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November 16, 1962 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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BUSINESS OUTLOOK:
View Problems of Economy

Dyck Outlines Paradoxes
Of Goethe's Philosophy

"The prospects for a vigorous
renewal of the business expansion
in the near future do not appear
bright," Geoffrey H. Moore of the
National Bureau of Economic Re-
search, told a group of the nation's
top economists assembled here
yesterday for the 10th Annual
Conference ori the Economic Out-
look.
"However this does not justify
a recession - around - the - corner
view," he said. He warned that
since last spring a number of lead-
ing indicators have moved in a
downward direction. "There have
been recent signs that this decline
is coming to a halt but other fac-
tors that often spark an advance
or decline have been moving side-
ways rather than sharply up or
down," he said.
Douglas Greenwald of the Mc-
Graw-Hill department cf econom-
ic services, addressing the confer-
ence said capital formation will
decline three per cent in the
United States next year.
Capital Formation Breakdown
Capital formation, he explained,
includes business investment in
new plants and equipment, busi-
ness inventory change, residential
construction and a "catch-all"
group which includes investment
by farmers, professional people,
and private, non-profit institu-
tions in buildings and investments.

There will be a slight increase,
from $37.2 billion to $38.2 billion,
in plant equipment investment, a
modest gain in residential hous-
ing and a leveling off in the catch-
all group, he said.
Despite the fact that 1962 prom-
ised to be the best profits year on
our corporate record books,"
Greenwald noted "disappointing
profits and profit margins" for
planned investment.
Older Machinery
Referring to a McGraw-Hill
survey, Greenwald said "about 40
per cent of our industrial capacity
is now more than 11 years old.
By contrast, overseas facilities of
American corporations are con-
siderably more modern with only
one fourth of their capacity of
that age.
Moore felt that "conceivably a
corner is at hand but at present
this seems to be merely a concep-
tual possibility, awaiting confirma-
tion that may or may not mater-
ialize."
Misleading Interpretation
Business cycle indicators can be
misleading or misinterpreted, he
warned. "Even a confirmed indi-
cator enthusiast like myself will
confess that they tell us far more
about the past than they do about
the present or future."

Moore declared that "the busi-
ness cycle expansion that began
in February, 1961, "has exhibited
some typical characteristics of
previous expansions, and some dif-
ferences."
The conference, a two-day event,
is sponsored by the department of
economics in cooperation with the
Extension Service. It has attracted
about 100 economists to the Uni-
versity from all over the United
States.
The pressure of international
competition and rising costs at
home will result in a greater em-
phasis on modernization, he pre-
dicted.
Offer Tickets
For 'Carmen'
Mail order tickets are now being
taken for the University Players
production of "Carmen" by Bizet.
The opera will be presented Dec.
5 through 8 in the Lydia Mendel-
sohn Theatre of the Michigan
League. Tickets may be ordered
from the University Players, Frieze
Building, Ann Arbor, enclosing a
stamped, self-addressed envelope.
The box office opens at 12:30 p.m.,
Dec. 3.

By RICHARD MERCER
Prof. Martin Dyck of the Ger-
man department outlined the di-
v e r g e n t moral paradoxes in
Goethe's "Faust" recently, com-
menting that by leaving the moral
questions unresolved, the issues
revealed in the paradoxes are left
open to personal inquiry
Speaking Wednesday evening at
the Hillel Foundation, Prof. Dyck
pointed out that "Faust" does not
converge on the moral plane, but
on the aesthetic plane. "Faust" is
engaging and real to the reader,
yet does not answer the questions
that arise from the moral para-
doxes that Goethe creates, he said.
Among the paradoxes mentioned
by Prof. Dyck is that of Faust's
continual striving for a state of
bliss. The paradox arises when
Faust dedicates himself to a life
of continual search.
Whither Bliss?
If Faust is to continually strive
for bliss throughout his life the
possibility of his attaining this,
bliss is excluded because he must
be forever searching.
Another paradox arises in the
"Prologue in Heaven." God states
that man is prone to err, but that
within himself he knows the right
and proper way to act while on
earth. God realizes that man is
naturally indolent and also real-
izes that it is Satan that makes
man active, Prof. Dyck said.
The paradox here, he added, is
that of the necessity of the Devil
to cause man to act. Coupled with
man's propensity to sin it seems
that man must start in darkness
and evil in order to comprehend'
the way to God, he said. This is
the paradox of good being depend-
ent on evil, of light coming from
darkness.
Seek Satiety
In "Faust" the paradox of pas-
sion yearning for satiety and
satiety yearning for passion is ap-
parent, Prof. Dyck noted. When
Faust, who has mastered all learn-
ing, envies Gretchen's simplicity,
the paradox of innocence and
knowledge is stated.
Faust has .rejected Christianity,
yet he is stopped in his suicide
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attempt by the sound of church
bells. According to Prof. Dyck, he
has renounced the Christian faith,
yet is still affected by it.
Faust's suicide attempt points
out the paradox of never being
able to understand life until life
has ended.
The issues revealed in these
paradoxes remain alive today and
are not resolved by Goethe in
"Faust."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 6)
Math. Feb. & June grads. Men & Wom-
en. R. & D., Des.
U.S. Gov't., NASA-Lewis Research
Center, Cleveland, Ohio-All Degrees:
AE & Astro., ChE, EE. EM, Instru., ME,
Met., Nuclear. BS: Sci. Engrg. & E
Physics. Men & Women. R. & D.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Bldg., during the following hours: Mon.
thru Fri. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30
til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, Part-
time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, Ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Rm. 2200, daily.
MALE
-Several Odd jobs posted on the bul-
letin board in this office.
-Several Physiological Subjects need-
ed.
1-Grad Electrical Engr. who has had
experience with an analog computer.
20 hours or more per week on a long
term basis.
FEMALE
1-To teach gymnastics on a part-time
permanent basis. Hours would be
flexible.
1-Keypunch operator with 2 years of
practical experience. Sat, and Sun.
nights, 8 to 11 p.m.

USIA Gives
Perspective
On U.S. Life
By PHILIP SUTIN
"It is our job to tell our people
about the United States," Mrs.
Shih-Chen 'Tung-Hua, senior-edi-
tor translator of the Chinese-Eng-
lish "Student Review," explained
recently.
The monthly United States In-
formation Service magazine, aimed
at college students, describes Unit-
ed States agriculture, science, lit-
erature, sports and other areas of
American life, she added. It also
is used as an English teaching aid.
The circulation of the free maga-
zine is 74,000-40,000 on Taiwan
and the rest in other Asian Chin-
ese-speaking communities.
The magazine concentrates on
background articles which explain
the United States, Mrs. T'ung not-
ed. Controversial, fast-changing
stories as integration at the Uni-
versity of Mississippi are unsuited
for the magazine as it is prepared
three months'in advance and de-
velopments may outdate the story.
The articles for "Student Re-
view" mostly are written by the
USIA in Washington, she explain-
ed. In Taipei, the magazine selects
suitable stories, translates them
into modern Chinese and then
sends the copy to Manila for
printing, Mrs. T'ung said.
As each issue requires 13 or 14
stories, there is no shortage of
suitable material, she noted.
Mrs. T'ung noted that "Student
Review" is one of a number of
services of USIS. This agency also
prepares news releases and back-
ground articles covering current
news involving the United States.
It also maintains radio, English
teaching and exhibit programs.

Give Something Unusual
-For Christmas!
INMD I A ART SHOP
330 Maynard-(across from Arcade)
TDOING IT THE HARD WAY y, H/
(GETTING RID OF DANDRUFFr THAT IS!)

Sarkisoy Views U.S., Soviet Orchestras'

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Both the United States and the
Soviet Union maintain a high
level of professional musical per-
formance and music education,
O. S. Sarkisov, artistic director of
the Leningrad Philharmonic Or-
chestra, said recently.
The conductors of United States
and USSR orchestras may differ
in national qualities, but they re-
main loyal to their primary task-
producing a true reading of the
thoughts of the composer as evi-
denced in the printed score, he
noted.
"The main similarity between
orchestras of your country and
those of mine is the high degree
of ensemble discipline, the orches-
tral precision. Because of this our
orchestras are better than many
European ones," Sarkisov ex-
plained.
Enjoy American Works
Of the repertoire of this 107-
member orchestra, 40 per cent is
modern music and 60 per cent con-
sists of music from other periods.
The Russian people enjoy listen-
ing to American works and look
forward to the visits of American
composers.
Recently Aaron Copland and
Lukas Foss conducted their com-
positions in the Soviet Union. "We
feel that this symbolizes our
friendly contacts," he commented.
The Leningrad Philharmonic
Orchestra plays only symphonic
music because there are other or-
chestras for opera. This orchestra
premieres many of the works of
Soviet composers.
Premiere Shostakovich
Since 1926, when it introduced
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 1 to
the repertoire, the Leningrad Phil-
harmonic has premiered almost all
of his music. In December, it will
perform his Symphony No. 13 for
the first time anywhere in the
world, Sarkisov noted.
In the Soviet Union a unique
CRGANIZATION
NOTICES
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Cost Luncheon Discussion:
"Social Science & Religion Implement-
ing Social Change," Merrill Jackson,
Nov. 16. Noon, 802 Monroe.
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Meeting
& Discussion-Speakers from Lebanon,
Nigeria & Inter-Varsity Staff, Nov. 16,
7:30 p.m., Natural Resources Bldg.
Newman Club, Band Dance-Collegi-
ate Five Band, Nov. 16, 8:30 p.m.; Com-
munion Breakfast, Nov. 18, After 9:30
a.m. Mass; 331 Thompson.
School of Education Student Council,
Nov. 16, 4:15 p m., UGL, Multipurpose
Room. Speaker: Jean George, "The Na-
ture that Goes into Books."
WZHAT A WELCOME
WHEN YOU GIVE

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system of giving assistance to
young composers is offered. A cdn-
ductor is assigned the task of per-
forming a new work so that the
composer can hear it and make
alterations which he might deem
advantageous. This creates a
friendly atmosphere in which good
new symphonic works are pro-
duced. Of course, experienced
composers rarely need this assist-
ance, he added.
Periodically, competitions are
held to select musicians to replace
the members who have either re-
tired or died. In order to preserve
good ensemble, the selection of
new musicians is an important
procedure. Among the members of
the Leningrad Philharmonic are
many conservatory professors and
international competition winners.
No Unemployment
There is no unemployment
among musicians. A graduate of
the conservatory is placed by the
Culture Minister in an orchestra
where a vacancy exists. A very
talented musician is never given a
position already occupied.

However, if a musician does notj
perform in a way pleasing to the
conductor, he is given a chance
to retire so that new talent can
take hi's place, Sarkisov explained.
Eugen Mravinsky has been chief
conductor of the Leningrad Phil-
harmonic since 1938. It was Mrav-
insky who premiered the Shosta-
kovich Symphony No. 5 in 1937
and it is this same man to whom
Shostakovich dedicated his eighth
symphony.
Fond of Bach
Mravinsky is especially fond of
the music of Bach, the romantics,
Wagner, Debussy and Ravel. He
also enjoys contemporary compo-
sition, Sarkisov noted.
At the beginning of each Amer-
ican concert the orchestra, now
on its first tour of the U. S., per-
forms both the Soviet and Ameri-
can national anthems as a symbol
of friendship and as a vehicle for
creating a friendly atmosphere.
This orchestra is participating in
the cultural exchange program be-
tween the governments of the So-
viet Union and the United States.

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