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December 11, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-11

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. DEVEMRFR. 11i4ito

PAG_ TO.TE IC IG N AIYTTDA r n 'vwo'

i UA;j "Ax , ilGunivI bEm 11, 1ybz

G

UNIQUE QUALITY:
Considers 'Little Symphony'

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Differing from a chamber or-
chestra, the Chicago Little Sym-
phony is the only one of its kind
in the world, Thor Johnson, its
founder and conductor, said after
a performance in Ann Arbor this
weekend.
The chamber orchestra is of two
varieties, both limiting themselves
to 40 members. There is the small
orchestra with strings and double
winds and the classic orchestra
with strings and no trombones. A
Baroque orchestra, on the other
hand, includes strings and either
two oboes or two horns.
"The little symphony comprises
twenty players, is more aptly de-
scribed as an ensemble of solo
winds and strings," Johnson says.
It contains all the families of
the regular-sized orchestra, but in
moderation; there is one of each
of the winds, sixrviolins, two vio-
Across
Campus
WUOM-FM will broadcast the
speech University President Har-
lan Hatcher gave last Friday on
his recent trip to the Near East
from 6:05-7 p.m. tonight.
Social Work...
Prof. Fred L. Strodebeck of the
University of Chicago will speak on
"Recent Developments in the
Study of Family Interaction" at
4;15 p.m. today in Rm. 2065, Frieze
Bldg. The speech is sponsored by
the social work school and is a
part of the social work-social sci-
ence colloquium.
Naval Aviation...
Rear Admiral William I. Martin
of the United States Navy will
speak to the University's Naval
Reserve Officer Training Corps
midshipmen on naval aviation at
11 a.m. today in Kellogg Aud. Mar-
tin is the Navy's chief of Navy
Air Reserve Training and has un-
der his command all training of
Naval Reserve Aviation activities
includin gthe Naval Air Station at
Grosse Ile.
Conn To Lecture
On Gland Disease
Prof. Jerome W. Conn o the
medical school will present the
Pincoffs "Lecture in Medicine at
the University of Maryland to-
day. The lecture, named in honor
of Dr. Maurice Pincoffs, is entitled
"Primary Aldosteronism," a dis-
ease caused by a tumor in the
adrenal gland. The disease was
discovered by Prof. Conn in 1955.

las, two celli, and one double bass,
harp, timpani and percussion.
Unknown Works
"Two-thirds of our repertoire
is unrecorded and almost un-
known. In fact, most of our play-
ing is from hand-written manu-
script. Our organization has com-
missioned many works, including
'Fantasy, Chorale, and Fugue' by
Wallace Berry, of the music
school, which we performed here
Sunday afternoon," Johnson add-
ed.
The little symphony is purely
a product of the twentieth cen-
tury, growing out of the effects
of World War I when most of the
full-sized orchestras were develop-
ing. Stravinsky, Schoenberg, and
Hindemith were some of the first
composers to write for this me-
dium.
The first little symphony, which
consisted of 14 players,' was or-
ganized by Georges Barrere, a flut-
ist, in the 1920's. Johnson, im-
pressed by this ensemble, formed
his own in 1931 at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina, where he
was teaching. From there he came
to Michigan, where he organized
a little symphony in the fall of
1934. During its seven-year exist-
ence it performed over 500 con-
certs in 28 states.
Third Season
The Chicago ;Little Symphony
is now in its third season. Includ-
ing many musicians from the Chi-

THOR JOHNSON
.. symphony conductor

cago Lyric Opera Orchestra, fac-
ulty members of music schools, and
radio and recording orchestra
members, the orchestra tours for
eight weeks of the year. During
the summer, the symphony per-
forms as the Peninsula Festival
Orchestra in Fish Creek, Wis.
For the greater part of the year,
Johnson is the director of musical
activities at Northwestern Uni-
versity, an occupation independ-
ent of his symphony work.

Sees Strong Competition
In American Business

Cites Nature
Of Present
Democracy
By ROBERT SELWA ,
"Democracy is not an easily
packaged thing you can wrap up
in cellophane and send elsewhere,"
Victor Reuther recently told la-
bor union leaders from the United
States, Bolivia and Indonesia as-
sembled at the Union.
"It has to be indigenous," he
continued. Reuther, longtime la-
bor leader who is administrative
assistant to the president of the
UnitedaAuto Workers, was speak-
ing at the conference on "Our
Changing World."
'The genius of democracy,"
Reuther asserted, "is that it is a
living organism, that it can re-
flect its environment. It forges di-
versity into strength."
Stifle Change
He stressed that democracy is
not a dogma. "Those who seek to
make a dogma of democracy seek
to stifle change-but the world
will change anyway."
Political democracy, he. said,
cannot survive in this industrial
age unless it is invigorated and
bolstered by social and industrial
democracy.
The neutrals of the world, Reu-
ther declared, are not neutral
about freedom and genuine inde-
pendence. He urged the use of
"this power of freedom" for re-
sponsible social and economic
change.
Union Movements
He urged the labor leaders to
seek international labor alliances.
"If the trade union movements
of the different countries of the
world are to effectively deal with
corporations that are no longer
merely national in scope, then you
must associate yourselves with
your colleagues across the world."
Labor's role in meeting the vast
changes that result from the new
technology is to see that these
changes will benefit the people
along constructive democratic
lines, Reuther suggested.
"And there is no group in our
society," he added, "more able to
build industrial and social democ-
racy than trade unions," he said.
"We fought law wages, slums and
bad education and now we are
fighting racial injustice."
Cappaert To Run
For City Council
LeRoy A. Cappaert, Democrat,
yesterday announced his candi-
dacy for the City Council, Cap-
paert, principal of Pattengill Ele-
mentary School, will run in the
fifth ward and will oppose Repub-
lican incumbent Bent F. Neilsen.
Smith To Discuss
Remedial Reading
Prof. Donald Smith of the pub-
lic health school will speak on
"Techniques of Teaching Remedial
Reading" at 7 p.m. tonight in Rm.
3K of the Michigan Union.
The lecture is one of a series in
the Voice tutorial program.

LECTURE SERIES:
Strasberg Views Growth
Of American Theatre

N'

By DEBORAH BEATTIE
"American theatre as we know
it now is as unusual a phenome-
non as the drama of the Elizabeth-
an or Greek periods," Lee Stras-
berg said Sunday.
Speaking on "The American
Theatre Yesterday and Today" as
a part of the Professional Theatre
Program's Distinguished Lecture
Series, Strasberg pointed out that
culturally this is a young country
and that the American theatre is
starting fresh with almost no tra-
dition.
Previously the American theatre
was a mixture of styles coming
from abroad. A real American
theatre did not come into existence
until 1918. Not until the play-
wright brings on the stage a liv-
ing image of his particular coun-
try can that country be said to
have its "own theatre," Strasberg
explained.
Exciting Experience
Strasberg described his seeing
the production, "What Price
Glory" as one of his most exciting
theatrical experiences. "One be-
came aware of a vivid sense of
AHC Scores
Promiscuity
By MARY LOU BUTCHER
Members of Assembly House
Council at a weekly meeting held
yesterday, discussed the methods
which individual residence halls
are considering to handle promis-
cuous behavior in the dormitory
public lounges.
Maxine Loomis, '65N, of Mary
Markley Council cited the resolu-
tion passed last week at that dor-
mitory's council meeting:
1) Markley Council realizes that
it can make no value judgment
of the moral standards of its
residents;
2) The conduct in the public
areas of Markley on the part of a
few has been found offensive by a
majority of the residents as well
as embarrassing to themselves and
their guests;
3) Council must act therefore,
not on a basis of moral standards,
but as the representative of ma-
jority opinion;-,
4) All conduct and display of
emotion in the public areas of
Markley is to be in accord with
those standards of social conduct
considered acceptable by the resi-
dents and visitors to Markley.
Miss Loomis pointed out that
an acceptable method of enforc-
ing the resolution must be worked
out by Markley Council.
Palmer House Council represen-
tative Elaine Smith, '66N, com-
mented that her house is consid-
ering setting aside a specific "date
lounge" where women can spend
time with their guests.
The practice observed in Couz-
ens, when a woman's behavior in
the lounges is deemed unaccept-
able, is a private conference be-
tween the woman and the house
director, Jane Campbell, '63Ed,
said.

language, which was our own lan-
guage, never heard on the stage
before," he said.
"Theatre existing only in the
past becomes a museum or a li-
brary. People seeing a play must
feel that it is intended for them,"
he said.
Strasberg commented that his
generation came into the theatre
"on the wings of a dream." Part of
this dream was a vision from
abroad which tried to define a
new idea of theatre. "Instead of
seeing the theatre as accidentally
collected, for the first time this
vision predicted the unity of the
theatre," he said.
In addition, he cited the contri-
bution of the Theatre Guild, as
group of intellectuals who drew
from world literature to find suc-
cessful works for the stage. This
helped to inspire our own play-
wrights, he pointed out.
Theatrical Oasis
"America became an oasis for
world theatre and out of this came
our own ideas," he said.
Strasberg offered two explana-
tions for the disappearance of the
American theatre in the 1930's-
sound films and the depression.
When sound movies were develop-
ed, actors were needed not just to
be seen, but to talk, and a wealth
of talent was drawn from the
theatre, he explained.
When World War II started, it
marked the end of a great period
of theatre that had lasted for
about 20 years. The playwrights
of this period compared very fa-
vorably with the playwrights of
the Elizabethan times, with the
exception of Shakespeare, he said.
Scores Criticism
Strasberg objected to contem-
porary criticism that scores de-
cadence and immorality as themes
of plays. "This criticism is not
warranted, because it is not the
author who is responsible for these
things, it is us. This unfair criti-
cism makes it difficult for the
dramatist to do what he has to
do, which is to look deeply," he
said.
Now in the 1960's we are in a
new period. Knowing that we will
continue to live in a political
crisis, we desire to go back to the
cultural elements on which we de-
pend for a full life.
There is even more hunger for
the theatre in the small towns,
where the best productions are
seen. Many New Yorkers, as they
are exposed to both the good and
the bad, show less appreciation for
this art form.
Strasberg ended the lecture with
the assertion that "a theatre lives
on an ideal, a dream-right,
wrong or indifferent, it must have
its dream."

TODAY at
FOLLETT'S

q

""

Tomorrow at 8 P.M. at the
HILLEL FOUNDATION

DR. GEORGE E. MENDENHALL
Professor of Near Eastern Studies
speaks on
"THE FORCE OF CONSCIENCE
IN THE FACE OF A HOSTILE SOCIETY"
based on "Jeremiah"
Lecture No. 6 in H I LLEL'S fall series of Wednesdays at 8
on
"Moral Values Reflected in Great Literature"
All are welcome

ROOK and
RECORD SALE

I

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation

1429 Hill St.

DIAL 2-6264

Shows at
1 :20
3:45
6:20
8:55

* ENDING TODAY *
Bette Davis, Joan Crawford
"WHAT EVER HAPPENED
TO BABY JANE"

"There are strong indications
that comparatively small firms are
able to enter, survive and prosper
in the face of competition from
the giants," Prof. Ross J. Wilhelm
of the business school said recent-
ly.
"The record of change and
progress since the end of World
War II raises serious doubts as to
the validity of the charges that
American business is monopoly
ridden and a small fellow, doesn't
stand a chance."
Prof. Wilhelm acknowledged
that it is "very difficult to test
the hypothesis that American in-
dustry is monopoly ridden," but
that revelant evidence is available
for determining "whether or not
little fellows have been able to
enter industry and to survive in
competition with the giants."
Cites Evidence
He cited the following as evi-
dence supporting his belief:
Discount houses, starting out as
small firms, have brought decisive
price reductions, up to 30 per cent
on some items. And, he adds, "The
conventional big stores are being
forced to adjust or die. This ob-
viously is not a monopoly situa-
tion."
More than a dozen foreign car
producers have entered the Amer-
ican automobile industry, forcing
the American firms to adjust to
their competition. "Most of the
foreign car producers were rela-
tively small firms to begin with
and some of them have been able
to grow and prosper despite the
DIAL 5-6290
4 Shows Daily at
1:10-3:40-6:10-8:40
Feature Times below

I

1

DIAL 8-6416
Ends
Saturday
ASTOR
PICTURES
presents
ROGER VADIM'S UNCUT
MASTERPIECE!
A TO R PIT R E SO M N E pP HEI MMU E
JEANEMORAadi 1~RID PIILP
UC W vIAN-A MARG[A 001NOR PR0BVCIlON
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competition of the large Ameri-
can firms."
Gasoline Market
The "off" brands of gasoline
have captured about 25 per cent
of the gasoline market by offer-
Ing the gas at price discounts.
Though the major brands have,
countered, "it is not a certainty
that the off brands will not win
out in the long run."
The entire structure of the goods
industry has been revolutionized
with many small firms growing
into huge organizations because of
the rise of frozen foods and pre-
cooked meals and dishes.
The radio broadcasting industry
has grown and prospered despite
the powerful competition of tele-
vision and the demise of the ra-
dio networks. In radio only the
individual station catering to local
needs has been able to find a place
in the market.
"I think it is a fair statement
that almost every American indus-
try has been subjected to powerful
competition since the end ofbWorld
War II despite the overpublicized
findings of a comparatively few
anti-trust cases," he said.
Kimball Says
McCarran Act
Curtails Rights
(Continued from Page 1)
"The real way to oppose Com-
munim is in a free market of
ideas."
Prof. Kimball also noted that
when former President Harry S.
Truman vetoed the bill he did it
mainly on grounds other than the
supression of free speech and as-
sembly. Truman felt that the act
did not strengthen the internal
security of the country, with which
he was vitally concerned, and
would even weaken it.
Although the ACLU does not ob-
ject to the act primarily on these
grounds, it is another aspect to
keep in mind when looking at the
act's desirability, Prof. Kimball
said.
Truman, in his veto message to
Congress in 1950, wrote ;"it has
been claimed over and over that
this is an 'anti-communist' bill-
a 'Communist control' bill. But in
actual operation the bill would
have results exactly the opposite
of those intended. . . . It would
help the Communists in their ef-
forts to create dissension and con-
fusion within our borders."
Truman later in the message
referred to the specific provisions
now pertinent to the Communist
Party trial and claimed, "the idea
of requiring Communist organiza-
tions to divulge information about
themselves is a simple and attrac-
tive one. But it is about as prac-
tical as requiring thieves to regis-
ter with the sheriff. Obviously, no
such organization as the Commun-
ist Party.is likely to register
voluntarily."

* STARTS
AT LASTI
A MOTION
PICTURE
THAT
DELIVERS...
;' BE

WEDNESDAY
iELVILLE SHAVELSON'S
Ottg~

This pigeon came to make war This wolf said: "No more
-and she threw in the towel! love in a pigeon coop!"W
IIA\RY G[IARIO "B QMNI " GABRIE MOMP1BRIAN ~ DOND " M. ARMOll
Shows at 1:10-3:05-5:00-7:00 and 9:00
Feature at 1:20-3:15-5:10-7:10 and 9:15

-L. ..

Frank
Sinatra
:f Laurence
Harvey
Janet
Leigh
S
Mac prian
Candidate
Because it
is so vital
that you see
it from the
beginning,
check these
starting times
very carefully!
Feature
goes
on at:
1:30 P.M.
4:00 P.M.
6:30 'P.M.
9:00 P.M.

0-
Off Broadway's
Longest Running Hit Musical !
- Amag - f- A 2

... campus humor magazine
ON SALE WEDNESDAY

G

RGOYLE

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Cartoonist:

Charles Schulz-author of Peanuts
-Costs a measly 25 cents

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