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November 01, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURS

DAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1962

AT VIW)

I

NV EW ADDIT ION:
'U' Center To Study Population

By STEVEN HALLER
A comparatively recent addition
to the "Research Center of the
Midwest" is the University Popu-
lation Studies Center, organized
in June of- 1961.
The Center, one of three major
institutions of this kind in the
United States, was made possible
through a grant of $500,000 from

Ford
Prof.

Foundation, according to
Ronald Freedman of the so-

ciology department. Indeed the
majority of the Population Studies
Center staff*is from the sociology
department, but Prof. Freedman
hastens to point outthat the Cen-
ter is not solely for that depart-
ment's use.

MUSKET Director To Try
Yew Theatrical Techniques

BY BURTON MICHAELS

4.

"A new concept of theatre,
attempting the tightest blend pos-
sible between music, drama and
dance" willhighlight 'Bartholo-
mew Tair,' this year's MUSKET
presentation, author and director,
Jack O'Brien, Grad, says. -
The show's most striking inno-
vation is its staging. The curtain
falls only at intermission. Dancers
miove the fair's booths to create
all other scene changes, so "scenes
flow through music and color."
Uniqueness : also describes the
music, composed and orchestrated
by Robert=James, Grad. "The con-
temporary score is identifiable
with American popular music,"
O'Brien says.
Two Orchestras
Two antiphonal orchestras, one
in the pit and one behind the
stage, andbetween the "lyric songs
of the aristocrats", and the "folk
overtones of the rabble," distin-
guish the "diametrically opposed
elements of the chorus, which is
an integral_ unit with textures of
its own; ' he adds.
The story, based on Ben Jon-
son's comedy of 1614, also exhibits
a fresh approach. "We have trans-
cribed the work without sacrific-
ing Jonson's pace, style, or charm.
The show is not modernized; its
traditional feeling approximates
the Elizabethan theatre.
"But once the topical refer-
ences are removed, the characters
become as vibrant as ever,"
O'Brien says.
Previous History
'Bartholomew Fair' is O'Brien
and James' second MUSKET pro-
duction. 'Land, Ho,' which they
presented last year, won the $1500
Broadcasting Music Inc. award for
the year's best college musical.
Before 'L a n d Ho,' MUSKET
staged Broadway hits, beginning
with 'Brigadoon' in 1956, then
continuing with 'Kiss Me Kate,'

'Oklahoma,' 'Carousel,' and 'Kis-
met.'
Unlike its predecessor, the Mich-
igan Union Opera, an all-male
touring company of the '30's andj
early '40's, MUSKET has realized
profits which last year totalled
$1,000. In control of the organiza-
tion is the Koed Committee, sub-
committee of the Union Student
Activities Committee.
Koed Committee approves the
selection of the show, the general
chairman, the director, and the
budget, which this year amounts
to $6000. Harry Taxin, '64E, serves
as both MUSKET General Chair-
man and chairman of Koed Com-
mittee.
MUSKET will be presented in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Nov. 28-Dec. 1.
To .Dedicate
Kitt Telescope
For McMath
The world's largest solar tele-
scope, named in memory of Prof.
Robert R. McMath of the astrono-
my department, will be dedicated
Nov. 2 at Kitt Peak National Ob-
servatory near Tucson, Ariz.
The solar telescope is a major
part of the new national labora-
tory operated for the National
Science Foundation by the Associ-
ation of Universities for Research
in Astronomy, Inc. Prof. McMath,
who died on Jan. 2, 1962, was a
former chairman of the board of
AURA.
The new instrument has a 300-
foot focal length-twice that of
any previous solar telescope-and
an aperture of 60 inches. It is
expected that for the first time
the true physical properties of
small-scale structures on the sun
can be determined with it.

The work of the Population
Studies Center entailshthe con-
ducting of research in the popula-
tion field and the training of stu-
dents by involving them in such
research.
Data Collection
Under the former heading come
the collection, analysis, and inter-
pretation of population data. Data
for foreign countries as well as for
the United States are examined;
and, insofar as possible, changes
through time are investigated.
,Each of the population studies
centers situated on campuses
throughout the country has a
somewhat distinctive approach to
the research at hand, reflecting
both the interests of its staff and
its tradition' of research and
training. At the University, popu-
lation problems tend to be formu-
lated and interpreted within a so-
cial or an ecological framework.
There is also emphasis on the
development and use of field re-
search skills, especially those re-
quired for sample surveys, in ad-
dition to the techniques of formal
demographic analysis (statistical
studies of populations).
Research Opportunity
Since formal instruction in pop-
ulation studies for academic credit
continue to be offered by the so-
ciology department, the Center it-
self offers no such curricula. Rath-
er, it provides a setting in which
faculty members and other senior
staff can conduct research and
train students through their su-
pervised participation in research
projects.
Research studies currently be-
ing carried on at the Population
Studies Center have been grouped
into four major areas of interest:
population distribution and mi-
gration, social correlates of human
fertility, community organization
and population and public policy.
The Center has a special inter-
est in developing the resources of
foreign areas for conducting popu-
lation studies. This involves the
training of students from outside
the United States, the assistance
of established investigators from
the lands to be studied (insofar as
suitable arrangements can be
made), and the investigation of
population problems here and
elsewhere to provide baselines for
future investigations.
Research Grants
In addition to its research work,
the Center yearly awards a limit-
ed number of scholarships, fellow-
ships, and research internships to
graduate students with an interest
in population studies. Further-
more, a limited number of travel
grants are made available to stu-
dents from outside the United
States to cover transportation
costs to and from Ann Arbor.
Travel grants for American stu-
dents planning field work abroad
in this field are also possible.
Gray Reviews
School Needs
YPSILANTI - Charles F. Gray
of Ypsilanti, Democratic candi-
date for representative from the
Second District, cited three prob-
lems facing the state in the field
of education in a debate Friday,
at Eastern Michigan University.
Gray noted the need for an ex-
panded building program for
classrooms, a means of increasing
teacher salaries to attract new and
qualified teachers as well as those
already in the field, and an easing
of tax burdens of property owners.
To combat these problems, Gray
recommended an increase of eight
per cent in state aid to school dis-
tricts, and to combat similar prob-
lems facing state-supported col-
leges and universities, an increase
of $10 million from the general
fund.

THE CUPOLA
.. . a light in the window

Month Ends
For Cupola

In case you weren't aware
and about 186 million people
this country alone were not
October was Cupola Month.

In

Among the many practical fea-
tures of the cupola are ventilation
and beauty. At the Student Pub-
lications Bldg., a small dingy cup-
ola sits atop the Gothic splendor
which .houses various periodicals
and The Michigan Daily.
Members of The Daily have
found their own peculiar uses for
this particular cupola, which it-
self is knighted by a now defunct,
but usually shining red light. Pri-
marily the cupola is the spot where
all Daily senior editors carve their
signatures.
It overlooks the campus, as far
as the Stadium, providing a source
of solace and peace from the nor-
mal chaos of the lower portion of
the edifice.
However, it has been cited as a
potential hazard for low-flying
planes and pregnant pigeons.
TIJBP Reveals
Pledge Class
Tau Beta Pi engineering fra-
ternity announced the following
fall pledge class Wednesday:
Richard E. Adams. '64; James M.
Amend, '64; Robert W. Anthony, '64;
James P. Baker, '63; Roger A. Bennett,
'63; Jeffrey W. Berno, '63; Louis W.
Bloch, '63; Bruce william Bradshaw,
'63; Shiu-Chu Chiu, '63; Kenneth J.
Coeling, '63.
William N. Delgass, '64; Richard A.
Eberhard, '64; David W. Fischer, '64;
Robert F. Forche, '63; Paris Genalis, '64;
James G. Haidt, '63; John F. Hamma,
'63; Laverne L. Hoag, '63; David A.
Hubbard, '63; Hale W. Huber, '63; A.
Jerome Kroot, '63.
John J. Lawser, '63;Kiu Hee Lee, '63;
Harry Lenox, '63; Jorge Leon-Agusti,
'63; Sanford J. Lewis, '64; Robert L.
Lillie, '63; Jeffrey J. Ltt, '63: Robert B.
Macklin, '64; Hazim Mat, '63; Gary P.
McCarbery, '63; William A. Millard, '63;
Robert L. Moore, Jr., '64; Willard L.
Myers, '63.
Michael A. O'Neil, '63; Lee J. Oven-
shire, '63; Marvin L. Overway, '63;
Thomas H. Palmer, '63; David L. Paul,
'63; Arnold Revzin, '64; Paul G. Rie-
wald, '64; V. Karlis Riters, '63; Roger
K. Route, '64; Sheldon M. Rubin, '64.
Phillip J. Salsbury, '64; Ole N. San-
dnes, '63; Joseph A. Sarnowski,'63:Rob-
ert W. Shultz, '63; Benson P. Shapiro,
'63; Thomas E. Smith, '63; Andrew J.
Snavely, Jr., '64; John H. Spriggs, '63;
Bradley Arthur Taylor, '63; Cevat Temi-
zer, '63..
Willard J. Vandenburg, '63; William P.
Vockel, '63; Gerald R. Weiss, '63; Frank-
lin J. Werner, '63; Louis C. Westphal
III, '63; Charles E. Zakrajsek, '63.
I

GordonHall
Serves 'U'
As Housing
By RONALD WILTON
To most faculty members the
Joys of country living are not ap-
pealing enough to overcome the
reluctance to live about 10 miles
from campus.
Thus it is that Gordon Hall, a
22-room mansion in Greek Re-
vival style at Dexter, owned by
the University, is now a student-
faculty residence instead of the
purely faculty residence envisioned
by the Regents when they had the
hall remodeled in 1951.
The mansion was built from
1841-43 by Judge Samuel W. Dex-
ter, who was born in Massachu-
setts in 1792, moved to Michigan
in 1824, and was prominent in
Washtenaw County history.
He was Washtenaw's first cir-
cuit judge and one of the first
Regents of the University. He was
also a publisher of "The Emi-
grant," the first newspaper in the
county, and a Unitarian minister,
serving without pay in many of
the area churches.
The mansion and the surround-
ing 70 acres were given to the Uni-
versity in 1950 by Mrs. Katherine
Dexter McCormick of Chicago,
granddaughter of the late judge.
Up to that time the house had
had a varied history. At one time
it was used as a church serving
four or five denominations at one
time, each holding services at
scheduled hours. Dexter's first post
office had also been housed with-
in its walls.
The Regents decided to remod-
el the interior of the mansion into
four apartments for faculty mem-
bers in February, 1951. Each
apartment consists of two bed-
rooms, bath, living room and
kitchenette.
The conversion of the mansion
into apartments was opposed by
many local and national historical
societies because of its history and
its architecture.
However, then University Presi-
dent Alexander Grant Ruthven
pointed out that Mrs. McCormick
had requested that the building
serve as faculty housing and that
the exterior of the house would
be preserved as it was.
Vulcans Honorary
Selects Members
V u 1 c a n s Senior Engineering
Honorary tapped the following
men last night: William Harris,
Richard Post and David Randall.
Also tapped as an honorary mem-
ber was Prof. L. J. Quackenbush
of the engineering college.
What's Cooking
Between
Doug Brown
and the Omen's
Maximilian's Band
See Friday's ad
in the Daily

and speak about the'
to interested business
leaders and alumni.
In another program,
asked departments to
professors who will be

Program Includes Seven Improvements

One of these is a move to im-
prove University relations with the
Ann Arbor community, "People
think that the University moves
through self-interest and a lack
of planning. There are concerns
such as land acquisition of local
property and community relation-
ships with students on which re-i
lations could be improved. We
want the community to recognize
that we are responsible," Radock
said.
In Different Hands
There will be a continuation of
the "Operation Michigan" pro-
grams but the major responsibil-
ity for conducting them has been'
shifted to the Alumni Association
which has been granted addi-
tional assistance and staff.
Under this grass roots program
members of the University staff
travel to different Michigan cities'
to conduct seminars, show films

(Continued from Page 1)

University
and civic
"We have
nominate
willing to

go around the state two or three
times 1 during the year and talk
about the University.
Best Ambassadors
The University Senate Public
Relations Committee, under the
leadership of Prof. Harry A.
Towsley of the Medical School,
has shown interest in this since
the best ambassadors are faculty
members committed to the quality
of the University," Radock said.
A program to form advisory
committees for specific schools
and departments is being expand-
ed. For example, the journalism
department has an advisory com-
mittee composed of publishers and
journalists from around the state
who come once or twice a year
to talk about problems in the

field and offer advice. The Law
School has a similar committee.
"We are also planning to have
small groups of selected alumni
and friends come down here for
short visits to show them various
aspects of the University," Radock
commented.
Long Time No See
"Other schools, notably Prince-
ton University, have successful-
programs of this type. Some of our
alumni have not visited the cam-
pus in 30 years and we want them
to become familiar with the Uni-
versity today."
Turning to the field of com-
munications, he noted that the
question of whether the University
should have additional radio sta-
tions is being discussed with mem-
bers of the broadcasting commit-
tee. "We are also talking about
the possibility of having an edu-
cational television station since
there is an educational channel
DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
A BRILLIANT COMEDY!"
"- Wanda Hol,
Daily News
James Robertson
Justice
-
OPENS FRIDAY'
"LA NOTTE
B RAVA"

allocated to Ann Arbor," Radock
continued.
Much attention is being given to
the whole area of University de-
velopment over the next 10 years
and "for this the Development
Council must be expanded," he
feels.
Five-Year Plan
He added that at present pre-
liminary planning is going on for
the University's 150th anniversary
celebration which will be held in
five years.
Such activities as a major fund
drive and world wide commemor-
ative programs are in the talking
stage.
DIAL 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT

1 DEED IN
T~I~N PRS1AN LUND
STARTING FRIDAY
STRAIGHT FROM
TODAY'S HEADLINES..
The true story of the
incredible '"freedom tunnel"

Tickets on Sale
For Hayes, Evans
Tickets for "A Program for Two
Players," starring Helen Hayes and
Maurice Evans, will go on sale
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday'
at Hill Aud. The production will
be presented Nov. 8 under the
Professional T h e a t r e Program
sponsorship.

I

I' I Ie

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS-DEPT. OF SPEECH
PRESENTS
CARLO GOLDON V'S
hilarious farce
The SERVANT of
TWO MASTERS.
Tonight, Fri.,, and Sat,
8:00 P.M.,_ TRUEBLOOD AUD., FRI EZE BLDG.
Tonight $1:.50-$1 .00; Fri.-Sat. $1 .75-$1 .25
Box office opens at 12:30
.for .infrmartion-663-6470 or Univ. ext. 2235.

CORE presents
FOLK SING
with MIKE SHERKER
and CHIC JUNG

Sat., Nov. 3rd
Guild House, 802 Monroe

8:30 p.m.
Donation 50c

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
Cinema q dd
PRESENTS
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
Special Post Halloween Program
JEAN VIGO'S
ZERO FOR CONDUCT
Plus: The Lost World
7:00 and 9:00
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
George Orwell's 1984
SHORT: Mack Sennett's
Half Back of Notre Dame
7:00 and 9:00

LAST CHANCE TO SEE THE BRILLIANT APA COMPANY
IN THE FINAL FALL FESTIVAL PLAY

THE UNIVERSITY of M
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
rwE PROUDLY PRESENTS

ICHIGAN
PROGRAM

I

A PA
JASSOCIATION OF PRODUCING ARTISTS)
IN THE
Ec9 *rsit

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' ' ' F F F'P K aF F K ' F aF K Fafi

YOU'
FREEDOM!
and
AUTHORITY

4t

I

II

'A PENNY
FOR A SONG'

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_..,. _ __ - __- - - - -- - f

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