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November 11, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-11

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PAGE Two

TAE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNAY NOVEMBER. '. 1.1982

PAGETWOTHE ICHGANDAIL STNDAY T"flViwR~ 111_.

.a va acra .a.y } v ai lru L' iL l.ir 1.7 UG

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RISING DEMAND:
Bureau Places 'U' Graduates

'OPERATION AMIGO:'
Brazilian Students Tour 'U' Campus

r: - -

By THOMAS HUNTER
Where do they go? Out.
What do they do? Work.
That's the story of hundreds of
seniors and graduate students as
seen by Evart W. Ardis, director
of the Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information,
every year. The Bureau embodies
th, University's job placement and
career counseling services.
New Quarters
In the Bureau's recent annual
report Ardis notes expanded facil-
ities in the Bureau's new quarters
atop the Student Activities Bldg.
He reports that a "rising demand
for graduate degree holders in
business, government and educa-
tion and the continuing demand
for bachelor degree candidates"
mE.de last year "the most reward-
ing in the history of the Bureau."
But as the Bureau heads into a
new season, Ardis, who got his-
own start through the placement
service at Northwestern Univer-
sit:y,-warns that too many students
are neglecting to take advantage
of his office.
Ardis heads what is called a
"coordinated placement" program
under which several schools, such
as those of business administra-
tion, chemistry, engineering and
law, run their own separate offices.
The Bureau provides a central of-
fice "so that an employer wishing
to recruit at two or more offices
can make arrangements for the
de ;ails of his visit through a single
contact." It also provides place-
ment service where there are no
eparate facilities, particularly in
the literary -college and school of
education.
Counseling Services
Any University student with a
minimum of 12 hours credit, be-
hi id him can register in the
Bureau anduse its counseling ser-
vices for the rest of his life. A
complete reference file is main-
Steerin Unit
To Open .TIalk
On: Counseling
The Steering Committee of the
literary college will hold an open
meeting at 4 p.m. tomorrow in
room 1402 of Mason Hall to con-
sider the problems of adequate
counseling for students.
Several plans for supplementary
counseling programs to be run by
students will be considered. Com-
ments and suggestions on propos-
ed projects such as a descriptive.
booklet containing information on
course requirements and materials,
an evaluative booklet rating
courses, student counselors, and
panel discussions in certain fields
will be offered.

tained for each student and is
kept up at his request. Ardis esti-
mates that his offices -hold over
65;000 alumni and current files.
In a typical recruiting season,
Ardis says the Bureau does busi-
ness with as many as 2200 school
districts and up to 3000 compan-
ies, which can bring in as much
as eight bushels of mail a day.
Interviewers.- usually come with
specific jobs to fill and when jobs
are scarce will continue to send
representatives to maintain con-
tact with possible future employes.
Recruiting "has been on the up-
swing for many years," Ardis said.
"We are experiencing nothing but
a growing thirst by employers for
college educated people. They want
and need more highly trained,
bright young people."
Degree Emphasized
The emphasis in recruiting indi-
cates that 'those with graduate
and professional degrees are the
center of the greatest demand. It
is estimated that "at least two-
thirds of the requests received by
the Bureau are for alumni with
experience." This is also reflected
in-starting salary levels.
The average for all is up over
that of last year, -but bachelor's
degree graduates brought in an
avreage $500 monthly maximum.
whilethose with masters' degrees
earned $600. Women in these cate-
gories got approximately $100 less.
In education college teacher wages
rose $500 up to $6500 and the ele-
mentary teacher starting salary*
range fell between $4800-5000.
In placement carried on outside
the Bureau in .the business admin-
istration, engineering, forestry and
geology schools, and chemistry de-
partment, 769 candidates reported
placement. Pay differences be-
tween degree holders were great-
est between the master and doc-
torate levels. In business adminis-
tration, chemistry, and engineer-
ing the difference meant $200 or
more and in geology $350. The
spread between the -bachelor and
master level ranged -from $60 to.
$150.
Demand Increasing
Ardis notes, "It is cleardthat the
demand, for college graduates is
increasing more rapidly than the
supply." Education is experienc-
ing acute shortages, especially
since a 34 per cent increase in
requests for college teachers with
doctorates hasbeen met with "only
a slight increase in the number of
available candidates."
"There has been a real measure
of success here in placing students.
Invariably employers are pleased
and feel fortunate to get students
from the University." He credits
this to the University's "high
standards of admission and the
quality of instruction."
The decentralized placement
system brings the employer into
more personal contact with pro-

fessor and student, Ardis points
out. This is to the benefit and
the preference of the employers
"who like the personal touch,"
especially in business administra-
tion and engineering and other
fields of technical nature.
Since the Bureau handles the
preponderance -of bookkeeping
and keeps most of the records (the
schools themselves maintain no
permanent files), there is little
duplication of function.
Personal Contact
He says that the most successful
placement is done through close
especially interested in finding
personal contact. The faculty is
opportunities f o r " outstanding
students" so that they can realize
their potential on the job.
In the literary college the Bu-
reau maintains liaison with facul-
ty "contacts" who watch "out-
standing people" in the various
departments to "make sure they
get the right jobs." Schools like
the department of journalism run.
their own informal placement and
counseling services.
The activity of the Bureau it-
self actually ranges far beyond
the University, which Ardis says
was one of the first to "go in for
formal placement." There is a
network of national associations
to encourage inter-university co-
operation in helping students and
alumni. The Bureau's own staff
often stumps meetings and con-
ventions that bring employers and
prospective employes together.
Studies Trends
Ardis himself does much to find
and place superintendents for
school districts around the coun-
try. At a recent meeting of Mich-
igan school superintendents he
and his staff tried to spot trends
in employment in education and
also took the opportunity to talk
to educators who had jobs to fill
or who were considering switch-
ing jobs themselves.
Other functions of the Bureau
include setting appointments and
providing rooms for interviews.
(1328 were held last year), notify-
ing, all. registrants of weekly in-
terviewing schedules, maintaining
a library and a list of current
openings, sponsoring panel dis-
cussions on various career fields
and providing a reference book
to each applicant listing every
company "which is reputable and
ethical."
The, Bureau is most active in
the educaton -field. It numbers
2900 active registrants in that di-:
vision and less than halfthat in
Its general division. There were,
however, 2500 more personnel re-
quested last year in the latter
than In the former division.
About 400 alumni and students,
including 110 seniors, used the
career counseling service.

By STEVEN HALLER
A group of 25 high school stu-
dents from Sao Paolo, Brazil, on
a tour of the University yesterday,
brought a part of "Operation
Amigo" to Ann Arbor.
"Operation Amigo" is the brain-
child of the Miami Herald, which
serves as a coordinating agent for
the activities involved, as a non-
profit organization called "Opera-
tion Amigo, Inc." Through the ef-
forts of this group, various United
States cities arrange to act as
hosts for visiting, Latin American
students.
Host city for the visiting Bra-
zil students is Flint. The students
are thus the first group to travel
this far north. according to George
W. Eyster of the Flint Board of
Education, leader of the tour.

Eyster explained that there are
currently 14 different groups of
Latin American students engaged
in similar tours branching out
from the East Coast. "A West
Coast newspaper chain has devel-
oped the same idea and is plan-
ning to branch out from the West
Coast next year," he added.
While in Flint, the Brazilians
are the guests of students of
Flint's Northern High School,
Eyster went on. Each visitor is
assigned to live with one of the
American students during the 19
days of the visit. They attend
classes with their hosts and even
go to local dances with them,
learning the twist and showing
the American students the samba
in return.
Besides dancing, the visitors at-

tend football games with their
"amigos," including yesterday's
game with Illinois. Their tour of
the University has taken them to
various campus attractions.
Speak English
Most of the visiting Brazilian
students speak "pretty fair Eng-
lish," and their only problem in
being able to communicate freely
with their hosts lies not in their
lack of comprehension of our
tongue, but ratherin the speed
in which Americans speak, Eyster
commented.
The prevalent opinion among
the foreign visitors was that
America was a very new country
and that the University was quite
unlike anything the Brazilian stu-
dents hadmback home; although
one of them pointed out that the
University of Sao Paulo, when it
opens next year, will be some-
what similar.
DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
Feature 15 Minutes Later
A NEW JOY HAS COME TO THE SCREEN...AND
THE WORLD 5 AHAM PE TLIVE 11

Program Notes

The Leningrad Philharmonic
Orchestra, conducted by Eugene
Mravinsky, will perform tomorrow
at 8:30 p.m. in Hill Aud.
The program will consist of
"Overture to Marriage of Figaro"
by Mozart, "Music for Strings,
Percussion and Celesta" by Bar-
tok, and "Symphony No. 5" by
Shostakovich. The concert is be-
ing given as part of the Cultural
Exchange Program maintained by
the United States department of
state and the Soviet ministry of
culture.
Symphony Orchestra.. .
The University Symphony Or-
chestra under the direction of
Josef Blatt will present a concert
in Hill Aud. Thursday at 8:30 p.m.

history departments and the law
school will diccuss the modern
restrictions'upon the free enter-
prise of ideas and the major is-
sues involved in the public and
private censorship of books, mag-
azines, and films at 8:30 p.m.
Sunday on WXYZ TV.
Trombone Recital...
Kenneth Mieson, accompaniel
by pianist Carolyn Foltz, will give
a degree trombone recital at 4:15
p.m. Sunday, in Lan Hall Aud.
Administration . .
Alfred Diamant, of Haverford
College, will discuss "Administra-
tion and Political Development:
Some Preliminary Considerations"
at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the West
Conference Rm., Rackham.
Debates..,
The Oxford University Varsity
Debate Team (affirmative) will
compete with the University Var-
sity Debate Team (negative) on
the question, "Should Radio and
Television Broadcasting Be Re-
moved from Commercial Owner-
ship?" at 4 p.m. Tuesday in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
French Film ...
The Film Board of United Na-
tions Movies will present the
French motion picture "Passion
for Life" at 8 p.m. Tuesday in
the Architecture Auditorium.
Harpsichordist ..
Fernando Valenti, guest harp-
sichordist, will play selections by
Farnaby, Handel, Mozart, and
Bach at 8:30 p.m.' on Wednesday
in Rackham Lecture Hall.,
Classical Greece ....
Victor L. Ehrenberg, from the
University of London, will speak
on "Society and Civilization in the
Archaic Age of Greece" at 4:10
on Thursday in Aud. A.
German Lecturer.. .
Lutenist and singer from Ham-
burg, Germany, Karl Wolfram will
speak on "German Lieder from
the Middle Ages to Modern Times"
on Thursday at 8 p.m. in Aud. A.
Recital . .
Morris Hochberg, violinist, will
perform at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov.
18 in Aud. A.

DIAL jj CONTI NUOUS.
8-6416 TODAY
t d~m mFROM 1 P.M.
"6A Great French Film !"
-BOSLEY CROWTHER, N.Y. Times
rARE CAYATTE'S
f-
Tomorrow
tur
r ~~~Golden Lion ;.. "
VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
1st prize
NICOLE COURCEL
GEORGES RIVIERE
CORDULA TRANTOW
"AN EXCEPTIONAL PICTURE I
N Y. Herald-Tribune
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
Alfred Hitchcock's
LIFEBOAT
with Tallulah Bankhead, John Hodiak,
Walter Slezak, William Bendix,
Hume Cronyn
NEXT WEEK: Citizen Kane
And Sat. & Sun.: Disney Program
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

(

4r

1

JACKIE GLEASON
* 6160 1
*Pronounced GEE-G0

HELD OVER AGAIN !
FOR A THIRD AND FINAL WEEK
"THE MOST ADVENTUROUS MUSICAL ' FILM EVER MADE!"
-Life Magazine
"ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING PICTURES HOLLYWOOD HAS MADE.
IT LITERALLY EXPLODES ON THE SCREEN !" -Redbook

JOSEF BLATT
... conducts symphony

Ann Arbor Symphony,.
Prof. William D.Fitch of the
music school will conduct the Ann
Arbor Symphony Orchestra in its
first concert of the 1962-63 season
at 4 p.m. today in the Ann Arbor
High School Aud. Pianist Barbara
Holmquest will be featured at
the concert.
Opera ...
The New York City Opera Com-
pany will present Mozart's "The
Marriage of Figaro" at 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 17, and Verdi's
"Rigoletto" at 2:30 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 18, in Hill Aud.
Scientist Speaks .. .
Nuclear physicist Noah Sher-
man of the Department of Phy-
sics will speak on the growing
division between the scientist and
the non-scientist in this week's
program in the University Tele-
vision series "The Nuclear Age,"
at 8 a.m. Sunday.
Music Society Lecture . .
O. S. Sarkisov, artistic director
of the Leningrad Philharmonic,
will discuss the Leningrad Phil-
harmonic and the program it will
present for the Musical Society.
The address will be given at 8:30
p.m. tonight in the Michigan Un-
ion Ballroom.
Ruibens and Picasso .. .
Professors Guy Palazzola and
Victor Miesel will contrast the
lives and careers of Peter Paul
Rubens and Pablo Picasso in an
effort to 'explain the change of
the artist's role in society today
at noon on WWJ TV.
Censorship ...
A panel consisting of adpub-
lishing novelist from Saline and
members of the philosophy and

"'WEST SIDE STORY' IS A CIN-
EFA MASTERPIECE! THE PER-
FORMANCES ARE TERRIFIC!"
-Bosley Crowther, New York Times
"AN ALL-STAR BLOCKBUSTER!"
-Justin Gilbert, New York Daily Mirror
"A SUPERB ACCOMPLISHMENT!
SO TRIUMPHANT THAT ONE IS
STUNNED BY ITS SUCCESS !"
-Paine Knickerbocker,
San Francisco Chronicle
DIAL 2-6264
NEXT
"THE CHAPMAN
REPORT" Uni

"GREATEST PICTURE OF THE
YEAR !" : Harrison Carroll,
Los Angeles Herald & Express
"NOTHING SHORT OF SPECTAC-
ULAR! DOWNRIGHT ELECTRI-
FYING I"
-Sandra Sanders, Philadelphia Daily News

"ONE OF
TIONAL,
THIS OR

THE MOST SENSA-
EXCITING FILMS OF
ANY OTHER YEAR !"
--James O Neill, Jr.,
Washington Daily News

POLICY
Mon., thru. Wed. 2 & 8 P.M.
Sunday
at 2:00-6:45-9:25 P.M.
Week Day Matinee 90c
Nights and Sunday $1.25

... . . . .~ ...A~tt.:A~..,A~fl . . . . . . .r
."."::.. . . ."... . . ."v. . ...>rw."r:"." .>v" t" r Y "f :r..r :":i°
".".SW:.W."Aw.V.W . . . .

'U

SOPH ,SHOW

'62

THE MICHIGAN UNION

BYE BYE BIRDIE

YOUR KEY TO SUCCESS

Nov. 1

5,

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&

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JOIN
The Michigan Union,

Tickets at Lydia Mendelssohn Box Office

MUSKET '62 presents
o'brien and james'BATOOE A R
BARTHOLOMEW FAIR?
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AC

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