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November 03, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-03

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAIL.V

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'IU~llAS, NOVEMBERK 3, 1962

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ECKSTEIN COMMENTS:
War May Alter Indian Policy

Candidates
Bach Plans
For Peace

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By THOMAS DRAPER

V

"War with Red China may well
be a turning point in Indian his-
tory," Prof. Alexander Eckstein of
the economics department said re-
cently.
Red China's attack caught India
off guard militarily, economically
and ideologically. The war "will
force Indian policy makers and in-
tellectuals to reconsider align-
ments, attitudes, and their whole
self-image," Eckstein continued.
This self-image fulfills the
Ghandian philosophy of non-vio-
lence and neutralism, he said. In-
dia has pursued a policy of friend-
ship with the West, Red China and
Russia, and feels that all are re-
sponsible for the cold war.
Now, China is attacking, India's
northern border, Russia is support-
ing the Chinese claims, and the
United States and Great Britain
are speeding arms to the Indian
forces.
Surprise War
The war has taken India by sur-
prise. Prof. Antonin Basch of the
economics department s a i d,
"Former Defense Minister Krishna
Menon did not believe that Red
China would attack India."
The Chinese are advancing
through mountainous areas from
which India has never before been
attacked.
Winter will soon r $ake major
offensive impossible, but if fight-
ing spreads in the spring a change
in Indian'defense policy may be
necessary. India has signed no
military pacts, and has bought all
its weapons. To arm adequately
by next spring will be economically
impossible.
Give Arms
"We will probably give them
arms," Prof. Robert M. Stearn of
the economics department said.
He added that India does not
have currency available to buy
enough weapons for a large-scale
war. "She may be forced into ac-
cepting weapons in grants. This
may drive India closer to us."
"The Indians didn't have a

sense of urgency in their attitude
toward development," Prof. Eck-
stein commented. They knew that
China was outpacing them but
they didn't realize the policy and
program ramifications. They felt
that as long as they maintained a
peace posture China would recip-
rocate.
Defense Stressed
"The war should affect the com-
position of plans," Prof. Eckstein
said. There will probably be a
great deal more emphasis on de-
fense and heavy industry.
"The long run effects of war on
the Indian economy depends upon
the size of the war," Prof. Eck-
stein said. The United States and

Britain are pre'pared to render aid,
but Indians are anxious not to
become dependent on the West.
Resources for defense could be,
mobilized through taxes, dona-
tions, or bonds.
"Development of military pro-
duction does not promote eco-
nomic growth," Prof. Stearn said.
He added that there must be a
change in the internal economy
to adjust to the war. The war
drive could bring about more effi-
cient use of resou ces and better
taxation.
Prof. Basch pointed out that
the planned Indian economy could
be easily transformed into a reg-
imented war economy.

School Services Bureau
Rates SecondaryUnits

By ANN NEUBERGER
One of the unique features of
the University is the Bureau of
School Services which accredits
secondary schools and gives aid to
Michigan school systems.
Wlien the bureau was set up un-
der Acting University President
Henry Simmons Frieze in 1871, its
main purpose was to set the stand-
ards for Michigan high school
graduates, entering the Univer-
sity without taking exams.
In 1871 five Michigan high
schools became the first/second-
ary schools in this country to re-
ceive any kind of accredation. As
more schools took advantage of
this opportunity here, other state
school systems developed a sim-
ilar policy.
NCA Standards
The University still gives ratings
to schools, but, in order to receive
long-term accredation, schools
must meet the standards of the
North Central Association.
The bureau's second important
function is giving consultation
services to Michigan school sys-
tems. This involves the answering

of questions from local school
boards concerning their own prob-'
lems. The bureau draws experts
from the whole University to solve
the problems.
Most questions can be answered
by a one day visit to the school in
question. It may involve a discus-
sion with a member of the archi-
tecture college on the cost of re-
modeling a school or a thorough
examination of the plans for a
new school by someone in the en-
gineering college.
Michigan is one of the few states
that has such a consultation body
within its state university.
Three Groups
The bureau's services are di-
vided into three groups: consul-
tation services, special services,
which deals with questions which
come up often, such as libraries,
plant planning and accredation,
and liaison services, consisting of
the state and regional groups with
which the bureau works.
Bureau Director Kent W. Leach,
commenting on some of the future
plans of his office, said there are
hopes of setting up a national
processing center which would
contain information on all the
schools in the United States. It
would also make up schedules for
every high school. This could be
done through the use of IBM
machines.
The bureau also hopes to in-
crease the awareness of the people
about research projects being done
in the field of education.

HAYES AND EVANS-Next Thursday night Helen Hayes and
Maurice Evans will bring a unique presentation of Shakespeare
to Hill aud. with "A Program for Two Players." The production
will include excerpts from 17 Shakespearean dramas.
FamnousPair To Present
Evening of Shakespeare

Helen Hayes and Maurice Evans,
making their first appearance to-
gether in 20 years, will bring their
evening of Shakespeare to Ann Ar-
bor Thursday in Hill Aud. under
the auspices of the Professional
Theatre Program.
The two-star attraction, called
"A Program for Two Players," is
a unique showcase encompassing
17 different plays and comedies by
Shakespeare. One of the highlights
comes when Evans plays all of the
clowns from "A Midsummer
Night's Dream." One of Miss Hayes
featured scenes is her Rosalind in
"As You Like It."
This summer, at the American
Shakespeare Festival in Stratford,
Conn., the program was the hit of
the season, playing to capacity
crowds and receiving rave notices.
During the last year Miss Hayes
Four 'U' Debaters
Enter Competition
Four members of the University
varsity debate squad will com-
pete in the annual Yearling De-
bate Tournament on November 3
at the University of Wisconsin.

has been representing American
cultural forces overseas. She head-
ed the state department's tour of
the American Repertory Company
which played all over Europe and
South America with "The Glass
Menagerie," "The Skin of Our
Teeth" and "The Miracle Worker."
In 1940 Miss Hayes and Evans
appeared together for the Theatre
Guild production of "Twelfth
Night," directed by Margaret Web-
ster, which ran for two years.
Board To "Ask'
New Outlays
The Board of Control of Michi-
gan Tech College in Houghton has
approved a preliminary budget re-
quest to the state Legislature of
$5.6 million in operational funds
and $3.7 million in capital outlay
funds for the fiscal year 1963-
64.
This request represents an in-
crease of 36 per cent over the ac-
tual budget for 1962-63. The extra
funds are primarily intended for
higher faculty salaries and pur-
chases of badly-needed equipment.

By MARTHA MacNEAL
The coming congressional elec-
tions, coupled with the questions
of Communism and nuclear war,
have brought intonbeinga signifi-
cant group of candidates - those
who support liberal programs for
world peace.
There are approximately 40 such
peace candidates across the nation,
mostly of Republican, Democratic
and independent political shades.
Ann Arbor's Democratic candidate
for the House seat for the second
district, Tom Payne, calls for the
reduction of the arms race and
the initiation of a peace race, as
do most of the others.
Payne feels that a peace race
would allow the United States to
utilize constructively that portion
of the economy which is lying
stagnant. He maintains that the
arms race, which takes up such a
large portion of government spend-
ing, is useless for all practical pur-
poses, and certainly not produc-
tive.
Underdeveloped Nations
According to Payne,the econo-
my could be more meaningfully
turned toward building up under-
developed countries and underde-
veloped areas in the United States.
In this way, he believes American
economic resources could be used
to eliminate unemployment.
The peace race would supplant
the arms race. He intends to run
again in 1964, and if he does well
in this election against Republi-
can incumbent George Meader, the
Democrats will probably continue
to support him;
Among the other candidates,
many sponsored by the Council for
Abolishing War and the Committee
of 1,000 to Elect Peace Candidates,
is independent Prof. H. Stuart
Hughes of the history department
at Harvard from Massachusetts,
who admits he is a "sure loser."
He has joined the race to get
publicity for his ideas, and in an
attempt to force the other candi-
dates to "face the issues."
Many Running
Other peace candidates include
John O'Connel, George Brown, and
Knox Mellon, California Demo-
crats; William Hefner, Massachu-
setts Democrat; Jerome Ziegler, Il-
linois Democrat; Alice Bryant,
Washington Democrat; Caroline
Tamsey, Maryland Republican;
and Robert Cosby, Alva Tompkins,
and Sidney Lens, Chicago inde-
pendents.
However, some observers expect
that the peace candidates have lost
ground because of President John
F. Kennedy's recent action in the
Cuban crisis. Some of the candi-
dates themselves admit that this
may be the case, but they have
not altered their views.
Students Give
Tlurish Ball
The Turkish Ball, sponsored by
the Turkish Student Association,
will be held from 8:30 p.m. to 1
a.m. tonight in the ballroom of
the VFW.
Tickets are still available at
the international Center, or they
may be purchased at the door.
Music for the affair will be pro-
vided by a Turkish orchestra, and
dress is semi-formal.
The Turkish Ball is an annual
affair and last year was received
with enthusiasm by those who par-
ticipated in its festivities. It was
held in the VFW building last year
also.

Continuous
From 1 P.M.
TODAY

e

DIAL
8-6416

-I-HELD OVER
SECOND BIG WEEK
IdII11III B I . 1lj11 n~iufI rlk Winner of 10
DIAL 2-6264 iilumlll uUi academy A wards!
"BEST
PICTURE OF THE YEAR I
ANEW YORK FILM CRITICS' AWARD
"WEST SIDE STORY' IS A CIN-
EMA MASTERPIECE! THE PER-
FORMANCES ARE TERRIFIC!"
- Bosley Crowther, New York Times
Schedule of Performances
Mon.-Tues.-Wed.-Thurs.
at 2 and 8 p.m.
Fri.-Sat.-Sun. at 2,
6:45, 9:25 p.m.
Weekday Matinee 90c
Nights and Sunday $1.25
Children All Times 50c

NOW eL1LAIIedXJ
"An excellent suspense drama !"

DIAL
5-6290
-FREE PRESS

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4'f'
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Kx.

20-40% DISCOUNT FOR APA SEASON MEMBERS
Hill Auditorium Box Office Open Today 10 A.M. - 1 P.M.

The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the University of
Michigan for which The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564
Administration Building before 2
p.m. two days preceding publication.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Day Calendar

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I

YOU!t Are Invited
1962
TURKISH BALIL
SEMI-FORMAL
World-Famous Surprise Guest Star
PLUS Dance of the Seven Veils
Nov. 3-Sat.-8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.-V.F.W.

9:30 a.m.-Eighth Triennial Medical
Center Alumni Conference-
Ralph A. Sawyer, "Progress
of Michigan": Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
1:30 p.m.-Football-U-M vs. Wisconsin:
Stadium.
6:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Professional Theatre
Program-Association of Pro-
ducing Artists in "A Penny
for a Song": Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild - Ed-
mond O'Brien and Michael
Redgrave in George Orwell's
"1984"; short, Mack Sennett's
"Half Back of Notre Dame":
Architecture -Aud.
7:00 and 9:30 p.m.-A n n u a 1 Combined
Men's Glee Club Concert -
Univ. ofMich. and Univ. of
Wisconsin: Hill Aud.
8:00 p.m.-University Players - "The

Servant of Two Masters" by
Carlo Goldoni: Trueblood
Aud., Frieze Bldg.
General Notices
Faculty Meeting: College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts will be held on
Mon., Nov. 5, at 4:10 p.m. in Angell
Hall, Aud. A.
The Women's Research Club will meet
Mon., Nov. 5, at 8 p.m. in the West Con-
ference Room, Rackham Bldg. Dr. Mar-
garet Ogden will speak on "Guy de
Chauliac's 'Chirurgia Magna': A Middle
English Translation."
Events
Student Government Council Approval
for the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Baha'i Student Group, Lecture, Nov.
8, 8:00 p.m., Aud. A.
Baha'i Student Group, Literature Dis-
play, Nov. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 8:00 a.m.-5:00
p.m., Fishbowl.
University of Michigan Union, SGC
Debate on USNSA, Nov. 11, 2:00 p.m.,
Multi-Purpose Room, UGLI.
Dept. of Engrg. Mechanics Seminar:
Mon., Nov. 5, 4:00 p.m., Rm. 325 W.
Engrg. Bldg. (Note change in room).
Prof. Chia-Shun Yih, Dept. of Engrg.
Mechanics, The Univ. of Mich., will
speak on "The Velocity of Fluid Masses
in Porous Media."
Coffee will be served at 3:30 p.m. in
the Faculty Lounge.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Armstrong, Lancaster, Pa. -Many &
various openings including the follow-
ing: Non-Tech.-Sales, Accounting, Pub-

lie Rels., Credit Mgmt., Personnel, Prod.
Plan., Purchasing, etc. Tech.-Engrg.,
Chem., Indust. & Chem. Engnrs.
City of Jackson, Mich. - 1) Senior
Planners-MS in Urban Plann'ing or re-
lated field & 1 yr. exper. 2) Cartographer
& Planning Analyst-MS in Urban Plan-
ning, urban geog., or related field. 3)
Junior Planners-BS in Urban Planning
or related field.
New York Air Brake Co., Watertown
Div., Watertown, N.Y.-Assistant Super-
(Continued on Page 3)
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Baha'i Student Group, Open House,
Nov. 4, 3-5 p.m., 310 E. William.
Congregational Disciples E & R Guild,
Seminar: History of Christian Thought:
Apostolic Fathers: Clement, Ignatius,
Tertullian. Rev. J. E. Edwards, 9:30-10:30
a.m.; "Does 'Faith in Christ' Have Per-
tinence to Academic Inquiry?", Rev. R.
Fuller, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 4, 802 Monroe.
Newman Club, Wisconsin Dunkers'
Hour, After Game; Movie: "Run Silent,
Run Deep," 8 p.m.; Nov. 3, 331 Thomp-
son.
Unitarian Student Group, Meeting,
Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m., 1st Unitarian Church.
Speaker: Dr. M. Gold, "Undetected Ju-
venile Delinquency."
India Students Assoc., Tickets for the
Deepavali Banquet on Nov. 10 can be
bought by calling Jagdish Chandra,
treasurer, at NO 2-4211.
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking or
Horseback Riding, Nov. 4, 2 p.m., Rack-
ham Bldg., Huron St. Entrance.

DON MURRAY C R ThEK AFMAN

LAST CHANCE TO SEE THE BRILLIANT APA COMPANY
IN THE FINAL FALL FESTIVAL PLAY
THE UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
PROUDLY PRESENTS

i ._ _ ._

i

w w w w w w w w - - - a

APA
JASSOCIATION OF PRODUCIN6'ART1STSI
IN THE

'

S.G.C.
TONIGHT and Sunday at 7 and 9
Special Post Halloween Program
JEAN VIGO'S
ZERO FOR CONDUCT
Masterpiece of a rebellion in a French
boy's school. An uncensored version,
with guaranteed clear new prints.
plus

If you seek the UNUSUAL
in campus entertainment

A PENNY
FOR A SONG'

SEE THE
MICHIGAN-WISCONSIN
JOINT MEN'S GLEE CLUB CONCERT
on stage in Hill Auditorium

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