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November 16, 1962 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

V'E'T AV VAV7T~WA~V A Ae'EJ~A .F V av M- ul i Uo~

VILPA Y, iV V V r 1Y115 1L 1t3, 196 L

4

ECONOMIC COMMUNITY:
Montenegro Views
European Growth

H ipamonti Finds Jordan Pyramid

A state department official re-
turned to the University recently,
to offer some thoughts on "The
Evalution of the European Com-
mon Market" for a business ad-
ministration school audience.
Daniel W. Montenegro, acting
director of the Office of Public
Services, explained that the Com-
mon Market, having evolved from
several earlier and less binding
economic associations on the Con-
tinent, was the product of the
foresight of "men of the middle
border."
These men-including Robert
Schuman of Alsace and Konrad'
Adenauer of the Rhineland area-
saw that the only rational solu-
tion to the problem of Russian ex-
pansion was to make Europe's
economy as strong as possible.
Montenegro, who participated in
the business school's executive
development program this sum-
m r as the annual representative
from the state department, com-
mented.
Serious Rival
By 1960, the Common Market
had become a serious rival for
the European Free Trade Asso-
ciation, a more informal economic
organization.
Montenegro speculated that this
DeWitt To view
Soviet Manpower
Prof. Nicholas DeWitt of the In-
diana University education school
will discuss "Soviet Manpower Ad-
Vance" 4:10 p.m. today in Aud A.

By DEBORAH BEATTIE
A South American archaeolog-
ical expedition, led by Prof. Julio
Ripamonti of Venezuela Central
University, has unearthed a pyr-
amid about 20 miles south of Am-
man, Jordan, which is believed
to be associated with Moses.
The pyramid dates to the late
Bronze Age, around 1250 B.C. In-
side it is another smaller building
and in between the two are 12
small chambers which Ripamonti
believes may represent the 12
tribes of Israel.
The construction, which is about
140 feet high with walls 95 feet
wide, is one of the biggest single
structures ever unearthed in
Trans-Jordan or Canaan. The
outer pyramid was built with wals
6 feet thick, Ripamonti reported.
Ripamonti) believes that Moses'
tomb may be found under the
pyramid or in one of the rooms.
If the pyramid was not Moses'
tomb, he believes that it might
be a memorialsto mark the site
where Moses first saw the promis-
ed land.
Another alternative cited by
Ripamonti is that the pyramid
might be a temple for Bethpeor,
in which case he believes that
Moses' tomb should be somewhere
nearby.
Commenting on Ripamonti's
claim, Prof. George E. Mendenhall
of the Near Eastern Studies de-
partment, stated the connection
with Moses has very little plaus-
ibility.
"There is no reason to asso-
ciate this pyramid with Moses,
because the Israelites in the early
period were never in control of
the area in which the construc-
tion is located," he said.
In addition, Mendenhall pointed
out, the Israelites vigorously re-
jected the building of elaborate
tombs until 500 years after Moses.

The construction is probably
Moabite because it was found in
the heart of the ancient Moabite
territory, Mendenhall said.
"Monumental constructions such
as this are always connected with
kingships or ritualistic communi-
ties. We know that the Mohabites
had kingships. The early Israelites,
however, were opposed to king-
ships," he explained.
Mendenhall rejected Ripamonti's
theory that the pyramid might be
a memorial on the site from which
Moses first viewed the promised
land because it is located about
20 miles from Mt. Nebo, where
this event took place.
He agreed that the ' pyramid
possibly could be a temple con-
nected with Bethpeor.
"It remains to be seen whether
it is an unusually elaborate tomb
or a cult center, but it certainly
is not Mosaic," Mendenhall em-
phasized.
East of the pyramid an olive
press or wine press was unearthed
which indicates that the now bar-
ren area was cultivated 3,000 years
ago.
A cave with a limed ceiling con-
taining Bronze Age pottery and

GEORGE MENDENHALL
. disputes claim
human skulls and bones was found
south of the construction.
A huge rock basin and a stone
with an undecipherable inscrip-
tion also were discovered.
Excavations will be resumed
next August.

DANIEL MONTENEGRO
... Common Market

rivarly was the reason behind So-
viet Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
chev's breaking up of the Paris
summit conference of that year.
Unification
Instead of splitting further
apart, however, the European na-
tions united in the face of ad-
versity.
Now, with its timetable for poli-
tical and economic integration
about four years ahead of sched-
ule, the Common Market has put
a strain upon Communism because
the Marxian claim of the inAer
contradictions of international
capitalism is being disproven,
Montenegro said.

Wesley Cites Major Trends
In U.S. Teacher Education

To Present
world Fair
Exhibitions
The Michigan Union's annual
World's Fair, entitled "Seattle in
Ann Arbor," will today and to-
morrow feature displays from
many nations.
The event, which yearly attracts
more than 6,000 people, will be
held from 7 p.m. to midnight to-
day and from 1 p.m. after mid-
night tomorrow, in the Union.
More than 20 nationality clubs
of the University will construct
room-sized displays designed to
capture a part of their culture.
Some articles in the displays will
be on sale.
The clubs of African, Arabian,
Chinese, Estonian, Greek, Indian,
Indonesian, Iranian, Israeli, Jap-
anese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuan-
ian, Pakistani, Philippine, Puerto
Rican, Scandinavian, Thai, Turk-
ish, Ukranian and Venezuelan stu-
dents will present displays.
The "International T a 1 e n t
Scouts," a variety show featuring
foreign students, will be part of
the fair. The plot of the show is
an American producer's imaginary
journey around the world.
During his trip, he (and the
audience) will see such fanmous
performances as the Dance of the
Silver Plates from China, Indo-
nesia's Balinese Dance, the Lat-
vian Little Thunder Dance and
the Philippino Bamboo Pole
Dance.
Other acts include the Venezue-
lan Folk Dance, the Latin Parade
Combo, the Thai Candle Dance,
the Israeli Folk Dancers, the Fairy
Tales of Scandinavia, the Ukrain-
ian Kozachok Flirtation Dance
and the African Folk Festival.
Five shows, each lasting 90 min-
utes, will be presented at,8 p.m.
and 10 p.m. today. Tomorrow,
shows are scheduled for 7 p.m., 9
p.m. and 11 p.m.
Unlike the international world's
fairs, the Union's fair is an event
that occurs annually. Each fair
occurs near the end of the fall
season.
Refuses Review
Of Drug Decision
WASHINGTON - The Su-
preme Court refused yesterday to
reconsider its decision that a Cali-
fornia law requiring imprison-
ment of narcotics' addicts as crim-
inals inflicts cruel and unusual
punishment. This let stand the
ruling of last June 25 declaring
the law unconstitutional.

v - _ _ _____ _ -
;, __

v

N 4th WEEK
, iner of 10
2-26 ~uii~IIDIIuIIj'1~Academy Awards!
Dial 2-6264
PICTUREOF THEYEAR I
ANEW YORK FILM CRITICS' AWARD
"WEST SIDE STORY' IS A CIN-
EMA MASTERPIECE! THE PER-
FORMANCES ARE TERRIFIC!"
- Bosley Crowther, New York Times
Schedule of Performances
Mon. - Tues. - Wed.
at 2 and 8 p.m.
Fri.-Sat.-Sun. at 2,
6:45, 9:25 p.m.
Weekday Matinee 90c
Nights and Sunday $1.25
Children All Times 50c

-- ----m

..

By GERALD STORCH

Views Life of Fulbright Scholar in Japan

I

By BARBARA PASH
Japan is one of the most popu-
lar areas among Fulbright schol-
ars, Mrs. Yukiko Maki, American
Program Officer for the United
States Educational*Commission in
Ja ?an, said recently.
Mrs. Maki is in charge of all
Americans who receive Fulbright
grants to Japan. "Approximately
50 families come each year on one-
year grants. It is possible for a
Fullbrighter to renew his stay in
Japan and we make allowances in
our budget for this," she explain-
ed.
'he Fulbrighters are divided in-
to four categories: professors,
graduate student researchers, ad-
vaaced researchers and high school
teachers.
Oriental Studies
An advanced researcher is a pro-
fessor engaged n research studies.
A graduate student researcher is
usually a graduate student doing

research in relation to his doc-
torate. The researchers come
mainly for Oriental studies, she
said.
"Since it is very difficult to
teach or study in a foreign coun-
try without proper contacts, the
main task of our commission is
to provide each Fulbrighter with
a Japanese counterpart,'' Mrs.
Maki noted.
The counterpart-colleague helps
the American in his individual
field. The colleague is chosen ac-
cording, to the subject matter be-
ing studied or taught by the Ful-
brighter. "Some Americans already
have contacts in Japan, and then
it is unnecessary for our com-
mission to do much," she con-
tinued.
No Changes
"When I visited Washington
recently, I was told that Japan
has one of the best Fulbright pro-
grams in ;the world. Because of

MRS. YUKIKO MAKI
. Japanese Fulbrights

r

TI

FLYING HOME?
TAKE
WI LLOPOLITAN
TAXI TO THE AIRPORT
WILLOW RUN $1.25
METROPOLITAN $1.50
TICKETS ON SALE IN THE FISHBOWL
THUR., FRI., MON., TUES.

this, there are no changes con-
templated at the present time for
our program," Mrs. Maki re-
marked.
Theresponse in the Japanese
school system to Fulbright lectur-
ers, who speak on all fields, has
been very good, she noted.
"The American Fulbrighters
are a very good group with which
to work. The professors are usually
married, but the graduate students
are not," Mrs. Maki said.
George Talk Ends
Education Week

"If one is in a hurry to be on
the road again, he is tactful in
dealing with the mechanic who is
repairing his engine.
"So as a nation we have been
jolted into a realization that the
teacher is important, in fact, an
indispensable person," Prof. Ed
gar B. Wesley, who once taught
at the University and now teaches
at Stanford University and the
University of Texas, told an Amer-
ican Education Week Audience
here Monday.
Prof. Wesley examined the main
trends in teacher education since
!its inception in 1839. He noted
six main experimental programs
in the field and then turned to
some of the reasons why educa-
tors are "the hope of the future"
for America.
No Adequate Pre-Service
"Of considerable importance is
the very uncomforting conclusion
that after more than a century
of earnest efforts and a decade
of intensified experimentation, we
have not yet evolved a satisfactory
pre-service for teachers," he said,
as such a program is probably an
impossibility in a changing so-
ciety.
Secondly, "the American people
consciously and deliberately de-
cided upon teachers for all rather
than good teachers for a few ...
Emergencies in teacher supply
have been normal; hence even
today about seven per cent of
all certificates are issued to un-
qualified teachers.
"It may be that a similar choice
would have been made in medi-
cine if the people had had a
choice-any doctor rather than no
doctor, a poor plumber rather
than no plumber," Prof. Wesley
declared.
Increased Awareness
The third and final major trend
in teacher education is that "near-
ly every one is interested. Even
though the public may encumber
educators with advice and afflict
them with help, they do demon-
strate widespread concern. It may
be that society is about to decide
to educate its teachers."
As part of this concern inside
and outside the profession, a num-
ber of "rather impressive develop-
ments" have arisen during the past
decade in teacher training. Prof.
Wesley commented on a few:
Member of the Team
1) The enlistment of schools as
educators of their own teachers.
"Once, the school was the
chance scene of the practice
teacher; it tolerated rather than
accepted him." Now, however, the
educational intern has become "a
member of the team and not a
mascot.
"This transition of the practice
teacher from a brief trial without
much accountability to a prolong-
Berlyne To Speak
On Incongruity
Prof. Daniel E. Berlyne of the
University of Toronto will speak
on "Motivational Effects of Com-
plexity and Incongruity" at a psy-
chology colloquium at 4:15 today
in Aud. B.

ed period of full responsibility sig-
nifies that the school itself has
accepted the opportunity and re-
sponsibility for developing new
members of the profession," Prof.
Wesley said.
Stress Scholarship
2) Emphasis upon scholarship.
Educators have been placing
greater stress upon content and
subject matter in order to correct
what many felt was an over-
emphasis upon the child and upon
methods.
They realize, however, that
scholarship alone does not guar-
antee teaching success. "Even af-
ter the professors have delivered
all of their scholarly, materials,
the teacher must select, reorganize
and simplify. He is still the cur-
riculum maker."
Professors, Educators
3) Growing cooperation between
educators and academicians.
Mutual aid in matters of cur-
riculum planning ad psychologi-
cal, pedagogical and personal
problems in teaching and learning
has arisen between professors and
educators,. thus broadening the
functions of universities in teacher
training and strengthening their
professional programs.

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe Street
LUNCHEON DISCUSSIONS
12:00 Noon to 1:00 P.M.
25c
"SOCIAL SCIENCES AND RELIGION"
Tues., Nov. 13--The Role of Social Sciences in the
Process of Social Change"-Merrill Jackson
Fri., Nov. 1 6-"Social Science and Religion Implement-
ing Social Change"-Merrill Jackson
Tues., Nov. 20--"The Role of Religion in the Process
of Social Change"-Patrick Murray
Tues., Nov. 27-"Anthropological View of the Religious
lInstitution"-James Hamilton
Fri., Nov. 30-"Historical View of Religion in American
Society"-Norton Mezvinsky
NOTE
change in time for
Sunday Evening Guild gathering:
8:30 P.M.
Music, relaxed conversation, special refreshments
Congregational, Disciples, Evangelical t Reformed,
Evangelical United Brethren Campus Ministry.
iRK-GO[D-MAYER MICHIGAN PREMIERE
[O WN WED., NOV. 21st.
8:15 P.M.
NDO
TREVR

I

BANDDA
Friday, Nov. 16 . . . 8:30 p.m.
COLLEGIATE FIVE BAND
NEWMAN CENTER,
331 Thompson

ml NIKON RDSmllBE PRODUCTION
BOUNTY
s0
PILMED IN ULTRA PANAVISiON 710

k-

Jean George, author of several
books for children, will speak on
"The Nature that Goes into
Books" at 4:15 p.m. today in the
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.
The talk is given as the last in
a series of programs for American
Education Week.

HELD OVER

11

1 0 1 l !lh i"1i1 111

II

Dial
5-6290

SHOWS
at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.

Make Checks or Money Orders Payable to:
UNITED ARTISTS 140 Bagley Ave., Det. 26 I Box Office Open Daily
I Please Send................Orch. or Mezz. Q 2 NOON . 9 P.M.
SBl. Rows A-K .Bal. Rows L-R -R
Tickets at $ _ D. ~~. . ....,.For Mat. Q, Eve. Q -
Performance on1...~.Date 4BAGLEYAVE. DETROIT 4.MICH.
IAlternate Dates....... M....________IIATINEES: RCH. SAL. BAL.
WEMEII DNESDAY MEZZ. A-K LR*
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ADDRESS.. _.. _...........,~ SATURDAY AT 2 P.M. 2.00 1.60 1.4E
CITY__.....~~~....ZONE.-.....STATE--~..~~ SUN.&HOL.AT2P.M.25 2.8 0 0 1.50
Ecoecheck or money order (no stamps)' £vEN:NG8,
Eayabl to United Artists Theatrenaddressed j(SUN.thruTI ORS. ...$2.30 $2.00 $1.50
pp AT8:15P.M.
to Box Office with self-addressed stamped FRI., SAT. & 'OLS... 8.00 .30. 3.00
return envelope. AT 8:15 P.M.
La.-.----- -- - .- 411 Prices Include Fed. Tax
FOR GROUP SALES CALL MILDtRED ANDERSON, WO 5-5133.
RESERVATIONS AT ALL SEARS STORES: NOW.

r

I t I Illiarjj jju

--,,,,. .. , IIWIWu' "

1

MUSKET '62 presents

I
v
M
" t a
""{ t 3'a :I ' t.'
{

o'brien and james'
"'BARTHOLOMEY
i FAIR".
NOVEMBER 28-DECEMBER 1
Lydia Mendelssohn-Seats $1.50 and 2.00
ONLY A FEW TICKETS LEFT
For Friday and Saturday Nights
TICKETS ON SALE IN UNION LOBBY
12-5 P.M. Daily, 9-12 Saturday

A NEW JOY HAS COME TO
THE SCREEN...AND
THE WORLD IS A HAPPIER
PLACE TO LIVE IN!
GLEASON
*Pronounced SEE-©O
NEW
DIAL 8-6416

New from Kodak--

PUSH-BUTTON POWER!
PUSH-B TTO _____

KODAK

S.G.c. Cema 'u4
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00 Saturday and Sunday at 7:00 and 9:00
CITIZEN KANE DISNEY PROGRAM:
n 'A I.Jl.. 1 - . --.-. - - . -

lllk&uni&o

I

7:30
Monday through Friday

...

35

The First 3-Act Motion Picture Ever Presented!
JOSEPH E.
LEVINE j
Prwductd by
CARLO
PONTI
"The RAFFLE" "The TEMPTATION of Dr. ANTONIO" 'The JOB"

CAMERA

Winds film - sets lens - adjusts for flash
It's all automatic! A spring-driven motor automatically ad-
vances film for each exposure! Outdoors, an electric eye sets
the lens. Indoors, the lens opening automatically adjusts for
flash shots as you set the distance. Fast f/2.8 lens, with shutter

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