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November 01, 1962 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-01

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TMTRSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGETIMER

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 1. 196~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Tell Defense Officials
To Report to Superiors
After Talking to Press

STUDIES VOTING: -
De Gaulle To Remain
As French President
PARIS (P) - President Charles de Gaulle yesterday called the
results of Sunday's referendum satisfactory - apparently showing
that he has no present intention of quitting.
During the referendum campaign, de Gaulle pleaded for a big
"yes" vote for his proposal to elect his successors by universal suffrage.
He said he could not carry on if the results were "weak, mediocre, or
doubtful." At the cabinet meeting, he apparently made no reference
to his threat to step aside. A com-
munique on the deliberations said
Claim s W aste de Gaulle "underlined the great
significance of the positive re-
1711 sponse given by the nation to the
InP question that was posed."

Of Advent'

WASHINGTON (P) - A House
committee charged yesterday that
although $170 million has been
spent on the military's advent
communications project "the na-
tion has very little to show for it."
The committee said interservice
friction between the Army and
Air Force was at least partly re-
sponsible.
"If the advent program is not a
good example of interservice ri-
valry, it is certainly a poor ex-
ample of effective interservice co-
operation," the report of the House
Space Committee said..
Advent was conceived in 1958 as
a worldwide jam-proof military
communications system.
But it was: scrapped this year
and split into two projects under
the same name - (1) development
of a new 500-pound package using
the most recent technology and
(2) development of an interim
communications s y s t e m using
many medium altitude relay satel-
lites.
Born in 1958
The report said "the original
estimates of the total costs of the,
Advent.. research and. development
program were $140 million. By the
time the project was canceled, well
over $170 million had been spent,
much of which has been written
off as an unrecoverable loss. The
total ;cost to completion, if the
project had been allowed to pro-
ceed as planned . . . would ap-
proach $350 million."
Group Started
"These are startling figures,"
the report added.
Moreover, the committee said it
had serious reservations about the
"reoriented" Advent program. It
said an interim system using an
estimated 24 to 36 medium alti-
tude satellites, and requiring com-
plex ground installations, would
be extremely expensive.

Voters approved the direct elec-
tion proposal with a 62 per cent
"yes" answer. Counting stay-at-
homes and "no" votes however,
onlyaboutd47 per cent of the total
number of registered voters lined
up behind de Gaulle's plan.
The communique indicated that
de Gaulle had focused on the "yes"n
vote and expressed the opinion
that "a large majority is resolute-
ly turned toward the political ren-
ovation of the nation, a necessary
condition for the progress and
prestige of France.

Must Reveal
Main Content
Of Interview
Move Said Necessary
For Pentagon 'Voice'
WASHINGTON (/P) - A written
directive to the Pentagon's mili-
tary and civilian personnel to re-
port to public information officials
what they tell newsmen in inter-
views caused considerable conster-
nation yesterday.
The memorandum, addressed to
defense department personnel, was
issued by Arthur Sylvester, assist-
ant secretary of defense in charge
of public affairs.
It instructed all personnel to re-
port to him or other "appropriate
public information offices" at the
close of each day the substance of
each interview or telephone con-
versation held with a newsman.
Another Provision
If a representative of the de-
partment's public information of-
fice was present during the inter-
view, no report would be needed,
Sylvester's memorandum said.
Reporters covering the Pentagon
already were incensed in the be-
lief that'news on the ship blockade
and aerial surveillance of Cuba
was withheld in some instances.
They also recalled that Sylves-
ter had acknowledged there was
administration control of the flow
and type of news.
Administration Unity
Sylvester said this had enabled
the government to "speak with one
voice" during the Cuban crisis.
The Sylvester memorandum, in
addition to saying that the current
world situation had placed addi-
tional responsibilities on the pub-
lic information officers to avoid
disclosure of things that might af-
fect national security, also said
that it is important to disclose all
information which' can be re-
leased appropriately to the public.
*A spokesman said the policy is
only a "formalization in writing
of a rather informal procedure"
that has been followed in the
McNamara administration.

SOLVING PROBLEMS:
Romney Explams
'New Team' Plans
Republican gubernatorial candidate George Romney stressed
putting a new team into office in a talk to Washtenaw County voters
yesterday morning.
This new team is needed to attack the problems of Michigan in
education, taxes and the domination of special interest groups. "Any-
one who refuses to recognize that Michigan has problems either has
his head in the sand or is acting.}
politically," he said..
Non-Partisan Vehicle
The state is slipping. If Michi-
gan had kept pace with the growth
of other states in the last 11 years
there would be 750 more dollars 1
in every family's income. He+
stressed the role of the Republican
party as the vehicle for non-par-
tisan leadership which could elim-
inate the influence of special in-
terest government.
That a non-partisan answer to
state problems can be found is
exemplified by the unanimous dec-
larations of the Citizen's advisory
Committee on Education in De-
troit, which Romney chaired....
Fiscal reform in spending as well <
as in taxes is necessary for a re-GEREOM Y
vitalized economy. In tax reform GEORGE ROMNEY
the job creators must be treated . . . speaks in Ann Arbor
equally with the unions, he said.

Jobless Rate
Drops Off
In October
WASHINGTON (A) - The na-
tion's job situation improved mod-
erately in October, shoving un-
employment down to a three-year
low.
The Labor Department an-
nounced that employment rose
seasonally by 225,000 to 68,893,000,
a record for October. The jobless
total declined by 218,000, more
than expected, to 3,294,000.
These improvements brought
the nation's idle rate, seasonally
adjusted, down to 5.5 per cent of
the work force. This is about
where the rate has been for some
time, except for a temporary rise
to 5.8 per cent in August and
September.
The job markets usually make
their best statistical showing ev-
ery year in October. If the present
5.5 per cent idle rate continues,
unemployment will climb to about
4.5 million in mid-winter.
Compared with a year ago em-
ployment is up by about 1.25 mil-
lion while unemployment is down
by 640,000.

EXPERT ON FRAUD:
Abrams To Study
Election in Detroit
By The Associated Press
DETROIT -A nationally-recognized expert on election frauds
has obtained clearance from the Detroit Election Commission to con-
duct "challenges" of voters at the booths next week.
George Abrams, who is backed by a committee of leading Detroit
citizens, 20 volunteer lawyers and a trained staff of 15 special investi-
gators, has also asked the city police for a guarantee that his chal-

lengers will not be roughed up at-
the polls.
Abrams is operating under a
barrage of charges from state
Democrats including "intimida-
tion of Negroes" and "vote-lynch-
ing." At the same time, he re-
ceives a telephone tip every five
or 10 minutes with a name. of a
dead or departed voter to watch
out for.
He claims to have a list of scores
of potential vote frauds including:
"One voter registered under three
different names; election workers
in the habit of going into booths
to 'help' trusting voters; a woman
born in Canada who has been vot-
ing in Detroit since 1956 without
citizenship."
In denouncing his effort, Gov.
John B. Swainson recently de-
clared, "There is no fraud in any
Michigan election; this is a sneaky
affair."
Swainson agrees to only one
point Abrams raises: urban renew-
al, slum clearance and expressway
construction have displaced many
voters in Michigan cities whose
naries are still on the registra-
tion rolls.
Abrams claims this may result
in as many as 150,000 "deadwood"
names on the Wayne County rolls.

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Sandy Democrats
Romney charged Gov. John B.
Swainson with never presenting a
good tax reform program and said
that the Democratic party had
been built on the "sandy bottom
of a coalition of special interest
groups," as opposed to the new
broad-based citizen outlook of the
Republican party.
Romney also supported Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy's action in
Cuba and called for continued
freedom of the Western hemis-
phere from Soviet influence.
Ask .Revision
for Colonies
LISBON (W)-The government's
overseas council voted yesterday
to give territories, abroad more
voice in administrative affairs and
a greater measure of self rule.
This would affect mainly MoA-
ambique in East Africa and An-
gola in West Africa. Their repre-
sentatives at a two-week council
meeting insisted upon a decent-
ralization of administration. It
now is entirely in the hands of the
government in Lisbon.
If the plan approved by the
council is passed by Portugal's
National Assembly, many func-
tions of the overseas ministry in
matters of localadministration
will be transferred to the terr-
tories.

world News Roundup
By The Associated Press
DAMASCUS-Yemen's Republican regime has threatened to
invade Saudi Arabia. The threat was attributed by the United Arab
Republic Radio to Yemen's Republican Deputy Premier and Deputy
Army Commander Abdul Rahman Baidyani.
* * *
OTTAWA-Liberal Leader Lester B. Pearson last night proposed
a meeting of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Warsaw

ownewommommommow

Pact powers to seek a further
easing of East-West tensions.
Pearson also said the time has
come for NATO and for Canada
as a member, to re-examine their
whole defense- stategy, and per-
haps bring the two "more closely
together."

C'i

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY
An Agency Representative will interview undergraduate Seniors and
graduate students for June and August 1963 employment by our
Agency during the dates of November 6th through the 9th, 1962, on
Campus. Please consult the Bureau of Appointments and Occupational
Information, 3200 Student Activities Building for information con-
cerning the types of positions available and to schedule an appoint-
ment. A review of the information on file with the Bureau of Appoint-
ments is an essential requisite prior to scheduling an appointment for
interview.

Thurs., Nov. 8-8:30 p.m.
Hill Auditorium
CHOICE SEATS
STILL AVAILABLE
Orch. $4.50, 4.00, 350
1st Balc. $3.50, 3.00, 2.50
2nd BaIc. $2.50, .200, 1.50
20-40% DISCOUNT
for APA Season Members
Box Office Hrs: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
MAIL ORDERS FILLED ALSO
Please enclose a stamped
self-addressed envelope.

SAULT STE. MARIE - Ribbon
cutting ceremonies yesterday offi-
cially opened the international
bridge linking the American and
Canadian Soos.
* *, *
UNITED NATIONS-The Unit-
ed Nations General Assembly vot-
ed overwhelmingly last night to
demand annulment of Southern
Rhodesia's constitution on grounds
that it discriminated against
Africans.
* * *
NEW YORK-The Stock Market
rounded out its second day of
majoradvance yesterday, although
trading declined late in the day.

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CHARLES DE GAULLE
... he'll stick around

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The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the University of
Michigan for which The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564

Administration Building before 2
p.m. two days preceding publication.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Day Calendar

concert has started, if you do not wish
to stay.
Educational Sociology A330 field trip
will be held Thurs., Nov. 1, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m.

The.Mary Louisa Hinsdale Scholarship
amounting to $195.53 (interest on the
endowment fund) is available to un-
dergrad single women who are wholly
or partially self-supporting and who do
not live in Univ. residence halls or
sorority houses. Girls with better than
averagescholarship and need will be
considered.
The Lucile B. Conger Scholarship is
offered to undergrad women on the
basis of academic performance, contri-
bution to Univ. life and financial need;
the stipend is variable.
a r *

ATTENTION STUDENTS''
WOLVERINE CLUB is providing
AIR FLIGHTS to NEW YORK
THANKSGIVING ...... Nov. 21 with return Nov. 25
CHRSTA....... ... Dec. 20 with return Jan. 2
Lv Willow Run 5:30 p.m.
Lv Idlewild 7:00 p.m.
First Class Non-Stop DC-7 Willow Run to Idlewild
Excellent Dinner served each way
Special Buses from Union to Willow Run meeting
both going and return flights included in fare.
All Transportation Taxes.
$4800 is the Total Cost
Call NO 5-9250 for further information
9 A.M. to 5:30 daily and 9:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. Saturdays

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LAST-MINUTE
TICKET-BUYER
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LAST MINUTE
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MICHIGAN -WISCONSIN
JOINT MEN'S GLEE CLUB CONCERT

II

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