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December 01, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1962

TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1,1962

IN ANN ARBOR:
Ask Civil Defense Speed-Up

Economist Tells Criteria
For Indian Investment

(Continued from Page 1)
Washtenaw County qualifies for
of shielding from radiation. Ac- funds for shelter equipment.
cording tor the Washtenaw County Miller said that the county of-
office of civil defense, "studies fice encourages the building of
. .indicate that shelter space private shelters by issuing pam-
meeting this lower standard would phlets written by the federal civil
save lives in large areas of the defense office.
country not exposed to the most 6) The defense department "has
intense radiation. authorized the use of stand-by
) 2 "About 10,000 box cars of military reservists on a voluntary
shelter supplies can be installed basis for civil defense service at
over the next six months with the request of civil defense author-
adequate local cooperation." The ities."
county will probably receive such Refuse Request
supplies. Locally, the Ann Arbor Board of
Rural Areas Education turned down a request
3) "The base has been laid for on Thursday from the Ann Arbor
an intensified effort to provide office of civil defense to allow
technical civil defense help in licensing of spaces as fallout shel
rural areas, particularly on in- ters in six public schools and the
expensive shelters for people, and Ann Arbor Public Library.
on methods for protecting live- One reason the request was
stock and crops against fallout." refused is because the board said
4 Thefndra iildfenselof-.the shelters did not provide ade-
4) The federal civil defense of- quate protection and therefore
fice is establishing workshops would give a false sense of secur-
throughout the country to trainw iy.I addlsin eobudn
architects, engineers and con- ity. In addition, the buildings
tractors in the "technique of lo- would have been open to the
eating shielding in buildings and public.
in improvising shelters." The city's policy, according to
inthrespengtsh tr ningRobert Shipman, director of the
With respect to such training, Ann Arbor office of civil defense,
the architecture and design col- is to "utilize the capabilities it
lege offers a course in analyzing now has by using buildings that
the structure of defense shelters. have basements."
Matching Funds Official List
5) The civil defense office has Shipman said an official list of
authorized the expenditure of buildings that would be used in
matching funds for purchase of time of disaster would be made
supplies and equipment for local public soon. He added that the
centers. According to Miller University has "buildings and tun-
nels" that would provide for "more
people than the total student
body."
Shipman estimated that within
two or three months, enough
buildings would be available for
Dial 8-6416 civil defense purposes to offer
protection to everyone in Ann
Continuous Today Arbor.
The new city hall, still under
From 1 A.M. construction, will offer shelter to
all its city employees, but not to
.IRuII x u the general public. According to
VNIKI1 Shipman, the basement will have
a protection factor of 1000, which
BA N N E D that "a person would be
IN ITS COUNTRY 1000 times as safe in the building
OF ORIGIN as out on a hill."
Protection Factor
"THIS Is Ostafin said that the Univer-
"HS sity had shelter facilities that have
UNQUESTIONABLY a protection factor of 100.
According to Shipman, the city's
A GREAT PICTURE civil defense program costs the
Ann Arbor resident about $13,000
a year. This money is used for
"A REMARKABLE
P'ECE OF MOVIE "THE PERFECT GIFT
MAKING" FOR EVERYONE"
Herald Tribune
... Makes the orgy in
'La Dolce Vita'
look like a family picnic"
-N.Y.Daly News
Grand Prix Winner 0
1961 Cannes Festival0
LUIS BUNUEL'Sd
LVIRIDIANA from IE~
MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE
322 South State Street
Coming NO 3-3371
"LES LIASONS OPEN SATURDAY
DANGEREUX' AFTERNOONS
UNTIL CHRISTMAS
-

paying the salaries of Shipman
and his secretary and radiation
measurement equipment.1
Although Ann Arbor has had a1
civil defense program since the
1930's for protection against fires
and tornadoes, the office of civil1
defense director was not created
by the city until 1958.
Write Document
The director is responsible for
the writing of "The Operational1
Survival Plan for Ann Arbor," a
234-page document, outlining the
facilities and personnel availableE
to the civil defense office and their
functions in the event of an
emergency.t
The plan is put into effect upon
the declaration of emergency by
the governor. The Ann Arbor po-
lice receive warning of an attack.
from the Washtenaw County sher-;
iff. All city government depart-;
ments, boards, commissions and
institutions are then pressed into
civil defense service.
The communications officer, a
representative of a telephone com-
pany, is responsible for maintain-,
ing communications between the
city and the state control center.
According to a summary of the
plan, "a pool of radio facilities
and circuits is made up to the
maximum extent possible from
existing radio services."
Record Information
The policy department is re-
sponsible for receiving, recording
and evaluating information re-
ceived from all sources and for
providing information for the civil
defense director so he will be able
to make decisions.
The police would also have the
job of regulating traffic along es-
tablished routes, preventing sabo-
tage and subversive activities and
providing "light rescue operations
and radiological monitoring."
According to a summary of the
plan, "an auxiliary police squad
is now being trained to supple-
ment our existing police fore"
The job of giving medical aid
and supplementing it' with such
essentials as clothing, food and
housing would be given to the
Washtenaw County welfare, health
and medical departments in case
of an enemy attack or natural
disaster.
Explains Tra
By Students I
By BARBARA LAZARUS
"An undergraduate preparing for
law school must read materials for
his courses in a critical way rath-
er than just assimilating and be-
ing spoon-fed facts," Prof. Stew-
art Law of the George Washington
University Law School said Wed-
nesday.
Speaking on "Training for Law"
as a part of an information pro-
gram for pre-legal students, Prof.
Law added that the ability to par-
Con ferences
To Consider
f Y as a w *Lb

By THOMAS DRAPER
Criteria for investment in the
Indian economy were discussed by
Prof. Arnold C. Harberger of the
University of Chicago Thursday
at a meeting of the University
Economics Society.
Prof. Harberger, back from a
year in India, said that it is neces-
sary to establish criteria because
one half of the investment is in
the public sector of the newly
developing Indian economy.
The total productivity and ben-
efit of a public project should be
used as criteria for investment,
rather than the private return on
capital, Prof. Harberger explained.
Dual Role
The productivity of capital has
a dual role for investment deci-
sion, Prof. Harberger said. It is
a measure of the contribution of
additional investment to economic
growth, and it is a criterion for
project evaluation.
"The current rate of productiv-
ity demanded of power and ir-
rigation projects is in the order
of three-five per cent per year.
If this is an accurate measure of
the social productivity of capital
then capital must be a negligible
factor in economic growth," Prof.
Harberger said.
The typical quality of the un-
skilled labor in India would imply
a low productivity of labor, he
said. If the productivity of labor
was assumed to be zero, the pro-
ductivity of capital would be in
the neighborhood of 30 per cent
per year.
Analysis Assumption
In his analysis, he assumed that
the productivity of labor is re-
flected by wages. Then the produc-
tivity of capital ranged from 10-17
per cent.
He said that the immobility of
labor is a major problem of the
Indian economy.
"A farmer who does not own
his land makes around 200 to 300
rupees. A rickshaw driver (an
occupation requiring a minimum
of skill) in the city receives 500
to 600 rupees."
Suspicion
Prof. Harberger said that there
was a tremendous suspicion on
the part of Indian intellectuals
towards the price mechanism. He
ning Needed
Entering Law

cited historical and intellectual
grounds for this view.
"For a hundred years prior to
independence the Indian economy
had a freely operating price mech-
anism. During this time it did not
achieve a substantial increase in
the per capita income.
"Indian intellectuals were train-
ed at a certain time and at a
certain place. Although Fabian
economics lost acceptance in Eng-
land during the 40's, it has deep
roots in India."
He said that many actions taken
by India start to make sense when
viewed with respect to mild-
socialism economics. He said that
one specific result of this philos-
ophy is the general belief that
profits are immoral.
Bullard Notes
Middle East
Vulnerability
"Today in the Middle East there
are many small states, each hav-
ing its own hopes and fears and
capable of being easily hurt," Sir
Reader Bullard, former member of
the British Foreign Service and
former director of Commonwealth
Studies at Oxford University, said
Thursday.
Speaking on "The Middle East
and West Since 1945," Bullard not-
ed that among the most important
problems of the Middle East to-
day are those of foreign affairs
and economics.
"Some states are extremely poor,
while others have great wealth
from resources such as oil," Bul-
lard said.
Provincial Proficiency
He maintained that democratic
government in the Middle East
may be far in the future, but young
people can practice government
operation at a provincial level. In
local government they can attain
proficiency in practical affairs and
not depend on mere oratory.
"The formation of voluntary so-
cieties, offering information on
various aspects of national gov-
ernment and accomplishing some
needs of society which government
cannot meet, is another means of
practicing for democratic govern-
ment," Bullard went on.
It is a mistake to think that if a
country draws up a framework for
democratic government, it will nec-
essarily be established, he said. An
attitude for democracy is also
needed; and of all Middle Eastern
governments, only Turkey has
made a serious attempt to estab-
lish something like democracy,
Bullard explained.
Speaking on the 1955 Suez
crisis, Bullard said that the refusa
of the United States and Great
Britain to help Egypt build the
Aswan Dam infuriated Premier
Gamal Abdul Nasser.
Even if the British had reached
some settlement, it could have
been repudiated by Egypt as sign-
ed under duress, he added.
Toward Democracy
"The Persian government has
not advanced far towards attain-
ing a democracy. But one law, now
in the process of being put into ef-
fect by the agriculture minister, is
a step in the direction of democ-
racy," he noted.
It requires the breaking up o
large estates and will help narrow
the gap between rich and poor
Bullard explained. "Such progres
in a country which has been so
slow in developing is very impor
tant."

Views Need.
To Examine
Moral Ideas
BY DIANE GAC
"It is both necessary and desir-
able that higher education be con-
cerned with searching out and ex-
amining moral issues," Prof. Wil-
liam W. Jellema of the education
school said Wednesday in one of
a series of lectures sponsored by
the Office of Religious Affairs. '
Prof. Jellema defined a moral
issue as a choice between two or
more alternatives which demands
personal decision that cannot be
based on facts alone and which
has future consequences for one-
self or for other men.
"The ability to perceive moral
issues and to make decisions about
them is essential to man's human-
ity," he said. "Education ought to
be concerned with making a man
a full man.",
Not Fully Human
Education that does not teach
morals can produce an intelligent
being who is something less than
fully human, he added.
There are other reasons for the
need of a moral education. Prof.
Jellema pointed out that intensive
study and research in any seem-
ingly non-moral field create and
re-discover moral issues.
For instance, through scientific
research, nuclear weapons have
been evolved, and the moral issue
of war is not only revived but
magnified in scope and conse-
quences, he said.
Decision Incapability
Never has moral decision been
so important as in our technical
age, yet never has man seemed
to be so incapable of making de-
cisions, according to Prof. Jelle-
ma. Technology has weakened tra-
ditional morality by bringing man
closer to the difference in moral
codes in other parts of the world,
he explained.
Rapidtechnical advance has
exaggerated in the modern gen-
eration an already impoverished
sense of history, Prof. Jellema
maintained. To the adolescent, the
way of life and the moral princi-
ples of the past generation are ob-
solescent; to him the parental
model is not so much wrong as
irrelevant.
Prof. Jellema expressed impa-
tience with the type of academic
objectivitiy which is sterile and
static, saying that the men of the
academic world should show them-
selves to be men of conviction.
Group To Host
Detroit Church
The Protestant Foundation for
International Students will host 50
members of a Detroit Negro church
t in Ann Arbor today.
The visitors, who will be guests
of local church members, have
been invited as a reciprocal ges-
ture stemming from the Detroit
Negro church's invitations to Uni-
versity international students in
the past few years.
Kloetzli To Speak
On Urban Matters
The Lutheran Student Center
and Chapel will present a series of
lectures by the. Rev. Dr. Walter
f Kloetzli, secretary of urban church
v planning for the National Luther-
, an Council. He will speak on "Urb-
s an Renewal" at 12:15 p.m. today
and on "You and the Urban Chal-
lenge" at 7 p.m. tomorrow in the
chapel.

CHEMISTRY:
Pharmacy College
Initiates Program

By PHILIP SUTIN
The pharmacy college this year,
inaugurated a program leading to
a bachelor of science degree in
medicinal chemistry.
The new program differs from
the standard pharmacy program
in that it requires four years of
study instead of the standard five

and that it substitutes more the-
oretical chemistry and physics
courses for practical pharmacy
courses, Dean Tom D. Rowe of the
pharmacy college explained.
The program substitutes a year
of mathematics, physical chemis-
try and a language as well as a
course in organic qualitative chem-
ical analysis for some pharmacy
requirements and drops such
practical courses as pharmaceuti-
cal management, he said.
Not Qualifying
Dean Rowe noted that this pro-
gram does not qualify students to
take the state pharmaceutical ex-
aminations necessary to become a
registered pharmacist.
Noting that this is the only such
program in the country, Dean
Rowe declared that it "should
strengthen the position of the col-
lege in the area of medicinal chem-
istry."
He said this study is concerned
with the relationship and inter-
action between drugs and human
chemical and biological mechan-
isms.
Other Aims
It also attempts to correlate the
relationship between chemical
structure and biological activity
and the physical properties of
drugs, he explained.

TOM ROWE
... new program

l

SEXY?
(No-just funny)
TRUMAN CAPOTE'S COMEDY HIT
THE GRASS HARP
presented by
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
Dec. 6, 7, 8 - Trueblood Theatre - 8:00 p.m.

Box office (NO 3-6470)
opens Monday

Thurs. $1.50
Fri.-Sat. $1.75

DIAL 2-6264

ENDS

TODAY

Feature starts: at
1:00-3:00-5:05
7:10 and 9:25

The personal story behind that survey...
from the controversial best-selling novel.

SNM NI KOS AMU U ERR BRBMIt MIRE MOM GOOK

TECHNICOLOR'

.

UMMULUSM
The state Council for Social
Studies, the Bureau of School
Services and Extension Service are
sponsoring a conference today,
called "Teaching About Commu-
nism."
The conferees will register at
8:45 a.m. today, adjourn at 11:45,
meet again at 2 p.m., and adjourn
at 3:45.
The four simultaneous confer-
ences, meeting on the fourth floor
of the Rackham Bldg., are "The
Geography and People of the So-
viet Union," by Prof. George Kish
of the geography department;
"The Economics of Communism,"
by Prof. Alexander Eckstein of the
economics department; "The Ide-
ology of Communism," by Prof.
Frank Grace of the political sci-
ence department; and "The Gov-
ernment of the Soviet Union," by
Prof. William B. Ballis, director of
the Russian studies center.
At a Michigan League noon
luncheon, Senators Stanley G.
Thayer (R-Ann Arbor) and Thom-
as F. Schweigert (R-Petoskey) and
members of the state department
of public instruction will discuss
the teaching of Communism.

ticipate back and forth with your
courses is an essential one for fu-
ture lawyers.
Recommending that students
take any courses which will help
them write clearly and simply,
Prof. Law said that "the Perry
Masons you will meet are very few,
and far more of your legal work
will involve well organized writ-
ing which allows people to under-
stand what you are trying to say."
Forensic Ability
Speaking ability, however, is
still important and students should
take courses in college which al-
low them a chance to express
themselves before their fellow stu-
dents. "Any chance on campus to
get involved in forensic activity
will aid future lawyers in learning
to express a point to an audience,"
he added.
Courses in such fields as his-
tory, economics or political sci-
ence offer a good basic background
for lawyers.
"Usually most people at the top
top of the field have good
backgrounds 'in other things than
just law. You should pursue other
interests in various departments
and not merely treat them as ob-
stacles to a degree," Prof. Law
said.
Accounting
Accounting is a necessary part
of a pre-legal student's back-
ground, since often lawyers are
called upon to analyze figures
from an accountant's point of
view, he added.
Speaking on what law schools
demand of students, Prof. Law said
that "law schools will demand ar
innate intellectual ability. Law is
a relatively intellectual field, and
in practice you will meet some 01
the finest minds in your life."
Law school will also demand the
ability to work at a-harder pace
than in undergraduate years. I1
will require a student to have or-
ganizational ability, seriousness o:
purpose and self - discipline, he
said.

%mop"w4moop,

T
S
f
s
i
s
f
e
e
f
e

No one under 16 will be admitted- unless accompanied by an adult.
..

t

Complete Script of
BARTHOLOMEW
FAIR
in
GENERATION
ON SALE IN THE LOBBY
DURING PERFORMANCE

.--,..

DOORS 11% 1 1t11I I1tI t t1
OPEN
12:45 - \ n\n1 n~it il 'aI iD
4 Shows Daily at
1:20-3:45-6:20 and 8:55 - Feature

as
BARTHOLOMEW FAIR
TONIGHT: SOLD OUT
(Only a Few Seats Available for
this Afternoon at 2:30)
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
S. G. C
e e
TONIGHT and Sunday at 7 and 9
EARLY COMEDY AND DRAMA
Settled at the Seaside,
The Lion and the Souse, Friends,

I

Gin erna qui/4 Prmie&'
Cinema Guild announces at this time some
of the outstanding films scheduled for
showing next semester.
VERIDIANA by LUIS BRUNUEL
I'M ALL RIGHT JACK
ON THE WATERFRONT
STALAG 17
THE CAINE MUTINY
THE LAW IS THE LAW
FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
GRAND ILLUSION
GUN FIGHT AT OK CORRAL

START ING
SUNDAY
10 Mins. Later

liONMME as the picture to inaugurate the
HOLLYWOOD neview ENGA MeNT
Bette Davisand Joan Crawford

ENDING
TODAY

MICHIGIN

DIAL
5-629

0

Shows Today at
1, 3, 5, 7:05, 9:10
A STORY OF
CHRISTIANITY

JOSEPH E. LEVINE presents
CORNELWILDE
ELINDA LEE
ON StANTINE
. THEROSS

1

Elm.

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