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October 17, 1962 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIKE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE PTVE

TIlE MICHIGAN flAILYPAGE UIYK

..

Limeliters Display Dual Role

Knox College Enters
New HUAC Dispute

L IfllEflSr

By BETSEY KENYON
Backstage in the numbered sec-
onds before they left to. catch a
plane to Cincinnati, Ohio, the
Limeliters discussed their dual
personalities as academicians-
performers.
"Folk music and fifteenth cen-
tury cyclic masses, the subject of
my doctoral thesis, were simultan-
eous occupations for me," Louis
Gottlieb said. "I worked my way
through college as an entertain-
er," he explained.
Gottlieb received his doctoral
degree in musicology from the
University of California at Berke-
ley. But he is not the only academ-
ic member of the singing group.
Alex Hassilev, who switched from
banjo to guitar throughout the
show, speaks four languages be-
sides English. Born in France of
Russian parents, he is fluent in
Russian, French, Spanish and
Portuguese.
Classical Greek
Glenn Yarbrough, tenor, studied
both classical Greek and philoso-
phy in college while supporting
himself as a bouncer in a New
York City hotel.
After their Sunday night con
cert, someone remarked to tl~c
group that they were "fresh on
the scene." This comment drew a
wry look from the folk-singers
since all had worked as singles be-
fore a chance meeting brought
them together in May, 1959.
"Much of our material comes
from our own repertoires as
singles," Yarbrough explained. Re-
cently, however, much of their
material has been coming from
songwriters.
Own Arrangements
Asked about arrangements, he
replied, "Yes, we do our own,"
adding with a grin; "We argue
them out."'
When asked if he considered the
Limeliters ethnic singers, Hassilev
replied that the word "ethnic" is
meaningless because it is. used to
describe so many different things.
"I am a folksinger when I am
singing a Russian folk song, an
entertainer other times," he ex-
plained. Concerning any interna-
tional flavor of the Limeliters'
songs,, he said simply, "We sing
what we like, and hope we enter-
tain."

INTELLECTUAL SINGERS--The folk-singing Limeliters dis-
cussed their academic side after their performance Sunday night.
The group does not call itself "ethnic" but sings what it likes to
sing, member Alex Hassilev commented.
'REVOLUTION':
Reverend Notes Youth's
Neurotic View of Sex

By "MICHAEL ZWEIG
Knox College at Galesburg, Ill.,
is the seat of the latest contro-
versy involving Frank Wilkinson
and, this time, Fulton Lewis III.
Wilkinson, chairman of the Na-
tional Committee For Abolition
of the House Committee on Un-
American Activities, was invited to
come to Knox by Dennis Stewart,
president of the student senate. He
is to speak at a coffee - talk
Wednesday.
"After learning Wilkinson had
been scheduled officially to come,
the vice-president of the conser-
vative club personally invited
Lewis to come and debate Wilkin-
son on the issue of the HUAC Abo-
lition Committee," William An-
derson, editor of the Knox Stu-
dent, reported Thursday. Lewis
narrated the film 'Operation Abo-
lition' and has spoken in favor of
the HUAC many times.
Coffee-Talk
Upon learning that Lewis had
been invited to debate Wilkinson
at the coffee-talk, Knox Dean
Wilbur Pillsbury announced that
the debate would not be allowed
and that Wilkinson would speak
alone.
He cited three reasons to ex-
plain his opposition to Lewis' ap-
pearance Wednesday. "We do not
want to establish the precedent
that every time a controversial
figure comes to campus, we must
have a debate. Secondly, we have
an extremely crowded calendar
next week. And last November we
had an extensivesdebate at Knox
on this very issue (abolition of
HUAC). We feel that it has been
adequately aired."
Pillsbury said that he talked to
Lewis on the telephone, explained
the situation, and invited him to
come another time if he wished.
Lewis has not responded to that
invitation yet, he added.
Formal Debate
Pillsbury also cited the tradi-
tion of the coffee-talk as a non-
debate presentation or views "not
only political," and defended his
action on the grounds that no
"formal debate" is in order there.
"At first there was considerable
student dissatisfaction with Pills-
bury's decision, but now most of
us agree that it is a bad precedent
Club Combines
Outdoor Fun
With Festivity
Sunday afternoons members of
the Graduate Outing Club combine
outdoor recreation with social con-
viviality as they take to the mea-
dows and woods around Ann Ar-
bor.
"We usually spend the after-
noon walking, but next week we
plan to canoe on the Huron River."
David Williams, Grad, president
of the club, said.
"When snow is on the ground
we sometimes go toboganing and
we may go skiing this year," ac-
cording to Williams. "On Oct.
19, we will have a square dance
with Ivan Parker (of the Office of
Student Affairs) calng " he said.
The Graduate Outing Club
meets every Sunday at 2 p.m. at
the Huron Street entrance of
Rackham. Most of the members
are graduate students, but every-
body is welcome.

to require a debate for any and
all controversial people who come
to campus," Anderson said.
"We have no speaker ban at
Knox," Pillsbury said. "All we de-
mand is that speakers make them-
selves available to questions and
discussion after they speak.
Simple Platform
"We do not want to offer a
simple platform where anyone
may come and speak and then
leave immediately.
In his regular newscast Thurs-
day night, Lewis condemned Pills-
bury for stopping the debate and
commented that Pillsbury "has a
strange notion of academic free-
dom if he allows Wilkinson, a man
identified under oath before the
HUAC as a dedicated Communist,
to speak alone."
Ghelds
Notes Factor
In Accidents
By MALINDA BERRY
An important factor in deter-
mining accident rate, which has
been given little attention in the
research field, has been the rela-
tionship between the driving be-
havior and the accident exper-
ience.
A paper given byhProf. Bruce
D. Greenshields of the engineer-
ing college at the 1962 Interna-
tional Road Safety Congress in
Salzburg, Austria, last month,

USED CARS
ANTIQUE '31 FORD. 75% restored. 718
Monroe. NO 2-1290. N28
'59 SIMCA DELUXE, 21,000 miles. $425.
NO 8-7139. N29
'56 PLYMOUTH. Some body rust, but
otherwise in good condition. Standard
shift. $150. NO 3-1511, Ext. 433. N32
1960« RENAULT convertible Caravelle.
Assume payments. Phone HU 3-1521.
N31
1957 FORD Fairlane 500. 2 dr. Hrdtp.
Power. Really clean body. Call Jim,
NO 3-9893. N30
'58 ,4-door Ford. Excellent condition.
311 Awixa, NO 3-0211. N24
'58 TRIUMPH. Excellent condition, new
Pirelli tires, engine overhauled. $1,095.
NO 3-5446. N17
'55 2-DR. CHEV. Good clean car, stand-
ard trans. $325. HU 2-9425.
PERSONAL

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.20
4 (.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily
Phone NO 2-4786
FOR RENT
ROOM for female student. NO 5-0393
after 5. C24

FOR SALE

SINGLE in private home. 900 Arbordale. FOR SALE: Used Reynold's flute, re-
5-8188. C25 cond. NO 2-5012 after $:00. 332

COUNTRY HOME, unfurn., #gas heat,
yard. Reasonable. Baker Road at Dex-
ter. Please call Hamilton 6-9431. C7
ROOMMATE WANTED to share apt.
with 3 men. 1 block from campus.
$40 per month. Call 2-1950. C8

T. F. & L. D.: Keep watching-It GIRL WANTED to share roomy apt.
should be soon now. F1 ib Own bedroom. Reasonable, calm. 662-1
___u______soonnow. ____ 8330 after 5 p.m. 061

By ELIZABETH ROEDIGER V
American youth is p a s s i n g
through a "sex revolution" giving
it a neurotic rather than an erotic
perspective of sex, the Rev. Cal-
vin Malefyt of the University Re-
formed Church said Sunday.
Quoting Prof. Pitrim Sorokin,
Harvard University sociologist, he
noted that the sex obsession of our
culture seen in advertising, drama,
literature, and art parallels de-

OFFICE EQUIPMENT
For more efficient and
econonical operation. - r
FILES _J _ __:___ __'_
STORAGE CABINETS
TABLES BOOKCASES
In fact, everything you need.
Morrl-s
314 S. State St.
Phone NO 5-9141--

cadent cultures of previous cen-
turies.'
The change in perspective is the
result of the fluidity of our socie-
ty, the search for individual iden-
tity, the urban industrial revolu-
tion, the emancipation of women,
and Freudian psychology, he con-
tinued.
New Freedom
But this new' freedom of morals
has brought neither better mari-
tal adjustment, nor greater per-
sonal happiness, he added. Our sex
goddesses, Brigitte Bardot, Mari-
lyn Monroe, and Elizabeth Tay-
lor, illustrate that sex as an end
soon becomes tiresome.
Perversion is thus the next step
in this quest for happiness, Malefyt
said. But with this experimentation
comes also guilt, self-condemna-
tion, and loss of control.
Traces Progression
Malefyt denied that petting of
itself is harmless. Tracing the pro-
gression in desire for more intense
stimulation, he showed the causes
for couples ignoring more perma-
nent bases for happiness.
There is a casual connection be-
tween premarital promiscuity and
marital infidelity, he explained.
Sex can easily degenerate into
nothing more than animal biology
and lose all meaning, Malefyt said.
God is the antidote for this sex
revolution, whereby a person can
deal with guilt, standards, and
control. Sex thus becomes an ex-
pression of the whole person, and
a source of creative and lasting
happiness, he noted.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gold, jeweled circle pin. Much
sentimental value. Reward, please call
NO 5-6346. A31
LOST-Horn-rimmed prescription sun-
glasses in Aud. A, 9:00 Mon. Call 5-
8732. A27
LOST-Gold necklace with the name
Merreylen on it. Please call 665-7711,
Ext. 6207. A16
LOST - Clipboard with notes. Union-
League Calendar. Vicinity-basement
of League, on Fri., Oct. 12. If found,
call Carl C. at 2-3206. A30

LOLLIPOP" LOLLIPOP!
LOLLIPOP, the Briefs with the
fabulous fit.. . we have them in
the heavenily colors you love.
Get your supply now for the
season.

Kahn Says Means Ineffective
For Dealing with Delinquents

"Elastic Leg" in smoothest combed
cotton. White, pink, blue, mint,
maize, red, seafoam, black. Sizes
4 to 8, 85c.

1~

"Welfare programs dealing with
delinquent children are not doing'
well because of lack of coordina-
tion and inconsistencies," Prof. Al-
fred J. Kahn of Columbia Univer-
sity said recently.'
Speaking on "Planning Services
for Children in Trouble in an Ur-
ban Area," Kahn described the
reasons for their ineffectiveness.
Family agencies do not act as rep-
resentatives of a community posi-
tion.
One of the problems that arises
is lack of careful analysis andj
planning by welfare agencies in
To Give Talksj
On Economics
Prof. Simon Kuznets of Harvard
University will visit the economics
department Thursday and Friday,7
delivering three lectures.1
He will give an informal talk to
Prof. Alexander Eckstein's gradu-;
ate course in economic develop-
ment from 10-11:30 p.m. Thurs-
day. From 8-10 p.m. Thursday he,
will speak on "Analysis of the
Problems of Economic Growth" in
the East Conference Rm, of Rack-
ham.
His final talk will be 3-5 p.m.
Friday ina theEconomics Bldg. on
"Internal Migration and Economic
Growth." It will be delivered to
the Research Seminar in Quanti-
tative Economics.
Students and staff are invited

PROF. BRUCE GREENSHIELDS
.. automobile accidents
represents the first attempt to
measure driving behavior and the
environmental events that shape
it.
The traffic stream flow, high-
way and vehicle design all figure
intimately into the driving per-
formance of individuals.
Time-Lapse
Attempts by Prof. Greenshields
had been made to measure the
behavior of the driver on the
highway more than a quarter of
a century ago. In 1933, time-lapse
pictures were used to measure ve-
hicle speed and spacing.
In 1954 a study conducted at
the Yale Bureau of Highway Traf-
fic determined that it was pos-
sible to measure and characterize
the flow of a traffic stream. From
this it was deduced that it should
be possible to measure and char-
acterize the driving behavior of
the individual driver who collec-
tively makes up the traffic stream
f low.
In a study conducted by the
University Transportation Insti-
tute in 1957 it was found that
there is a correlation between the
way traffic moves and the fre-
quency of traffic accidents, and
that it is possible to pace a driver
and closely imitate his driving per-
formance.
Highway Conditions
To gather data equipment is
needed that will measure driving
behavior and simultaneously re-
cord highway conditions. The di-
rection and frequency that the
driver turned the steering wheel,
the 'depression of the accelerator
and the application of the brake
comprised the drivers actions.
These actions weren't so difficult
to record, but it would be impos-
sible to record everything that
the driver sees.
It was determined that in terms
of time, events on city streets may
not be perceived until they are
within a few seconds of the driver.
From this it was judged that the
time-distance at which events
start to influence the driver, "may
vary from 20 seconds or more on
the open highway to as little as
two or three seconds on a busy
street."

"SIMMS." Do you always call when
you see RED. Mary. F13
CLASSIFIED STRIKES AGAIN-Happy
Birthday, Irene Rath! Glo
OPENING SOON -THE NEW MUG.
WATCH FOR IT. F50
TO THE FRIENDLY COLLIER'S sales-
man: I'll bet you didn't expect to
see this. ch F22
TO THE BOY with the demufflered car:
Still driving across lawns? sirhc
F21
HEY, HEY! Guess what we've got Fri-
day? I. I. (That's Inside Information!)
P16
A.A.-Thanks for the ride-and what a
ride! Let's dorit more often. You know
who across the Hall. F17
COMING SOON-THE GRAND OPEN-
ING OF THE NEW MUG - DON'T
MISS IT. Fl
EVER HEAR OF AN ARK with pillars?
Or dryers on stilts? And was it you
J. B. or you T. F. or you L. D. or you
D. L.? It wasn't me . . P15
AUSTIN DIAMOND CORP. - "Where
marginal prices buy quality dia-
monds," 1209 S. University, 663-7151.
F43
COMING SAT., November 10 - Carlos
Montoya. Ann Arbor High. Block tick-
et orders now being taken. Contact
the Bud-Mor Agency, 1103 S. Univer-
sity, NO 2-6362. F14
GIRLS IN NEED of male companion-
ship. Dial NO 5-9343. Notorious hang-
out of all good looking available
males. Ask for Lee, David, Mike, Eu-
gene or Snagglepuss. F11
BOB NEWHART tickets, Hill Aud., Oct.
27, 8:30 p.m. one sale 11 a.m.4 p.m.
Monday through Friday at Hill Aud.
Box Office. 50c, $2.00, $2.50, Tickets
going fast. P19
SWANTED-Football tickets for Home-
coming game (Minnesota). If interest-
ed in selling yours at a reasonabe
price call NO 3-9348, ask for John W.
F6
PIZZA KING
1308 South University
Free, fast delivery, 3 sizes-
12-, 14-, & 16-inch. NO 5-9655
SPRING WEEKEND
CENTRAL COMMITTEE
PETITIONING
NOW!
F20
WHAT MAKES PUSSYCAT RUN? What's
with that nutty at-since when do
cats serenade by whistling in French?
And look at it merrily-go-rounding
at all fours on its two, running around
the traffic circle until its almost
dizzy. And say, did you see that
smile on its face the other day?
Where's this cat's pajamas? Let this
be a lesson: beware the light of the
moon!!! 12
HELP WAN1 ED
DELIVERY BOY-1 hour morning, T,
Th, Sat. Call NO 5-0550. C28
DIXIELAND PIANO PLAYER, call Paul
Klinger, 665-3145, about 6 p.m. H27
ATTENTION NURSES: Michigan reg-
istered graduate and licensed practi-
cal nurses for special duty, esp. in
4-12 and 12-8 shifts. Full-time or part-
time nurses. NO 3-4859.
EXPERIENCED Bookkeeper-Accountant,
female preferred, full-time. Small
business firm. By appointment. 663-
5723. H24
STUDENT WIVES
Exciting job with Sarah Coventry
awaits you. Immediate income in
year around work with high earn-
ings. If you have transportation
and three evenings available and are
neat appearing you may phone NO
2-1908 for interview between 2-4
p.m. H111
OPEN FOR BUSINESS
FIGURAMA
REDUCING SALON
& HEALTH STUDIO
2169 W. Stadium Blvd.
NO 5-0752
OPEN 9-9
Steam baths and showers,
mechanical massage, sun room,
and physical fitness program

NEW ONE Bedroom Apartment at May-
nard House. Will sublet at loss until
Jnue. For 2 or 3 graduate students.
NO 2-1784. C
ON CAMPUS-Well furn, apt. for 2 men.
$100. 3 men, $115. Call 5-4767 bet.
1 and 5 p.m. 3-4660 mornings and
evenings, 6-9 p.m. C47
APARTMENTS FOR RENT - A limited
number of efficiency one bedroom and
2 bedroom furnished apartments
available for Oct., Nov. and Dec.
assignments to married students or
married faculty. Apply at University
Apartments Office, 2364 Bishop St.,
North Campus. or phone 662-3169 or
663-1511, Ext. 3569. C4
Apartments for Rent
CARL D. MALCOLM, Jr., REALTOR
Phone NO 3-0511, evenings:
NO 5-9271 and NO 5-6634
06
STUDENTS
Several apartments available in cam-
pus and Burns Park area.
APARTMENTS, LIMITED
NO 3-0511 Eveninugs
NO 5-9271 and 5-6634
045
FOR RENT-One 3 bedroom unfurnis-
ed house with wall to wall carpeting
in living room, bedroom, and hall.
Available to faculty after Oct. 31.
Conveniently located near North
Campus. Apply at University Apart-
ments Office, 2364 Bishop St., North
Campus, or phone 662-3169 or 663-
1511, Ext. 3569. C3
ACT NOW
Studios from $111.00
1-bedroom from $130.00
Bus transportation to campus
and Ann Arbor business district.
HURON TOWERS
NO 3-0800, NO 5-9162
STUDENTS
Do yout want to live in a new.
luxury two - bedroom, furnished
apartment - But do not have
enough roo imatea to carry the
load-don't hesitate-call Apart-
ments Ltd, NO 3-0511. Evenings
NO 5-9271. NO 5-6634. We will ar-
range meetings for interested
parties. Hurry-only four available.
C27
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE NEEDED to University Park
(State College) in Pennsylvania or
vicinity. Oct. 19; will share expenses.
Call NO 3-3384-ask for Barb S. G17
WANTED: ride for two to Chicago or
as close to Omaha as possible, leav-
ing Ann Arbor Friday afternoon, Oc-
tober 19. Call 3-1561, ext. 320 for
Betty or 3-3384 for Fran. E. 012
Drive Yourself
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes,
MOVING VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
H 2-4434
59 Ecorse Road
Ypsilanti, Michigan
MUSICAL MDSE
A-I NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
REAL ESTATE
WHITMORE LAKE furnished two-bed-
room remodeled home, garage, fire
place, excellent beach, twenty min-
utes to campus. But for $400 down
and $65 a month or lease for $85 a
month. HI 9-2225. RI

ELECTRICAL

The BUD-MOR AGENCY featuringt
finest muslc:
Maximilian
DougBrown
Johnny Garverd
Andy Anderson
Clarence Byrd
Dick Tilkin
Bell Tones (Ron Bell)
Art Bartner
Men of Note
Bill Curtin
The Classics
Don't delay-
plan your parties right away
1183 S. University, Phone NO 2-636
THE
MICHIGANENSIA
IS YOUR
ALL-AMERICAN
YEARBOOK
BARGAIN CORNER
ATTENTION ROTO
Officers' Shoes
Army-Navy Oxfords-$7.95
Socks 390 Shorts 6S
Brasso 690
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington
MISCELLANEOUS

the
62
M2

Refrigerators
Electric ranges
Gas ranges
Washing machines
Television sets
Radios
Desks
Dining Room sets
Bedroom suites

1

Miscellaneous articles of all kinds.
Clothing for the entire family.
One set of Corpus Juris Law books.
034
BUSINESS SERVICES
FEMALE DESIRES Babysitting work.
NO 8-9709. .J13
FOR THE FINEST SELECTION of party
favors and unique gifts contact Bud-
Mor Agency, 1103 S. University, NO
2-6362. J4
MANUSCRIPTS, TERM PAPERS typed,
Multilith Offset for' reproduction,
Photo- copy, mailings. Gretzinger's
Business Service, 320 S. Huron.' HU
2-0191. J8
THE HAIRIEST SHOP IN TOWS
M-Den Barbers across from the Hill
Auditorium. Basement of Michigan
Pharmacy. .76

assigning a child to an institution
or placing him on probation.
"Case records compiled by psy-
chiatrists or social workers are
virtually ignored," Kahn said.
In addition few case histories
show. initiative in preventative
planning. For example, an agency
will merely give a relief check for
assistance even though there is an
obvious parental problem.
"Another limiting factor in so-
cial welfare success is competition
for agency resources," he added.
The decision as to which agency's
facilities will be used may de-
pend on its relation with a proba-
tion officer.
Often agencies' definitions of
function, procedure and philosophy
differ. One agency may undermine
the efforts of another.
Kahn expressed a need for
workers who represent all commu-
nity agencies and can provide a
total family plan.
"There is a need for a common
structure for welfare services that
will alloy diversity in handling
complex problems," Kahn pointed
out.

PADLOCKS,^NITE LITES
SNACKS ON THE RUN
NYLON STOCKINGS AND
MOUSE TRAPS
You name it, we have it
at
709 Packard

HALLOWEEN PUMPKINS and Decora-
tions. One mile from Stadium. 2617
Saline Rd. B27
FOR SALE: Women's quality used
clothing (plaid English woolen skirts)
size 10-12. Call 663-2823 mealtimes. B6
BRAND NEW ROLLEIFLEX 2.8f, Penta
Prism viewflinder, Rolleinar lenses,
lots more. Retail $600. Best offer takes.
Call Ron, NO 2-0902. B35
CHRISTIAN ENTERPRISES
STORE
3650 CARPENTER ROAD
PHONE--NO 8-9629
Tue., Wed., Thur.-8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Open: Mon., Fri., Sat.-8 a.m.-9 p.m.
Furnishings for home or apartment.
Re-upholstered and refinished furni-
ture.
Bide-A-Beds $64.50 up
Sofa Beds $37.50 up
Platform Rockers $22.50 uV
Occasional Chairs 3.50 ut

. A. ................*.... '.............. "A ..v iw.

YOU ARE IN
TO ATTEI
A TRUNK SH
of DELA MERE
Friday, Octobe
The Delamere repres
fashion consultant will
you in making your sel
Fur trimmed from . .. ..
Untrimmed from . ...
Finest imported cashmeres

VITED
ND
OWING
COATS

APPLIANCES
$29.50
$27.50
15.00
17.50
27.50
4.50
4.50
24.50
42.50

up
up
up
up
up
UP
up:
tap
up

r

19th

Y

AIRFLIH TTONEWYORK
Thanksgiving Vacation Wed.-Sun., Nov. 21-25
Plane & Hotel & Broadway & U.N. Tour and Transfers

entative and
gladly assist
Jection.

. 9

. . . . . 65.00
. . . . . 49.95
.. spec. 89.95

"Contourette" in finest combed

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