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October 17, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-17

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PAGE 8IX

THE MI~tCHlIG~AN t iAI

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WEDINESD.AY, UOCTOBERX17, 1962

STUDENTS' ATTITUDES:
Advertiser Discusses Survey

Madden, Potter Debate
NSA at SGC Program
By EDWARD HER STEIN

By GERALD STORCH
Although 22 per cent of certain
college students in the state feel
that advertising tends to be mis-
leading, repetitious or insulting to
the intelligence, 68 per cent
possess a favorable attitude to-
ards advertising.
These were the main results ofI
a survey taken during the spring
months by the Michigan Council
of the American Association of
Advertising Agencies.
Gerald Murphy, an assistant
marketing director for a company
in Detroit, spoke to the Marketing
Club Thursday night about the
survey, which was conducted in
order to find out students' atti-
tudes towards socio-economic and
career aspects of advertising.
Three Phases
The study consisted of pre-test-
ing, an advertising campaign and
post-testing. Approximately 600
students at the University, Michi-
gan State University and Albion
and Alma College were interview-
ed in January. A different set of
600 students, selected on the same
random sample basis, was then
interviewed in April.
During the intervening period,
advertisements were placed in the
student newspapers at MSU and
Alma to depict career opportuni-
ties and advantages in the adver-
tising field itself.
The other two institutions were
control groups so that the effect
of the advertising program on stu-
dent attitudes could be deter-
mined.
Partial Results
Although "not. yet at liberty"
to unfurl the complete findings
or their reasons in this aspect of
the survey, Murphy did reveal that
several of the shifts in attitude
were negative.
For instance, 13 per cent fewer
students in the second group felt
that advertising is a vital contri-
bution to the economy.
In both groups, there was sub-
stantial agreement that advertis-
ing, particularly television com-
mercials, is an affront to the
intelligence.
Distaff Image
Also, the students seem to have
the advertising field "pegged" as
an area where money, pressures
and "not particularly altruistic"
characteristics are predominant,
Murphy continued.
Program Brings
Russians To 'U'
A six-man Russian medical
delegation, taking part in an ex-
change program, is visiting the
Mental Health Research Institute
and other University facilities.
Four of the six visitors are psy-
chiatrists and two are pharmacol-
ogists.

(/..

Therefore, advertising men must
strive to improve their "image"
and remove this stereotype. As the
brunt of student complaint cen-
ters on advertising techniques and
practices, it might be prudent to
"clean up" commercials or impose
a more stringent code upon them,
he suggested.
On the other hand, "students
don't indict all of advertising
because of commercials they dis-
like," he said. In fact, they believe
that advertising plays a "dynamic
and positive role in the economy"
and constitutes a "significant
force in the culture."
Both Sides
While the image of the advertis-
ing man in the student eye was
one of being opportunistic, Ivy
League, aggressive, materialistic,
colorful and conformist, he was
also seen as creative, successful
and hard-working.
Murphy also revealed several
other pertinent results of the
survey:
1) Students most critical of ad-
vertising were majoring in the
natural sciences, while the most
favorable were enrolled in business
management.
2) Advertising ranks about in
the middle in the list of careers

desired by students. When the first
survey was taken, diplomatic ser-
vice was rated first, but dipped to
seventh in the second set of in-
terviews. Journalism also declined
sharply.
Mostly Democrats
3) The students most critical of
advertising and of business in
general tended to express disgust
with materialistic culture values,
and also tended to be Democrats.
Students at the University were
more critical of advertising than
those at the other three institu-
tions.
4) The student attitudes appear
to be set by the time the inter-
viewees entered college. Personal
observation of advertising was by
far the most significant factor (99
per cent) in molding the opinions,
while 83, 63 and 43 per cent of
the sample also cited reading, gov-
ernment policy and college profes-
sor influence respectively as major
factors. There was practically no
difference in attitude between
freshmen and juniors.
Only male undergraduates were
surveyed. If the scope had been
expanded, Murphy said, the sam-
ple would have had to be increased
so greatly as to warrant prohibi-
tive time and expense.

United States National Student
Association delegates are "at-
tempting to say something they
have no right to say" when they
pass resolutions regarding nuclear
testing and the House Committee
on Un-American Activities, Bill
Madden, '65L, said at the Student
Government Council orientation
program yesterday.
Madden, a former national com-
mitteeman of the Young Ameri-1
cans for Freedom, and Paul Pot-
ter, National Affairs Vice-Presi-
dent of NSA last year, debated the
topic, "The NSA and the Concept
of a National Student Com-
munity."
Both debaters agreed that at
least in some small sense, there
was a national student community,
and that NSA could do much for
that community. They disagreed,
however, on just what types of
action it should concern itself
with.
Must Take Stands
Potter argued that NSA was ob-
ligated to take stands on such is-
sues as nuclear testing and HUAC
because it "oculdn't reject the no-
tion that they had implications
for students." He also pointed out
that NSA fulfills a role which no

COLLEGE ROUNDUP

By MICHAEL ZWEIG
COLUMBUS-Students for Lib-
eral Action at Ohio State Univer-
sity have voted to oppose the
withdrawal of Ohio State from the
United States National Student
Association.
They also created a committee
to confer with NSA representative
Dennis Shaul. It will plan a cam-
paign to keep OSU in NSA. The
question will come before the stu-
dent body in a campus-wide vote
Wednesday.
* * *
STANFORD - The Stanford
University faculty and services
committee voted to ask President
Wallace Sterling to appoint five
students to the committee. The
students are to have full voting
rights.
Prof. Eric Hutchinson, chair-
man of the committee, said,
"Stanford students have long
wanted a hand in affairs affect-
ing them. Student affairs is the
most useful place . . . to work
with faculty members on matters
of mutual interest. This is going
to be a meaningful change."
* * *
NEW BRUNSWICK - Students
at Rutgers-Douglass are trying to
establish a new chapter of the
Congress of Racial Equality.
The move stemmed from a "We
Stand Behind Meredith" rally at

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AN OPPORTUNITY TO GROW
IN THE HIGHEST PROFESSIONAL
WORKING ENVIRONMENT
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
PHYSICISTS
MATH EMATI CIANS
Technical representatives
of the MITRE Corporation
will be conducting interviews
on campus
dcoC er 18A196'

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MITRE designs and develops systems that enable our mili-
tary commanders to detect attack and retaliate instantly.
Typical systems include Nuclear Detection and Reporting
Systems, North American Air Defense Combat Operations
Center, and Back Up Interceptor Center. MITRE is also
experimenting with techniques for future air traffic con-
trol systems.
For the young systems engineer there is no more rewarding
work. You associate with the top men in your field. You
work in an atmosphere that allows you to extend your
capabilities professionally and academically.
At MITRE, men trained in single disciplines are encour-
aged to grow beyond their original fields of interest. Systems
designers learn to work from an increasingly broad base.
You may work in such diverse areas as information
theory, computer design, display techniques, propagation,
or human engineering. You may analyze. You may syn-
thesize. You may deal with systems or individual compo-
nents. At the highest levels, you may have to consider,
political, economic and social factors ... as well as the
available and predictable technology.
Requirements, B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. in these disciplines -
electronics, physics, and mathematics. MITRE is located in
pleasant, suburban Boston. If an interview will be incon-
venient, inquiries may be directed in confidence to Vice
President - Technical Operations, The MITRE Corpora-
tion, Box 208, Dept. UMD 10, Bedford, Mass.
MITRE, an independent nonprofit corporation, working
with - not in competition with - industry, serves as tech-
nical advisor to the Air Force Electronic Systems Division,
and is chartered to work for such other Government
agencies as the Federal Aviation Agency.

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which Don Wendell, CORE rep-
resentative on the East Coast, was
present.
LOS ANGELES - University of
California at Los Angeles Chan-
cellor Franklin Murphy announced
that the NAACP and ACLU chap-
ters have been granted the right
to hold business meetings on cam-
pus.
The permission was granted
with the stipulation that "Uni-
versity facilities may not be used
in planning or implementing pro-
grams of social action."
* * *
BERKELEY-The student sen-
ate defeated a proposed amend-
ment to its by-laws limiting the
Group To Play
Mozart, Piston
The Stanley Quartet will pre-
sent a concert at 8:30 p.m. today
at Rackham Aud.
The program will include Mo-
zart's Quartet in B-fiat major,
Piston's Quartet No. 4 and De-
bussy's Quartet in G minor. The
Quartet is composed of Professors
Gilbert Ross, violin, Gustave Ros-
seels, violin, Robert Courte, viola,
and Jerome Jelinek, cello.
BAHA'U LAH
(The Glory of Gd)
FOUNDER
BAHA'I
WORLD
FAITH
A Few Appreciations
Of The Baha'i Faith
DR. NELS F. S. FERRE: "I have
been surprised at the depth and
devotional character of the best
in BAHA'I Scriptures, as presented
in Townshend's, The Promise of
All Ages." (Strengthening the
Spiritual Life, Harper & Brothers.)
T 0 L S T O Y: "Baha'u'Llah's
teachings now present us with the
highest and purest form of reli-
gious teaching."
DR. GEORGE WASHINGTON
CARVER: "I sympathize with the
Baha'i Faith with all my heart be-
cause it has the spirit of Christ
in it."
One of England's greatest schol-
ars, DR. BENJAMIN JOWETT of
OXFORD: "This Baha'i movement
is the greatest light to come into
the world since the time of Jesus
Christ. You must watch it and
never let it out of your sight. It
is too great and too near for this
generation to comprehend - the
future alone will reveal its import."

senate to taking stands on "issues
that affect UCLA students in their
role as students."
The student senate is now pro-
hibited from taking stands on
issues which the university's chan-
cellor rules "off-campus."
* * *
NASHVILLE-Southern School
News . reported that nine public
colleges in Southern and border
states had voluntarily desegregat-
ed since May.
It also said that ten states and
the District of Columbia had start-
desegregation of college faculties.
The desegregated colleges are
Florida State University at Jack-
sonville, Daytona Beach Junior
College, Mantee Junior College,
Georgia State College at Milledg -
ville, East Carolina College at
Greenville, Wilmington Junior
College, Arlington in Texas and
the University of Houston in Texas
and Mary Washington College at
Fredricksburg.
States in which college faculties
are beginning desegregation are
Delaware, F 1o r i d a, Kentucky,
Maryland, Missouri, North Caro-
lina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas
and West Virginia.
Southern school news said that
234 of the 285 tax-supported col-
leges and universities in the .re-
gion were predominantly white or
white institutions, 146 are de-
all white. Of the predominantly
segregated.

WILLIAM MADDEN
... nuclear testing
other United States group is able
to fulfill when it is able to con-
sider events outside of the scope
of everyday student life.
For example, he said, NSA was
the only United States organiza-
tion able to help students in Al-
geria when the country was in up-
heaval. Later, he noted, the state
department followed NSA's aid
with similar assistance of its own.
Madden said that there are two
reasons why NSA should be wary
of concerning itself with such is-
sues. The first is that NSA dele-
gates are often chosen haphazard-
ly instead of democratically, as re-
quired, and have no mandate to
speak for the United States stu-
dent community. The second is
that most of the delegates are un-
qualified to speak on those issues
outside the realm of everyday stu-
dent concerns.
Calls for Reform
Madden argued for reforms in
the selection of NSA delegates,
and for the realization that NSA
"can only speak as a group of stu-
dent leaders."
Both debaters agreed that NSA
attempts to develop the role of
students and that it should be
constantly concerned with such
issues as academic freedom, in
loco parentis, and the cost of high-
er education-issues of immediate
and everyday importance to mem-
bers of the national student com-
munity.
United .Fund
Drive Begins
The University has begun its
annual campus campaign for the
Ann Arbor Area United Fund.
This year's campaign directors
are University Executive Vice
President Marvin L. Niehuss and

Prof. Robert Bowman
school of public health.

Charles
Ezra
Greene
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
ninth in a series of 21 articles fea-
turing the namesakes of the men's
residence halls.)
By LOUISE LIND
Bushy-haired and moustached,
the young professor stood rigidly
behind the lecturn as he an-
nounced the next assignment to
his civil engineering students.
He spoke in the clear, imper-
sonal manner reserved for the
classroom. The assignment was, as
usual, a heavy one, but no one
in the classroom was surprised;
this was the class of Dean Char-
les Ezra Greene, and everyone
knew the high standard of
achievement he set for his stu-
dents and himself.
"And why not demand the very
best from one's students?" he
might ask, were he alive today to
take issue with this. "They will
only learn, as I have, through
hard work."
Bridge Authority
Hard work at Harvard Univer-
sity and the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology had indeed
paid off for the dean of the newly-
formed engineering college. He
was an authority on bridges, truss-
es and other civil engineering
works.
His book, "Graphics for Engi-
neers," had introduced a revolu-
tionary method of discovering
stresses in structures. He had
earned distinction as "the man
who made bridge building easy."
Professionally, he had served as
consulting engineer for several en-
gineering undertakings and had
designed the Ann Arbor water-
works and sewer system.
No Teaching Experience
When he had come to the Uni-
versity in 1872, the Massachusetts-
born (1842) engineer had had no
experience in teaching but had
remarkably little trouble adapting
to the demands of an academic
position.
He proved himself an outstand-
ing teacher blessed with a logical
mind and clarity of expression. It
was said that he could convey an
idea to his students' minds with
the same accuracy with which he
would throw an actual bridge
across an actual chasm.
In 1895, when the University
decided to divorce the engineer-
ing college from the literary col-
lege, he protested even though he
knew of the University's intent
to appoint him dean of the new
division. He was a firm advocate
of the belief that the engineer's
education should be as broad as
possible and that in a professional
unit the tendency would be to
narrow it.
Until later departments of engi-
neering were added, there con-
tinued to be room in the engineer-
ing curriculums for liberal arts
studies.

By THOMAS DRAPER
"The present stance of Atlantic
Union movement is a natural re-
action of a society that is losing
world dominance,'' Prof. H. Merrill
Jackson of the Mental Health Re-
search Institute said last week.
His speech was the fourth in a
series of conferences this weekend
on Atlantic unity.
Speaking on the ethical implica-
tions of Atlantic Union, Jackson
observed that during the period
from 1945-55 the United States en-
joyed world dominance,
"Today I would say we are the
most powerful nation," Jackson
said. "We have a tremendous bat-
tery of weapons and striking pow-
er. But since we cannot use these
weapons, we will lose dominance
by other means. If we are to con-
quer our successor it will be as
Greece conquered Rome."
To Entrench Dominance
Jackson said that he could not
go along with the Atlantic Union
movement to the extent that the
movement was an effort to en-
trench the dominance of Western
society by means of military and
economic supremacy.
Jackson said that industrializa-
tion is necessary in the underde-
veloped nations today. "If neither
the democratic or Communist bloc
brings this about, the leaders will
bring it about anyway through
autocracy. If these underdeveloped
Compile Data
On Students'
Study Areas
The vast majority of foreign
students attending the University
are enrolled in scientific and tech-
nological programs, Robert Kling-
er of the International Center
said.
According to the 1961-62 fig-
ures 'ompiled by Klinger, 908 of
the 1,254 foreign students at the
University, or 72.4 per cent, were
enrolled in science or technology
courses.
In analyzing the reasons for this
large difference in fields of con-
centration, Klinger cited two main
factors. "First, developing nations
and their peoples generally place
technological and practical de-
velopment ahead of cultural gains.
"Second, the United States,
generally reputed to be foremost
in scientific and technological ed-
ucation and process, is popularly
known internationally as a com-
paratively uncultured nation," he
explained.
Klinger also noted, however,
that this concept of America as
uncultured soon changes and that
"by their second year, the foreign
students have become more aware
of America's 'culture and tend to
become more appreciative."
AAUW
BOOK SALE
Student Activities Building
Wednesday 9-9
Thursday 9-1

of theI

Jackson Evaluates
Atlantic Union Ethics

.',::}..{."}''",."...... }:......... . . . . . . . .....*...*.*...*":":1::":":.............*.*.r.. %%% ...VI} f.'r ..v. ... .

JOAN
BAEZ
In Concert
ALEX PAVLINI, Emcee
Wed., Nov. 7, 8:15 P.M.
FORD AUDITORIUM
Tickets at Grinnell's (Downtown),
Marwil's Northland and Eastland.
$3.75, $3.00, $2.25, $1.75.

4

The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the University of
Michigan for which The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial respon-
sibility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564
Administration Building before 2
p.m. two days preceding publication.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17
Day Calendar
1:00 p.m.-Dept. of Anatomy Seminar-
Dr. J. V. Basmaj Ian, "Muscle
Functional and Electromyog-
raphy"':Room 2501, E. Medi-
cal Bldg.
7:30 p.m.-Introductory Computer Lec-
ture Series-Brice Carnahan,
"Introduction to High Speed
Digital Computers and the
MAD Language": Natural
Science Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Professional Theatre Pro-
gram-Association of Produc-
ing Artists in "The Tavern":
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Concert -
Stanley Q artet: Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Stanley Quartet: The Stanley Quartet
of the School of Mpsic, Gilbert Ross,
violin, Gustave Rosseels, violin, Robert
Courte, viola, and Jerome Jelinek. cello,
will present a recital on wed., Oct. 17,
8:30 p.m. in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
Quartet compositions they will perform
are by Mozart, Piston, and Debussy.
Open to the public at no charge.

General Notices
Students in Areas of Study supported
by the National Science Foundation are
reminded that the deadline for filing
applications for Cooperative Grad Fel-
lowships and Summer Fellowships for
Grad Teaching Assistants is Nov. 1. Ap-
plications are available in the Fellow-
ship Office, Room 110, Rackham Bldg.
All Teacher's Certificate Candidates:
The Teacher's Certificate Application is
due at the beginning of the junior year.
It should be turned in to the School
of Education by Nov. 1. The address is
1203 Univ. High School.
Law School Admission Test: Applica-
tion blanks are now available in 122
Rackham Bldg. or in 1223 Angell Hail
for the Law School Admission Tests
to be held during 1962-63. The first
administration of the test will be on
Nov. 10, and applications must be re-
ceived in Princeton, New Jersey by Oct.
27.
National Program for Graduate School
Selection: Application blanks are avail-
able for the Grad Record Exam tests
to be held during 1962-63. They may be
picked up in Room 122, Rackham Bldg.
The first administration of the test
will be on Nov. 17, and applications
must be received in Princeton, New Jer-
sey by Nov. 2.
Faculty, College of Lit., Science, and
the Arts: The freshman five-week prog-

ress reports (all grades) will be due
Fri., Oct. 19, in the Faculty Counselors
Office for Freshmen and Sophomores,
1213 Angell Hall. Midsemester reports
(D's and E's only) will be due Fri.,
Nov. 9.
(Continued on Page 8)

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You are cordially invited to attend the

r

CAMPUS

UNITED NATIONS

countries are excluded, then we
break from the ethics of the un-
ion."
Prof. Robert L. Nicholson of the
University of Illinois concluded the
conference with a summary of the
ideas presented and a closing ad-
dress.
Individual Liberty
. Nichols said that Atlantic Union
exists not to impose military dom-
inance, but to preserve the Judaic-
Christian values of the importance
and rights of the individual.
"If You admit totalitarian states
to a union they will use that union
to further their own regimes,"
Nicholson said. "The goal of the
union is the preservation of free-
dom."
Start Study
On Degree
The master's degree program in
the business administration school
currently is undergoing examina-.
tion from the American Associa-
tion of Collegiate Schools of Busi-
ness, which is compiling a list of
accredited programs to be released
next year.
Each university desiring to be
considered for accreditation has
had to submit "a detailed pros-
pectus" of its business school's
activities, Dean Floyd A. Bond of
the business school has reported.
In addition, thle dean and asso-
ciate dean from each of these
schools has had to appear before
the AACSB's executive committee.
Dean Bond is a member of the
association's standards committee.
He noted that many of the na-
tion's t o p graduate business
schools, including Harvard Uni-
versity's, are participating in the
accreditation program.
Sawson Enterprises Presents

I1

C

THE YOUNG DEMOCRATIC CLUB
invites you to hear
PROF. ROBERT J. NIESS
Candidate for State Senator, Washtenaw County
discuss
"Major Issues of the Legislative Campaign"

Friday, October 19-
7:00 P.M.-
8:30 P.M.-

Michigan Union Ballroom
Keynote Address by G. Mennen Williams,
Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs
"The Moral and Spiritual Factors in the Struggle
for World Community"
Delegation caucusses (it will be unnecessary for

the delegations to meet beforehand)
Saturday, October 20- Michigan Union Ballroom

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BAHA'U'LLAH
and the
CHRISTIANS
will be discussed
by Winston G. Evans
Thurs., Oct. 18, 8 p.m.
Auditorium A, Angel Hall
PUBLIC INVITED

10:30 A.M.-

Address by Prof. John G. Stoessinger,
School of International Affairs, Columbia U.
"The Alternatives in U.N. Financing"
General Assembly: open debate on the topic of
U.N. finances and all related topics
Adliornment

TONIGHT AT 7:30

1:30 P.M.-
430n PM.

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