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November 03, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Yemen Forces Massing
As New Regime Plots
I Saudi Arabian Attack

U.S. Sends Weapons
To Aid Indian Army
NEW DELHI (M)-United States Air Force transports sped to
India yesterday with weapons to help that nation fight off Chinese
Communist invaders.
With the launching of the American arms airlift, United States
Ambassador John Kenneth Galbraith pointedly told Prime Minister
Jawaharlal Nehru's government "the great task remains with the In-
dian army." Indian forces yesterday checked-at least temporarily--
the Chinese drive. But the Com-'

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Khrushchev,_Ulbricht Meet

ADENAUER:
Cabinet Split by Arrest
Of Magazine Officials
BONN (M)-Chancellor Konrad Adenauer's delicately balanced
coalition government teetered last night because of a dispute over a
government order to arrest top officials of the popular magazine Ver
Spiegel.
Justice Minister Wolfgang Stammberger refused to withdraw
his resignation and his conservative Free Democratic Party threat-
ened to end its partnership with Adenauer's Christian Democrats.
v Four other Free Democrats in Ade-

I

Space Probe
k Mars-1 Heads
To, Rendezvous
MOSCOW (M)-The Soviet Un-
ion's big unmanned space labora-
tory, "Mars-1," sped yesterday to-
ward a rendezvous with the planet
Mars with all systems working nor-
mally, Soviet reports said.
The 1,970-pound space vehicle,
packed with photographic and
other scientific equipment, was
the heaviest ever sent on an in-
terplanetary flight.
It was launched yesterday from
a; space platforms orbiting the
earth. The platform, believed to
be similar to one that sent a sim-
ilar vehicle toward Venus Feb. 12,
1961, was estimated to weigh about
six tows.
1964
Soviet commentators yesterday
carefully pointed out that the
Americans don't plan to try a
Mars shot until sometime in 1964.
The Soviet reports have not in-
dicated whether Mars-1 is intend-
ed to hit the planet. Indications
are that it will photograph Mars
without striking its surface.
Also, it was not clear from So-
viet announcements how far the
space vehicle would travel on its
seven-month flight to the distant
planet.
Neighbors
Mars' orbit swings within 34 mil-
ion miles of earth at its closest
point, and about 250 million miles
at its farthest point.
The Soviet space shot was the
first attempt to reach Mars.
The Russians lost contact with
the space station they launched
last year toward Venus. An Ameri-
can Venus-bound vehicle is expect-
ed to rendezvous with Venus in
December.
Soviet announcements have said
two-way radio contact with Mars-
1 has been good.
"Orders sent to the station were
well received and obeyed," it was
reported.
In addition to photographing the
planet Mars, the space station is
designed to send back to earth
data picked up on its way. But the
space station's main mission is to
unlock the secrets of the earth's
most mysterious neighbor.

nauer's cabinet threatened to fol-
1ow in Stammberger's footsteps.
Bypassed
The justice minister submitted
his resignation Wednesday, charg-
ing he had been bypassed by gov-
ernment officials who ordered the
arrest of Der Spiegel's publisher
and three editors on suspicion of
high treason for allegedly printing
military secrets.
Stammberger had said he would
withdraw his resignation only if
the 86-year old chancellor met cer-
tain conditions and guarantees by
yesterday.
At the deadline, the Free Dem-
ocrats announced Stammberger
had received a response from Ade-
nauer but that it was "fully unsat-
isfactory" and "provocative."
If and Only
The party then went into an
extraordinary meeting to decide
on tactics. A party spokesman said
it would demand the ouster of the
number two men in the justice and
defense ministries-Walter Strauss
and Volkmar Hopf-as their price
for peace with Adenauer.
The party considers these two
officials responsible for withhold-
ing information of the arrests-at
the instigation of the Christian
Democrats.
Sues Officials
BILOXI () - A University of
Mississippi junior from nearby
Handsboro, Miss., filed a $40,000
damage suit yesterday against fed-
eral officials who directed enroll-
ment of a Negro at the university.
The student, Cyril Faneca Jr.,
charged he was deprived of his
constitutional rights of freedom of
speech and freedom of assembly.
He asked a declaratory judgment,
$40,000 in damages and costs.
Named defendants were James
P. McShane, chief U.S. marshal
who was in charge of federal mar-
shals during Ole Miss rioting a
month ago; Nicholas Katzenbach,
assistant U.S. attorney general who
directed Justice Department activ-
ities at the campus in the enroll-
ment of Negro James H. Meredith;
and others.
The suit is a 12-page document
relating to activities of govern-
ment officials, marshals and troops
in the university integration situa-
tion.

Action Called
Self Defense
By Baydany
Report Nasser Aiding
With Arms, Troops
DAMASCUS (A')- The revolu-
tionary republic of Yemen, San'a
Radio announced, last night its
land and sea forces are massing
along the frontiers in readiness to
invade the neighboring kingdom
of Saudi Arabia when ordered.
The broadcast said the Yemeni
air force-presumably augmented
by Soviet warplanes from the Unit-
ed Arab Republic-was ordered at
the ready.
The announcement was attrib-
uted to the Yemeni vice premier
and foreign minister, Abdul Rah-
man Al-Baydany.
Compelled
The broadcast from the revolu-
tionary capital reported Baydany
said Yemen's republican regime
was "compelled to take this dras-
tic action in self defense" follow-
ing alleged attempts to invade
Northern Yemen by "5,000 Saudi
and Jordani regular troops."
"We have ordered our striking
armed forces to march north and
also ordered our naval units to
move northward and stand prepar-
ed to enter Saudi Arabian terri-
tory when ordered," Baydany said,
according to San'a Radio.
Baydany said armed forces have
been deployed on Yemen's north-
ern frontier and the navy has sail-
ed northward in the Red Sea from
the Soviet-built port of Hodeida.
Pouring Arms
President Gamal Abdul Nasser
of the United Arab Republic has
been reported pouring arms, para-
troopers and naval units into re-
publican Yemen while the Saudi
Arabian and Jordanian kingdoms
are backing the dethroned Imam
Mohammad Al-Badr in his bid to
win back his throne. He was top-
pled-and for a time reported dead
-by Yemen's strongman and new
president, Brig. Abdulla Al Sallal.
Baydany charged Saudi Arabia
and Jordan had attempted "out-
right invasion" of Yemen from the
north during the last two days,
San'a Radio said.

munists appeared massing to re-
sume their offensive.
All Quiet
An Indian defense ministry
spokesman reported the front quiet
for 24 hours, with the only shoot-
ing "some exchange of fire in the
vicinity of Walong, 15 miles west
of the Burma border."
The other major Communist
move into Northeastern India near
the captured monastery town of
Towang stalledmas Indian troops
prepared a defense line behind the
fallen outposts.
The United States made it clear
the military aid being rushed to
India is confined to arms and will
include no men.
No Prestidigitation
Galbraith cautioned the Indians,
whose defenses were neglected in
pursuance of a passive, neutralist
policy, against expecting American
weapons alone to "work magic."
Speaking to newsmen, he said:
"We are happy to help with
equipment to stop aggression but
equipment is only part of the prob-
lem.
UN Resolution
Seeks To Expel
Africa
By The Associated Press
After weeks of bitter debate, a
resolution seeking the expulsion of
South Africa from the United Na-
tions was overwhelmingly adopted
Friday over United States and
British objections in the General
Assembly's Special Political Com-
mittee.
The resolution, cosponsored by
33 Asian and African countries,
passed by a vote of 60-16 with 21
abstentions.
An attempt by Guatemala to
soften the resolution condemning
South Africa's racial discrimina-
tion policies was defeated. Jose
Luis Mendoza, the Guatemalan
delegate, charged that the Assem-
bly could not impose sanctions on
a state. This, he added, is the duty
of the Security Council.
The wide support that the Asian-
African bloc had gained for the
vote in the committee was be-
lieved to assure the resolution's
passage in the Assembly. Only
Thursday, Western sources had
predicted the defeat of the resolu-
tion.

Judge Refuses
To Drop Ban
DETROIT (') - Circuit Judge
Joseph A. Sullivan refused yester-
day to dismiss a temporary re-
straining order obtained by the
state Deemocratic Party chairman
against activities of the commit-
tee for honest elections.
Democratic State Chairman
John J. Collins contends the com-
mittee is attempting to "intimi-
date voters" through circulation of
a letter that quotes only parts of
Michigan's laws and constitutional
provisions regarding voter regis-
tration.

M Ssy The Associated Pressia .
MOSCOW -- Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev and East German
Communist Party boss Walter Ul-
bricht met yesterday at Soviet
Party headquarters,Tass report-
ed. "A broad exchange of opinion
took place on questions of con-
cern to the two sides," the Soviet
news agency said. "The meeting
was marked by a spirit of sincere
friendship and cooperation and
brought out complete identity of
views on all questions under dis-
cussion."
* * *
NEW YORK-Joint peace talks
got nowhere yesterday as the
American Newspaper Guild press-
ed its strike against the New York
Daily News through a second day.
The face to face negotiations were
the first since 1,100 Guild editor-
ial and commercial employes
struck the News at midnight Wed-
nesday.
* * *
WASHINGTON - At President
John F. Kennedy's request, West
German Chancellor Konrad Ade-
nauer has postponed for a week-
from Nov. 7 to Nov. 14--his visit

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS-DEPT. OF SPEECH
PRESENTS
LAST PERFORMANCE
Carlo Goldoni's
hilarious force
The SERVANT of
TWO MA STERS
8:00 P.M. TRUEBLOOD AUD., FRIEZE BLDG.
$1.75-$1.25
BOX OFFICE OPENS 12:30
For information-663-6470 or Univ. ext. 2235

CCOME

to Washington, the White House
announced yesterday.
* * *
BALTIMORE -- Former Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower re-
newed last night his plea to the
nation to stand behind President
ACLU Fights
Speaker Bart
By The Associated Press
Attorneys for the Southern Cal-
ifornia section of the American
Civil Liberties Union Thursday
asked a state appellate court to
throw out a University of Califor-
nia ban on Communist speakers.
A California superior court last
May ruled that the institution's
regents were within their legal
powers in denying the applications
of students seeking to invite Amer--
ican Communists to speak.

John F. Kennedy in the Cuban
crisis but urged voters to "produce
a flood of Republican votes" next
Tuesday. Carrying his campaign-
ing into a normally Democratic
steel mill area, Eisenhower said
"Americans without regard to poli-
tical affiliation must stand behind
the President as he seeks to lead
us to a peaceful and honorable
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy spent an hour and
ten minutes yesterday talking to
the new Yugoslav ambassador who
came on a routine mission of pre-
senting his credentials.
NEW YORK-The stock market
closed higher again yesterday after
a hectic session. The Dow Jones
averages closed at 604.58, while
the Associated Press average of 60
stocks showed industrials up 3.8,
rails up 1.1, and utilities up .7.

'r O

CHlUllRH

Re-elect

George Meader
to Congress
.4. .. . .
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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
intendent. Prefer Metallurgical or Mech.
Engrg. degree. Minimum of 8 to 10 yrs.
In industry with at least 3-5 yrs. spe-
cializng in gray iron foundry super-
vision work.
For further information, please call
Genera1 Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule at 128-H West
Engrg. Bldg.
NOV. 6-8-
The Bendix Corp. Mr. Cleveland will
represent ALT. DIV. not scheduled to
be on Campus & will also counsel all
students uncertain of Div. of greatest
interest-All Degrees: AE & Astro., EE,
EM & ME. Feb. grads. Men & Women.
R.'& D.. Des.
rBendilx. Lakeshore Div., St. Joseph,
Mich..-BS-MS: ME. Feb. grads. Dev. &
Iles.
Dendix--Missiles, Mishawaka, Ind.-
All Degrees: BE, EM & ME. MS-PhD: AS
& Astro. Prof.: Applied Mech. Men &
Women. R. & D., Des., Engrg. Trng.
Prog.
Bendix-Automotive Div., South Bend,
Ind.-BS: ME. Feb. & June grads. Men
women. Des., Test & Dev.
Benudix--Research Labs., Southfield,
Mih.-MS.PhD: AE & Astro., Com-
mnun. Sd., BE, EM. Instru., Met. & Nu-
clear. Frof.: Applied Mech. Feb. grads.
Men & Women. R. & D., Des.

Bendix--Systems Div., Ann Arbor,
Mich.---All Degrees: AS & Astro., EE,
Instrumentation & Nuclear. BS: B Math
& E Physics. Feb. grads. Men & Women.
R. & D., Des.
NOV. 6-7-
E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.,
All du Pont Labs.-N.Y., N.J.. Penna.,
Delaware, Md., Va., N. Car.. S. Car.,
Tenn., Ky., Ohio & Texas-PhD: ChE,
EM, IE, Instru., Matls., ME, Met. &
Nuclear. Men & Women. R. & D.
NOV. 6-
Goodyear Aircraft Corp., Akron, Ohio
& Phoenix, Ariz.-All Degrees: AE &
Astro., BE. BS-MS: ME. MS: Commun.
Sci. BS: E Physics. Feb. & June grads.
Men & Women. R. & D., Des.
W. R. Grace & Co., Dewey & Almy
Chem. Div., Cambridge, Acton,. & Adams,
Mass., Chicago, Ill.. Montreal, Canada,
Owensboro, Ky., Quakertown. Pa., San
Leandro, Calif., Taunton, Mass.-BS-MS:
ChE & ME. Feb. & June grads. R. &
D., Des., Prod., Sales, Prod. Dev., Pr*o-
ess Dev., Process Engrg., Project Eng.,
Mfg. Eng.
The Mead Corp., Entire Corp.-BS-
MS: ChE. ES: BE, IE & ME. Feb. grads.
R. & D., Prod.
Univ. of Mich. Institute of science &
Tech-All Degrees: EB, EM, Instru. &
Physics. BS: E Math, E Physics & Sci.
Engrg. Men & Women. R. & D.
Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp., See
Bulletin Boaris for locations & types
of jobs available-BS-MS: ChE, BE, IE,
(Continued on Page 5)

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students. -
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTISTa
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Class on Christian Ethics.
11 :00 a.m. Morning Worship.
SUNDAY EVENING
6:45 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship, "This I Believe, Part I1."
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
John G. Malcin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Ray and Nancy McNair, House Directors

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00,.8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.-
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and1
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Doily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8:0.. Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate
SUNDAY

Cr) E

*~AB BA li

r
1

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stonebrunner, Campus Ministers.
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - Morning Worship.
"Beyond Casualness to Christian Steward-
ship," sermon by Dr. Rupert.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar, Pine Room. Series sub-
ject, "Encounters with Other Living Relig-
ions." Topic, "The Religions of India,
Buddhism."
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. Topic: "The Crux of Racial
Justice," Dr. JameshMorgan assisted by
Henry Wallace.
MONDAY
8:00-11:00 p.m. OPEN HOUSE, Jean Robe's
apartment.
TUESDAY
12:00 Noon-Student Cabinet luncheon, Pine
Room.
5:15-7:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations,
Green Room. Discussion of Lecture by Mar-
tin Luther King.
7:30 p.m.-Non-Credit Course in Religion.
"Old Testament" by Tony Stoneburner,
Wesley Lounge.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in the Pine Room. Out
in time for 8 o'clocks.
4:00 p.m.-Coffee Hour, Wesley Lounge
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Grad Supper, Pine Room.
THURSDAY
7:00 p.m.--Kappa Phi Pledge meeting, Youth
Room.
7:30 p.m. - Kappa Phi Initiation, Green
Room.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
SUNDAY
Worship Services at 9:45 and 11:15. Sermon
Topic: "Both Faith and Works."
Bible Classes at 9:45 and 11:15.
Gamma Delta Supper and Program at 6 p.m.:
INTERNATIONAL NIGHT with the Rev.
Clement Lee speaking on the topic: "The
Potency of the Church."
Wednesday: Midweek Devotions at 10 p.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY--

9:30 a.m. Worship Service and
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
1 1:00 a.m. Worship Service.

Communion.,

Experience . ..ability

12 consecutive years it
House of Representatives.

n

the U. S

..omm.....

Distinguished service on the Judi-
ciary Committee (Anti-Trust Sub-
committee) and the Government Op-
erations Committee (Foreign Oper-
ations Subcommittee).
A crusader for open government,
Clark R. Mollenhoff, winner of the
Pulitzer Prize for National Report-
ing and author of the recent book,
"WASHINGTON COVER-UP," said
about Congressman Meader: "He
has been one of the most consistent
and informed fighters against the
arbitrary Washington Cover-up."

7:00 p.m. Martin Luthern Film.
Wednesday-7:15-7:45 p.m. Midweek Devo-
tions.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "The Chal-
lenge of Stwardship," Laymen sermons.
Bible lecture, 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL: crib through 9th grade,
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, 7:30 a.m. Sunday.
Telephone 2-5189 for weekly, activities.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Washtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon topic for Sunday, Nov. 4, will be:
"Faith: A New Interpretation."

1

Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Presents

Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.

11

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