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November 16, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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uci

Court

Orders

Action

CONFERENCE ENDS:
Pledge Continued Berlin Aid

i

11

4

On Barnett Contempt

Educational
Interest Cited
By Rafferty
LOS ANGELES-Max Rafferty,
victorious candidate for state su-
perintendent of public instruction
in a contest unprecedented for
public interest, attributes his suc-
cess largely to grass roots concern
to get better 'public schools, the
Christian Science Monitor report-
ed recently.
According to the latest available
returns, Rafferty defeated Ralph
Richardson, member of the Los
Angeles City Board of Education,
by 2,528,712 to 2,319,590 votes.
Some 250 "Parents for Rafferty"
groups throughout the state cam-
paigned indefatigably for Raffer-
ty's program, which was mainly
directed to ridding the schools of
"progressive education," getting
the right for local school districts
to pick elementary school text-
books and reorganizing the educa-
tion department.
The nonpartisan race for state
superintendent of public instruc-
tion amounted to California's first
statewide debate over public school
policy and the candidates faced
each other before audiences 47
times.
Richardson spoke to the com-
plexity of public education prob-
lems in California's big urban ar
lems in California's big urban
areas. Rafferty called for new at-
tention to content.
"I am opposed to the currently
popular 'life adjustment' philoso-
phy in education," Rafferty said
repeatedly. "I would like to stress
the importance of subject matter."
Although the state superintend-
ency is nonpartisan, partisan views
evidently played a big part °n the
recent race.
Richardson had been a staff ad-
viser to Gov. Edmund G. Brown.
He had Brown's endorsement, was
endorsed by the Brown-appointed
State Board of Education, and had
the approval of the state's profes-
sional school associations.
Rafferty, as he has said, was a
grass-roots candidate. He had no
professional education association
backing. He was enthusiastically
supported by organizations and po-
litical groups that described them-
selves as conservative.
Roniney Ends
Last Bonds
With Business
By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Gov-elect George
Romney resigned yesterday as
vice-chairman and director of
American Motors Corp. and an-
nounced he will put income from
firm's stock into trust fund while
he is governor.
Romney thus severed official
connection with a company which
he led from a failing automobile
and appliance manufacturer into
a $50 million a year money maker.
He also announced that he was
placing his 104,000 shares of
American Motors stock in the
hands of a bank trustee "who will
manage and administer a trust,
for me, to permit no diversion of
my attention from the office to
which I have been elected."
Romney said that his options,
as an officer, to buy Amercian
Motors stock at less than the
market price ended with his resig-
nation. He said he had 90 days
in which to exercise options pre-
viously earned, "but I have made
no decision on these."

SMALL VOTE CHANGE:
Reid Indicates .doubts
About Seeking Recount
By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Despite picking up votes in Oakland and Jackson
Counties, Republican lieutenant gubernatorial candidate Clarence
A. Reid indicated he may not seek a recount in his narrow defeat
to Lt. Gov. T. John Lesinski.
Lesinski held a 3,470 vote lead over Reid, according to an
Associated Press tally yesterday of the official canvass of the Nov.

To Try Two
In Criminal
Charge Case

Face Fine,,
In Barring

Jail Term
Meredith

CHRISTIAN A. HERTER
... new post

6 votes from all Michigan coun-
ties except Genesee and Wayne.
Vote Totals
Genesee will report its official
totals today. Wayne will make its
vote official Monday.
Reid said last weekend he was
interested in a recount.
"I'd like to get Wayne and
Genesee in here to see whether
they will push it up any more. I
want them all in before I decide,"
he said.
"I figured I might have had a
chance on a recount if the dif-
ference had been 2100 or 2200
votes," Reid said. "But I don't
think a recount would do any
good if the difference stays up
around 3300."
Defeat Margin -
Reid had been told last Mon-
day by United Press International
that his margin of defeat was
slightly more than 2400 votes.
"I am neither encouraged nor
discouraged," he said. "I thought
it would be about 2300 votes. These
new figures make me have to ex-
amine the whole affair."
Reid said he had been examin-
ing areas for a possible recount.
"There are some in Kalamazoo,
Kent and Muskegon counties as
well as in Wayne where I would
want a new count, assuming I go
ahead and request it," he said.
Include County
Jackson County was included as
official even though its totals will
not be certified by the board of
canvassers until today. There was
a difference of 422 votes in Reid's
favor between the unofficial re-
turns and the figures of the county
clerk.
Associated Press figures elec-
tion night gave Lesinski a margin
of slightly more than 11,000 votes.
However, an error of 8,139 votes
was found in Tuscola County.

NEW ORLEANS (P)-The Fed-
eral Appeals Court directed the
Justice Department yesterday to
institute criminal contempt ac-
tion against Mississippi Gov. Ross
Barnett and Lt. Gov. Paul B.
Johnson.
The court earlier held the two
in civil contempt for their efforts
to block Negro James H. Mere-
dith from enrollment at the Uni-
versity of Mississippi.
For that, Barnett faces the pos-
sibility of jail and daily fines of
$10,000, and Johnson the possibil-
ity of daily fines of $5,000 until
such time as the court deems they
have purged themselves.
No Penalties
The court hasn't imposed any
penalties yet, pending a decision
on whether-and if so, when-the
two purged themselves of con-
tempt.
In Jackson, Barnett expressed
surprise at the court's action.
"I hadn't dreamed of it," he said.
Johnson said, "I have no com-
ment at all."
The Justice Department said in
Washington it would await receipt
of detailed instructions from the
court before acting.
Defy Orders
In defiance of federal court or-
ders, Barnett and Johnson each
personally blocked the 29-year-old
Nefro from entering the previous-
ly all-white University of Missis-
sippi and knocking down more
than ancentury of segregation
policy.
Accompanied by federal mar-
shals, Meredith arrived on the
campus Sept. 30. A night of riot-
ing followed with two men killed
and scores of marshals and stu-
dents injured. The university reg-
istered Meredith the next morn-
ing while federal troops moved in
to restore order.
Since then, Meredith has at-
tended the university under guard.
Federal marshals and about 500
Army troops remain.

WASHINGTON UP) - President
John F. Kennedy and West Ger-
man Chancellor Konrad Adenauer
pledged anew yesterday that West
Berlin's freedom will be preserved
in "all circumstances and with all
means."
The two leaders at the end of
two days of conferences issued a
joint communique in which they
agreed "a solution of the German
question can be found only in the
preservation of the right of self-
determination" for the West Ber-
liners.
The communique reported the
consultations "were conducted in
a relaxed and friendly spirit which
has become traditional in the rela-
tions between the two govern-
ments" and noted that the two
men "dealt in particular with
events relating to Cuba."
Praise Handling
Adenauer early in his visit had
praised Kennedy's handling of the
Cuban situation and agreed that
its final solution must be the No.
1 concern of the United States at
this time.
The communique said that in
addition to Cuba a wide variety of
other common problems were dis-
cussed. These included the over-
all German situation, allied plan-
ning for any emergency, the fu-
ture of the Atlantic alliance and
the political and economic inte-
firation of Europe under the Com-
mon Market.
The President and the chancel-
lor, the communique declared, were
agreed that the Atlantic alliance
"continues to be the basis for the
maintenance of freedom."
'Full Agreement'
"The conversations have shown
that. both governments are in full
agreement in their assessment of
the international situation. The
meeting has reaffirmed the very
close cooperation, based on the
friendship of the two peoples,
which exists between the two gov-
ernments," the communique con-
cluded.
Adenauer returns to Germany
today.
Earlier; the chancellor confer-
red with Secretary of State Dean
Rusk at the State Department dis-
cussing mainly problems of NATO
and the European Community.
At noontime, Adenauer made his
now traditional public appearance
nwp

KONRAD ADENAUER
... German solution

with restraint as the crisis "is not
entirely over."
"If you think," Adenauer said,
"on the various lies (Soviet Pre-
mier Nikita S.) Khrushchev has
told the Americans, then in the
future you will attach less import-
ance to what he says and more to
what he does."
First Danger
He called the Cuban crisis "the
first direct and mortal danger" the
American people had to face and
declared that "they stood the trial.
"When I hear about coexistence
in the future, I will think of Cuba,
and so will many others," he said.
The firm stand of the United
States in the Cuban crisis may
force the Soviets to review their
position on Berlin, Adenauer said,
and advised patience on the Ber-
lin issue.
Adenauer said the Soviet adven-
ture into nuclear bases in Cuba
and the Red Chinese invasion of
India constituted a striking coin-
cidence and declared, "never in
all the years of the struggle against
Communism have there been so
many acts of aggression as in the
last few weeks."

attending a luncheon with Wash-
ington newsmen at the National
Press Club.
Express Respect
Speaking extemporaneously, Ad-
enauer told reporters that the Ger-
mans had great respect for the at-
titude of the American people dur-
ing the "most grave weeks" of the
German crisis.
The Western world, he advised,
should assess the Cuban situation

at Michigan Union
SEATTLE
in
ANN
ARBOR
1962
World's Fair
TONIGHT
7-12 P.M.
TOMORROW
12 noon-i. A.M.

Returns Set
Peabody Win
BOSTON OP) - Official returns
confirmed yesterday that Demo-
crat Endicott (Chub) Peabody de-
feated the Republican incumbent,
John A. Volpe, by 3,091 votes in
their contest for Massachusetts
governor.
The official count -of the votes
cast Nov. 6 gave Peabody 1,051,653
to 1,048,562 for Volpe.

European Student
Exchange Program
Summer Exploration
of Europe--$598.00
-------------
For eligibility details
mail coupon to:
International Student Exchange
409 Waldron Street
West Lafayette, Ind.

Name.

I

Address

"IN

i

Name Herter
As Negotiator
On U.S. Trade'
WASHINGTON UP) - President
John F. Kennedy picked Christian
A. Herter, former Republican sec-
retary of state, yesterday to be the
top man for the United States in
the new foreign tradenegotiating
program.
Kennedy said Herter will be
"one of the top policy officials of
the United States government in
shaping and achieving our inter-
national objectives in the commer-
cial, trade and economic fields."
Herter will have the key role
in one of the major programs
enacted by the last Congress. It
provides sweeping authority for
the administration to wipe out
some tariffs and cut others
The President recently took the
initiative in trade negotiations
when he urged a conference of the
General Agreement on Tariff and
Trade nation for next spring in a
letter to Canadian Prime Minister
John Diefenbaker.
Herter was secretary of state
from 1959 through the close of
the Eisenhower administration to
January, 1961.
National
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Strong indica-
tions that Red China and perhaps
France may have an arsenal of
nuclear weapons in the near fu-
ture became public yesterday in
censored testimony by Secretary'
of State Dean Rusk and disarma-
ment officials.
* * *
NEW YORK-The stock market
slid into an irregular decline yes-
terday. The Dow-Jones 30 indus-
trials were down 1.34, the 20 rail-
roads, down .07, the 15 utilities,
down .12 and the 65 stocks, down
.34.

11

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