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December 01, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-01

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t, DECEMBER 1, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

! 1

PAGE THREE

2

India Offers New Plan
For Voluntary System
Of On-Site Inspections

Strauss Leaves Post;
Study New Coalition
BONN ('P)-West German Defense Minister Franz Josef Strauss
announced yesterday he is leaving the cabinet, arousing hopes that
the Spiegel crisis is ending and that a new coalition government can
be formed.
West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer is attempting to
patch up the old coalition of his Christian Democrats, who lack a
Bundestag (parliament) majority, and the conservative Free Demo-
ocratic Party. The latter precipi-t

UNANIMOUSLY:
Thant Chosen To Direct UN

UNITED NATIONS (AP) - The
United Nations General Assembly
yesterday unanimously elected U
Thant as secretary-general for an
additional four years.
Delegates in the 110-nation As-
sembly cast secret ballots ratify-
ing an earlier unanimous recom-
mendation by the Security Council
that Thant's term be extended un-
til Nov. 3, 1966, and the word "act-
ing" dropped from his title.
The secretary-general expressed

hope that he would be able to
"play a role, however humble, in
the easing of tensions and bridging
the gulf between the major pow-
ers."
He stressed his concern for re-
solving the UN's precarious finan-
cial situation and bringing an end
to the Congo crisis.
Soviet delegate Valerian A. Zor-
in reiterated formal support for
the idea of a three-man executive

HOUSING ORDER:
Government Sets Up
Enforcing Procedures
WASHINGTON (RP)-Soft words backed up by tough action was
the pattern laid down yesterday for enforcement of President John
F. Kennedy's order banning discrimination in federally financed
housing.
The Federal Housing and Veterans Administrations, which insure
construction loans on some 15 to 20 per cent of private homes, made
public their regulations to implement the order for new homes. Regu-
lations of both agencies are similar, and a key provision said that

Calls Action
Insufficient
The "strict probation" put on
Mississippi's state colleges and uni-
versities by the Southern Associa-
tion of Colleges and Schools has
been called too weak by Prof. Al-
go D. Henderson of the education
school and director of the Center
for the Study of Higher Education.
Prof. Henderson said that he felt
"the action should have been much
stronger"; he could not imagine
a "more flagrant case of political
control."
"I think the association should
have removed their accreditation,
and only when state officials guar-
antee that there will be freedom
from political control, should it be
given back to them," he said.
Prof. Henderson said that "pro-
bation" was actually too strong a
term for the association's action.
"It's hardly probation, since all
it did was issue a warning."
The action was, in effect, a
blunt "hands off" warning to the
state legislature, politicians and
pressure groups such as the White
Citizens' Councils.

conferences for discussing a viola-
tion will be conducted informally
and "will have as a primary ob-
jective elimination of the discrim-
inatory practice."
Strenuous Efforts
Both FHA Commissioner Nearl
Hardy and VA Benefits Director
Philip N. Brownstein said that
strenuous efforts would be made
to talk the lender or builder into
selling to any person regardless
of race.
If this fails sanctions would be
applied. The provision on possible
sanctions reads that in the case
of discrimination involving lending
practices, the sanction may include
withdrawal of the lender's approv-
al as a mortgagee. In other cases,
the sanction may place the offend-
er's name on the ineligible list.
Reinstatement is under the dis-
cretion of the top official in each
agency and "under such condi-
tions as he may prescribe."
Must Be Worthy
Hardy said a penalized builder
or lender could win reinstatement;
by taking positive action that
proves that he is worthy of rein-
statement.
Omitted from Kennedy's order
last week was conventionally fi-
nanced housing. Some civil rights
advocates have protested that the
order should have been broadened
to include this.

U..,Britain
Said To Gain
ByProposal
C ommiiissioni Would
Investigate Tremors
GENEVA (A')-India took a cau- !
tious step toward the West yes-
terday by calling for a voluntary
system of on-site inspections to
police a ban on nuclear weapons
tests.
The Indian proposal was placed
before the 17-nation disarmament
conference by Indian Ambassador
Arthur H. Lall.
It was largely based- on good
faith and fell short of the iron-
clad legal safeguards demanded by
the United States and Britain to
prevent cheating on a test ban.
Despite this, diplomatic sources
said that Indian recognition that
some international check of suspi-
cious underground disturbances is
indispensible represented a gain
for the two Western powers.
Latest Attempt
The Indian plan was the latest
attempt by non-atomic countries
to break the American-British-
Russian deadlock on the test ban
issue. The proposal drew only cau-
tious reaction from these nations,
mowever.
Lall suggested an international
commission of scientists to keep
track of suspicious earth tremors.
A certain quota of these mysteri-
ous shocks would be investigated in
the area where they occurred.
This could be done, however,
only if the country suspected of
secret tests agreed to invite in-
ternational inspection teams to its
soil.
Treaty Breakdown
Failure to issue such an invita-
tion would cause a breakdown of
the treaty with the blame resting
on the suspected country.
The Indian step camne after Swe-
den, another nonaligned country,
called for an immediate test ban.
The Swedish plan would allow for
an unpoliced moratorium on un-
derground tests until an interim
scientific body worked out an an-
swer to this difficult detection
problem.
I -

tated the crisis Nov. 15 to force
Strauss' ouster because of his
much criticized part in the action
against the weekly magazine Der
Spiegel.
Critics charged Strauss was
sekeing revenge against the maga-
zine, which unrelentingly sought
his downfall. The publisher and
several editors of the magazine
were detained on the grounds that
an article claiming the 400,000-
man armed force that Strauss built
up in his six years in office as un-'
able to stop Soviet aggression was.
treasonable.
Strauss, once considered a like-
ly future chancellor, gave in after
a four-hour meeting in Munich
of the Christian Democrats' Ba-
varian wing, which he heads. His
political future now is in question.
Both coalition parties greeted
Strauss' decision with relief and
optimism, since it removed one
obstacle to their resuming the gov-
ernment with a reshuffled cabinet.
The optimism was guarded, be-
cause of the many clashes within
the coalition during its one-year
history. The two parties get down
to business in new coalition nego-
tiations Monday.
Adenauer seems sure to remain;
as chancellor. His Christian Dem-
ocrats are insisting on this, but
with the provision that he step
down no later than next summer.
Economics MinisterLudwig Er-
hard, favorite to take over even-
tually from Adenauer, and Foreign
Minister Gerhard Schroeder are
considered safe in the coming
shakeup. Casualties are expected
to be the lesser known among the
Christian Democrats' 15 ministers
and the Free Democrats' five.
Experts See
State Surplus
By The Associated Press
LANSING-State fiscal experts
predict a treasury surplus of $25-
30 million for the present fiscal
year, ending June 30, 1963.
The surplus seems certain unless
the state's economy suffers a sud-
den drop early in 1963, State Rev-
enue Commissioner Clarence W.
Lock and State Treasurer Sanford
A. Brown indicated.
Rising sales tax collections and
revenue from the nuisance taxes
enacted last winter account for the
better financial picture.

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Rhode Island has finally picked the winner of
its recent gubernatorial race. Absentee ballots spelled out victory for
Republican John H. Chaffee over Democratic Gov. John A. Notte, Jr.
The final unofficial margin: 398 votes.
* * * *
UNITED NATIONS-The Wenner-Gren Foundation of Sweden
is planning to donate $1 million to the United Nations for the con-

representing the Communist, neu-
tral and Western nations.
But Zorin added that in view of
the realities of the situation the
Soviet Union was voting for Thant
as a fine candidate for the post.
He added that the Soviet Union
recognized the need for resolving
the leadership problem by "tak-
ing into account the qualities of
Thant." He singled out specifical-
ly Thant's role in the Cuban crisis.
Boosts in pay and allowances for
Thant were recommended by the
UN Budgetary Committee, and are
virtually certain to be approved by
the Assembly.'
United States Ambassador Ad-
lai E. Stevenson lauded Thant as
a man devoted to "the cause of
peace and understanding among
all peoples."
He made no direct reference to
the Troika proposal pushed by
the Russians, but asserted the
Assembly by its action had reaf-
firmed "the integrity of the office
of secretary-general."

FRANZ JOSEF STRAUSS
... plans to resign
'ANALOGY':
Tell Virginia
To Redistrict
ALEXA~NDRIA - Both houses of
Virginia's legislature must reap-
portion by Jan. 31, a three-judge
federal court decided yesterday in,
a split decision.
The majority opinion signifi-
cantly rejected the so-called "fed-
eral analogy," which argues that
because of the geographically-bas-
ed United States Senate, states
may ignore population in district-
ing for one house.
Copyright 1962, The New York Times

struction of a new building for the
UN International School, to be lo-
cated in Yorksville, N.Y.
JERUSALEM - Israel will not
remain neutral if Egyptian inter-
vention in Yemen spreads to oth-
er areas of the Mideast, Israeli
Premier David Ben-Gurion said
yesterday.
NASHVILLE'-James R. Hoff a's
attorneys accused the federal gov-
ernment yesterday of holding back
its case against the Teamsters
Union president until it felt the
time was ripe for a conviction on
a $1 million conspiracy charge.
* * *
NEW YORK -- The Dow-Jones
Industrial averages showed indus-
trials down 3.31; railroads up .75;
utilities down .86; and 65 stocks
down .73.

EU

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Come

One,

Come All!

TO
HillSupper Club
Sunday at 6:00 P.M.

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KOSHER DELICATESSEN
Members 75c
Non-Members $1.00
1429 H ill Street

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Gambia Debates Plans
For Future Freedom

By MALINDA BERRY ,
Even the smallest and poorest
of African colonies is a potential
factor in power politics.
Gambia, a Connecticut-sized
British colony on the West Afri-
can coast, is causing some contro-
versy about its future plans-eith-
er independence, union with an-
other country, or semi-independ-
ence with British support.
Neighboring Senegal would like
Gambia to be joined with it. The
British colony pokes into Senegal
like a long finger, and geography
suggests that such a union would
be practical. Gambia is no more
than two strips of land which are
cut by a river which originates
in Senegal.
"Senegal can't afford to let
Gambia fall into the hands of
either Ghana or Guinea," Prof.
Henry L. Bretton of the political
science department commented.
A Dagger
A Gambian union with any oth-
er "social revolutionary group
which would try to transform it
into a dagger thrust into the
midst of Senegal" would be equal-
ly disastrous to Senegal, Prof.
Bretton noted.
Since Gambia is one of the
weakest colonies on the continent,
it is unlikely that it could support
absolute independence, he contin-
ued.
It is quite possible that union
with Senegal is realizable if the
ethnic question could be resolved,
Prof. Bretton said.;
Close to France
Senegal is French-speaking, and
its administrative system and cur-
rency are quite different from
Gambia's. Senegal, though inde-
pendent, keeps very close to metro-
politan France, if for no other
reason than to insure continued
economic assistance.
On the other hand, political
leaders in Gambia, where the of-
ficial language is English, are close
to Britain, relying on it to prop,
up the country's shaky economy.
The only alternative to union
with Senegal would be a program
of determined support by either
Great Britain or the West, Prof.
Bretton commented. He feels "it
is likely that Great Britain could
establish an economic interest."
No Hurry
Gambian leaders do not seem
in a hurry for full independence.
They advocate two to three years
of their present internal self-gov-
trmnt_+ hrf ro arn to + t+e

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPALL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
1 1 :00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.-and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8:CJ. Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate
SATURDAY
12:15-Graduate Student Luncheon. The
Reverend Walter Kloetzli, of the Urban
Planning of National Lutheran Council,
speaker.
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship Service. Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Worship Service. The Rev. Walter.
Kloetzli, guest preacher
7:00 p.m.kStudent Meeting-Mr. Kloetzli
speaker on "You and the Urban
Challenge"
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 5
7:15 Vesper Devotions.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
9:30 and 11 a.m. "Who Is This Jesus?" Dr.
Fred E. Luchs.
10:20-10:40 a.m. Bible Lecture by Mrs. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL: 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.;
Crib-9th grade.
STUDENT GUILD, 802 Monroe, Sunday Eve-
ning at 8:30.

PROF. HENRY L. BRETTON
... Gambia's growing pains
Commonwealth. Neither wants to
see Gambia swallowed up by Sene-
gal, but they are unclear as to
how this can be avoided.
Continued Aid
Both hope that somehow British
aid will be continued even after
independence, whatever arrange-
ments are eventually made with
Senegal.
But there seems a reluctance
on Britain's part to provide fin-
ancing for development projects,
including two that could be absorb-
ed by Senegal when the colony.
gets independence.

B AT Hl

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus, Ministers.
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Mornirig Worship,
The Advent Cospel, "The Good News of
Love." Sermon by Dr. Rupert. This service is
broadcast over WOIA (1290 a.m., 102.9
F.M.) 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar, "The Religions of
China." Pine Room.
7:00-Worship and Program, Wesley Lounge.
Dr. kosella Duerksen, on "What Might
the New Methodist Hymnal Be."
MONDAY
8:00 to 11:00 p.m.-Open House, Jean
Robe's apartment.
TUESDAY
12:00 Noon-Student Cabinet Luncheon, Pine
Room.
5:15 p.m.-Church Related Vocations, Pine
Room.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
4:00 p.m.-Wesley Fellowship will be guests
of the W.S.C.S. at their Christmas Tea in
the Wesley Lounge.
5:15 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6-8 p.m.-Grad Supper, Pine Room
THURSDAY
7:30 p.m.-Kappa Phi Cabinet, Wesley
Lounge.
FRIDAY
12:00 Noon - Wesley Foundation Board
luncheon meeting in the Pine Room.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Saturday at 1:00 P.M.: Decorate the chapel
and center.
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
with sermon by the Pastor, "Remembering
God's Countdown."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible study groups
Sunday at 5:00: Gamma Delta hosts visiting
Gamma Delta chapters for supper and
vesper service after the MESSIAH concert.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M. and 10:00 P.M.:
Midweek Advent Vespers, Sermon by the
pastor, "Isaiah: Evangelist of Hope."
(Holy Communion)
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenaw at Forest
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
John G. Malcin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study

For transportation to any service

call 2-2756

........ . .
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resh from Lake Michigan ...

I

ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Ray and Nancy McNair, House Directors
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Adult Discussion, Sunday School.
11 :00 a.m.Meeting for Worship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO2 -3580

I

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THE SALVATION ARMY
Religious services every Sunday
220 E. Washington
Sunday School-10:00 a.m.
Holiness Service--i 1:00 a.m.
Evangelistic Service-7:15 p.m.
Everyone is Welcome
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
519 mn 509 EHuron

(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
9:30 Guild House at 802 Monroe

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