and day-to-day items
were either ignored or buried on
inside pages.
"We need young newspapermen
who have passion, who are not
embarrassed by moral premises,
and who are not afraid to test
themselves against the world,"
Poulos concluded.
Study Views
Gifted Child
Prof. Warren A. Ketchum of
the education school, director of
the University's studies on the
gifted child, has found that gifted.
students who enter college at 16
or 17 years old do better aca-
demically than those who enter
at the customary age of '18 years
According to a recent Detroit
Free Press article, the problem is;
getting these students into college
early. One of the most important
programs is the Advance Place-
ment Program which allows a high,
school student to take some col-,
lege courses along with his regular
work. If the student is able to,
pass the college board examina-
tion, he will receive credit for thel
advanced work done in high
school.
The University will give a stu-
dent credit for a course he skipped
or test him for advanced place-'
ment even though he hasn't taken
the advanced placement course in
high school.

By ARNOLD PROSTAK
In 1961-62 travelers on spon-
sored research projects made 4,500
trips and were reimbursed $462,000
from the University for their trav-
el expenses, according to spon-
sored research business manager
Aubrey Hicks.
The University, in turn, was re-
imbursed by the project sponsors
--in most cases an agency of the
federal government.
Many of these travelers took ad-
vantage of the services offered by
the Sponsored Research Travel
Office.
Issues Tickets
"Although the travel office is
not a travel agency, we issue plane
tickets and make hotel and ren-
tal car reservations for travelers
on sponsored research projects,"
Hicks said. "Although travelers'
can make their own arrangements,
they find that our staff can often
help them," he said.
"Our knowledge of the limita-
tions on travel exepenses written
into the various sponsored re-
search contracts minimizes the
problem of expenses that are dis-
allowed and not reimbursed by
the sponsoring agency," he con-
tinued.

AUBREY HICKS
... .reports statistics

The travel office has an airline
charge account, so that the trav-
eler does not have to pay cash for
his ticket. In addition, the travel
offices are conveniently located
for most travelers, according to
Hicks.

By MICHAEL HYMAN
Since 1956, Prof. George Milo-
sovich of the pharmacy college
has been working on two aspects
of crystals and their pharmaceu-
tical applications.
One of these is the search for a
better tablet-making process. The
other is an attempt to increase
the efficiency of drugs in their
dosage form.
Tablets are powders compressed
in dies. Some drugs compress
readily and form tablets. Others
compress, but, when taken out of
the die, fall apart. Wet granula-
tion solves this problem.
Doughy Mass
The drug is moistened with
water, starch paste or acacia
syrup, and then the doughy mass
is forced through coarse screens;
a granular substance results, in
which the particles are in random
orientation. These granules must
then be dried and rescreened.
However, the process is costly
and inefficient. Prof. Milosovich's
work is designed to eliminate the
wet granulation steps by effecting'
changes in the (solid state) habit
or shape of a crystal. One of the
properties of powders important
in the tableting operation is its
flow characteristic.
If the flow of powder is poor, in-
complete filling of the tablet die
results and a non-uniform product
is produced. This property is de-
pendent upon both particle size
and shape.
Low Pressures
Prof. Milosovich feels that the
determining factor is the crystal's
ability to deform plastically at
relatively low pressures. (Plastic
deformation is analagous to met-
allic ductility.) This depends on
the number of dislocations or dis-
ruptions of the crystal lattice: the
more disruptions, the better flow,
he said.
He believes that the conditions
of crystallization determine the
YR's Deplore Act
of Food Stoppage
The executive boards of the
Young Republicans Club issued a
statement yesterday deploring the
action of "a certain Southern
county which has allegedly with-
held federal food grants from the.
Negro population who qualify for
such aid."

number of such dislocations: The
faster the crystallization, the less
oriented the molecules in the crys-
tals, and hence, the more disloca-
tions.
The effort to omit wet granula-
tion in tablet production is im-
portant because granulation, be-
sides being costly, has had adverse
effects on some drugs.
Drug Efficiency
The second half of the research
deals with the efficiency of some
drugs in their dosage form. When
one swallows a drug in tablet form,
that drug must first dissolve in
the intestinal fluids, be absorbed
into the blood and then flow to
one of three spots: the excretory
system, a depot which is composed
of tissue that absorbs or neutral-

Scientists Ready Moho Test;
Couch Works on Committee

DALY
1201 S. University
Our Specialties are:
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izes the drug, or to the "site of ac-
tion," the place where the drug
has its effect.
The problem is to maintain the
drug concentration in the blood
above a certain minimum level, so
sufficient drug will go to the site
of action and be effective, Prof.
Milosovich said.
To do this, the water solubility
of the drug must be fairly high.
Manydrugs do not have this prop-
erty.
Prof. Milosovich believes that;
through modification of the crys-
tal lattice of a drug, he can raise
its solubility without altering its
chemical properties.
A big problem is the individual
variance in the body's reception of
the drug, he concluded.

STARTS
TONIGHT

DIAL
8-6416

(Continued from Page 1)
ton converted sea-going Navy
barge controlled its progress.
The main purpose of this dril-
ling was to test procedures and
equipment, and no attempt was
made to reach the Moho. It was
discovered that the project would
be far more difficult than first
anticipated.
One problem facing the scien-
tists and engineers is that of the
platform drifting. "Propellers will
be used to hold the barge or ship.
against the wind and waves,"
Prof. Couch said.
CUSS I had four propellers
connected to a central control
panel to govern its drift. A sonar
positioning system was used to
watch the relation between the
ship and the drill.
Describes Equipment
"We are going to use an auto-
matic positioning system for the
deep drilling. The ship can drift in
a circle of no more than 500 feet
in diameter. With such a long
distance from the ship to the
ocean floor, a certain amount of
bending of the drill shaft can
take place," Prof. Couch noted.
At present, the sub-committee
is undecided on what kind of
platform to use for the drilling.
"It may be a new ship, an old one
remodeled or a platform floated
on cylinders 50 feet in diameter,"
he said.

At its meeting, the sub-
committee discussed preliminary
designs and cost estimates pre-
pared by the contractor for the
possible drilling platforms.
Behind Time
"We hope to make a decision
soon. We are behind right now
and the beginning of the deep
drilling is a year or more away,"
Prof. Couch said.
The members of the sub-com-
mittee in charge of selecting the
platform design receive no pay.
Prof. Couch is the only faculty
member from a university work-
ing on the platform design.
The Moho Project is spon-
sored by industry and the govern-
ment. A 43.6 million contract for
the next five years has been
signed with a Houston contractor.

DURING THE HOLIDAYS MAKE SUMMER PLANS
Lisle Programs in Human Relations
EUROPE-Germany, USSR
WEST INDIES--Jamaica
LATIN AMERICA-Colombia, Bolivia,
USA-California, Washington D C, Michigan
Phone: Univ. ext. 2077 or
See: Baldwin, room 2282, S.A.B.

The best kept laugh
of World War I . . . told
in the British style of
leering befuddlement.
NEXT: "NO PLACE LIKE HOMICIDE"

11

CONCORDIA LUTHERAN:
New Community College Set
To Train Teachers, Ministers

L

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Dial 5-6290
TODAY ONLY

ENDING FRIDA\'
Shows start at 1 :00
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Feature 10 Minutes Later

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FRIENDLY MERCHANTS SHOW

The War Lover Doesn't Love - He Makes Love

RICHARD BOONE
LUANA PATTEN

GEORGE HAMILTON
ARTHUR O'CONNELL

By JOHN BRYANT
Approximately two miles east of
the city, Concordia Lutheran Jun-
ior College is rapidly taking shape.
This two year college, designed
primarily to train teachers, min-
isters, and other personnel for the
Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod,
will begin operations next Sep-
tember, according to the college's
business manager, Louis Garnow.
The first class will contain ap-
proximately 250 students and col-
lege officials foresee a total en-
rollment of 450-500 once the col-
lege gets under way.
Completing Buildings
Concordia is now in the process
of completing its buildings and
assembling a faculty. Paul Zim-
merman has already been named
president of the college.
According to Rev. Alfred Schieps
of the University Lutheran Chap-
el, the instructional and dormitory
buildings were built by the Synod
at a cost of $6 million.
However, the Michigan District
of the Lutheran Church-Missouri
Synod paid for the construction
of the $510,000 chapel. This chapel
is novel in that it is triangular,
symbolizing the Holy Trinity.

College officials expect most stu-
dents to live in the dormitories
on campus. These dormitories will
be divided into small units for 32
students each.
Concordia is one of approxi-
mately 12 Lutheran Church-Mis-
souri Synod junior colleges in the
country. All are aimed at training
students for religious work.

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GREETINGS
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ANN ARBOR
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