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October 17, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-17

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17,1962_

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1962 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

U.S., Britain

Welcome

Katanga, Congo Pact
To Halt All Hostilities

New
Jewish
Bible
By LEE LINDER
Associated Press Religion Writer
PHILADELPHIA-A new Jewish
Bible, first ever translated into
modern English directly from the
ancient Hebrew text, says Moses
didn't really cross the Red Sea
and revises the Third Command-
ment to condemn perjury, not
profanity of God's name.
The new book, to be published
Jan. 28, says Moses led the Child-
ren of Israel out of Egypt through.
the parted waters of the Sea of
Reeds, a marshy area near the
Red Sea and not far from the
present Suez Canal.
There are many other sweeping
changes in this Bible, known as
"The Torah, the Five Books of
Moses."
Five Books
Actually, The Torah-containing
Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Num-
bers and Deuteronomy-is the first
of three scheduled volumes of the
Holy Scriptures, commonly known
together as the Old Testament.
The other-prophets and writings
-are to be completed by 1975.
The new English translation
virtually eliminates the word
"soul," and it provides an entirely
new meaning to the expression
"with all my heart," asserting the
phrase doesn't imply loyalty or
devotion, as previously understood,
but rather means agreement.
The translators said they took
advantage of new archaeological
discoveries in the Holy Land-in
Israel and surrounding Arab na-
tions-to interpret the original
Hebrew.
The first words of Genesis now
are "when God began to create the
Heaven and the Earth." The old
version, published in 1917, started
"In the beginning God created
the Heaven and the Earth."

MOISE TSHOMBE
. what next?

THOR:
Blow Up
HONOLULU (')-A Thor missile
carrying a nuclear warhead aloft
for a high altitude explosion mal-
functioned and had to be destroy-
ed Monday night eight minutes
after blastoff;
Tiny radioactive fragments drop-
ped on Johnston Island and the
ocean around it.
It was the fourth United States
failure in five high altitude at-
tempts. The Atomic Energy Com-
mission said there were no reports
of injuries and no danger to per-
sonnel.
Although radar tracking had
failed to show the fragments re-
turning to earth, a check discov-
ered a number of small pieces, the
largest two by eight inches..They
contained some Alpha radioactive
contamination.
The AEC said no hazard to test
personnel was anticipated and or-
dered clearing of debris from the
island.

U.N. Source
Cites Treaty
As 'Hopeful'
Agreement May Lead
Towards Unification
UNITED NATIONS (1) - The
United States and Britain wel-
comed a cease-fire agreement
signed yesterday between Katan-
ga and Congolese armed forces
as a step toward implementation
of acting Secretary-General U
Thant's Congo unity plan.
United Nations sources close to
Thant said the agreement signed
in Elisabethville, capital of seces-
sionist Katanga province, was an
encouraging sign. But they cau-
tioned also against making too
much out of it at this stage.
The agreement provides for a
freezing of troop movements by
the central Congolese army and
the Katanga gendarmerie of Pres-
ident Moise Tshombe pending ar-
rangements for their integration.
Ends Sporadic Hositlities
Under the agreement both sides
will receive medical supplies, fuel
and food supplies under UN guar-
antee. It also calls for an exchange
of prisoners. It ends year-old spor-
adic hostilities in North Katanga
that were a major source of fric-
tion in the Congo.
Still to be worked out is a
means of obtaining a pledge of
allegiance by the Katanga gen-
darmerie to the Congolese Army.
UN military observers on the scene
said they were hopeful this would
be put on the dotted line today.
A spokesman for the United
States delegation hailed the agree-
ment as a hopeful development
that might pave the way for the
long sought unification of the Con-
go. He noted that there is still a
long way to go before that is
achieved.
Similar Reaction
British reaction was similar.
Both the U.S. and Britain along
with Belgium support Thant's plan
for Congo unity.
Word that the agreement was
imminent.caused U.S. Ambassador
Adlai E. Stevenson to tell Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy on Sunday
there is now some hope of working
out a solution in the Congo. Stev-
enson also had optimistic report
from George C. McGhee, under-
secretary for political affairs whc
is in the Congo U.S. sources said
UN officials working to imple-
ment Thant's plan were taking a
wait-and-see attitude. Under th
plan Katanga's mineral revenues
would be shared on a 50-50 basi
with the Central Government. A
constitution for a Federal Cong
would be worked out and the Ka
tanga Gendarmerie would b
merged with the central army.
Another complicating factor wa
a new demand from Congo Pre
mier Cyrille Adoula that Katang
turn over all its foreign exchang
desirved from exports of the Bel
gian-controlled Union Miniere Co
Prelates Vote

Vietnamese Rebels
Destroy U.S. Planes
SAIGON (M)-Another American spotter plane went down Mon-
day in South Viet Nam's rugged central highlands where Viet Cong
ground gunners earlier had shot down two United States planes.
Three American fliers died in one plane supporting an intensive
government raid.
It was not known immediately whether the third plane fell vic-
tim to Communist fire. The American pilot of the third plane was
reported injured. In ground ac-
tion, an American major was
wounded severely in an explosion.
The toll of Americans killed in
action in Viet Nam has reached 24.
The action between government
co ers troops and guerrillas for the last
four daysdhascentered about 220
WASHINGTON ()-The United miles north of this city.
States is arming its helicopters in The Communists are believed to
South Viet Nam because the Com- have moved an anti-aircraft team
munists have been stepping up into the area.
attacks on them while they ferry They shot down a U.S. Air Force
Vietnamese troops into battle, a fighter plane flying over the
Defense Department spokesman wreckage of the spotter plane yes-
said yesterday. terday. The fighter pilot escaped
"Because of increased attacks with minor injuries.
on our helicopters it has become The second spotter plane-third
necessary to give them additional victim in two days-crashed north
means of protecting themselves," of Pleiku.
the spokesman said. The pilot was reported taken to
iroea hospital in the coastal city of
Air Cover Nha Trang.
In addition to the arming of The American major and three
helicopters, the spokesman said, Vietnamese troops wounded in an
the Vietnamese air force is flying explosion near Quang Ngai were
air cover where necessary to pro- flown to the same hospital.
tect the troop carriers. A big U.S. Army H-21 helicop-
The spokesman stressed there ter, one of several that went down
has been no change in policy on due to mechanical trouble Mon-
conditions under which U.S. mili- day, was destroyed deliberately
tary men advising the South Viet- Tuesday. Repairs would have taken
namese may open fire. That is, too long, it was reported.
they may fire back if fired upon. Government troops have been
The Pentagon confirmed the engaged against guerrillas in a big
new move after Communist guer- operation for the last four days.
rila .1,r(nw Ah.d U.S. rJenWn.c-W

Kohler Sees
Khrushchev
In Moscow
MOSCOW (Y)-Foy D. Kohler,
the new United States ambassador
to Moscow, yesterday had his first
conference with Premier Nikita
Khrushchev since taking up his
post.
A brief communique said they
talked for three hours -in the
Kremlin in an atmosphere of sin-
cerity and mutual understanding.
"They touched important in-
ternational issues and also ques-
tions of Soviet-American rela-
tions," the communique added. It
seemed certain that the Berlin
problem was high on the agenda.
Seeks Appointment
The meeting and the announce-
ment that in New York, Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gro-
myko sought an appointment with
President John F. Kennedy in
Washington Thursday came amid
faint signs that the Kremlin is
becoming worried about the strong
American reaction against Soviet
activities in Cuba and Berlin.
Those in Moscow who hold this
view noted a tempering in Soviet
press attacks against the Western
garrisons in Berlin.
Other Westerners here disputed
the idea of a softening in the So-
viet cold war position.
They said any signs of Soviet
moderation have been canceled out
by the Kremlin's hard line in the
Geneva nuclear test ban talks, by
its rocket rattling over Cuba and
its mounting threat to sign a sep-
arate peace treaty with Communist
East Germany.

By JOE HALL
Associated Press Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Congressional
advocates of federal aid to educa-
tion are wondering if the eruption
of the religious issue in the 87th
Congress has blighted indefinitely
their chances to pass legislation.
Three senators who long have
pushed for such bills say that the
fight to win passage of education
legislation would be renewed in the
19634 session.
But they agreed that prospects
are highly uncertain, in large part
because of the bitterness arising
from the injection of religious
questions into the debates over
school bills in 1961-62.
Biggest Segment
President John F. Kennedy ask-
ed the 87th for six major educa-
tion bills, but none passed. This
was the biggest segment of his
program to go down the drain in
the first Congress of his adminis-
tration.
Playing a key role in the defeats
was the question of whether
church connected schools should
receive grants along with the pub-
lic institutions, or be limited to
loans.
Many legislators argued that
grants to private schools were un-
constitutional, a violation of the
doctrine of separation of church
and state.
Private Institutions
But others from districts with
heavy Catholic populations declin-
ed .to support grants for public
schools unless aid for the private
institutions was put on the same
basis.
Secretary of Health, Education,
and Welfare Anthony J. Cele-
brezze, who took office after most
of the bills were stymied, has said

.......

I

the administration will push for
all of them next year.
But Sen. Joseph S. Clark (D-
Pa), a member of the Senate edu-
cation subcommittee, says he fears
the result would be another stale-
mate unless the Democrats add a
number of seats in the House in
next month's election.
Same Trouble
Sen. Patrick V. McNamara (D-
Mich), also on the subcommittee,
says "we'll try again but I don't
know how it will come out. I ex-
pect we may have some of the
same troubles we had this time."
Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R-NY)
says the fight must be made again
because "the need is clearly there."
But it will take a strong biparti-
san effort to afford any chance
of success, he said.
"The religious issue was inject-
ed into aid for colleges this year
for the first time," he said. "It
has caused trouble on aid for ele-
mentary and high schools for a
long time. I don't see how we can
overcome it."

DIAL 8-6416
* ENDING TONIGHT *

See Church Issue
As Hindering Bill

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
OSLO-Premier Einar Gerhardsen questioned yesterday the le-
gality and effectiveness of the U.S. government's plans to crack down
on Western ships carrying Communist supplies to Cuba.
"The reportedly planned steps must be termed rather wide-rang-
ing in a situation where there is no declaration of war or blockade,"
he said in a speech in the Storting (parliament).
"There are also reasons to question the legality of the steps if they
are enforced in the form which has been suggested. The Norwegian
government is concerned over a development where shipping is being
drawn in as a means of political pressure.
* * * *
UNITED NATIONS-Communist Yugoslavia yesterday denounced
as absurd and fantastic the arguments put.forth by the Soviet Union
and the United States for continuing nuclear weapons testing.
* * * *
ACCRA-Ghana yesterday lifted the curfew imposed on Accra
and Tema Harbor Township on Sept. 21 but the state of emergency
declared following a series of bomb explosions remains in effect.
MIAMI-Usually informed Cuban exile sources reported yesterday
Fidel- Castro married a girl from Santiago, Cuba, several weeks ago.
Her name was given on a Spanish language broadcast over Miami sta-
tion WMIE as Isabel Coto.
NAPLES-An earth tremor rippled through an area east of Naples
last night, causing some alarm in communities that had been hard hit
by severe shocks last August. But there were no reports of injuries
or damage.
* * * *
CHICAGO-The United States Olympic Committee board of di-
rectors certified Detroit as the American city to bid for the 1968 sum-
mer Olympic games. Lake Placid, N.Y. was selected to bid for the win-
ter games.
The bids will be placed before the International Olympic Com-
mittee, scheduled to meet in Nairobi, Kenya, Oct. 13, 1963.
DALLAS-Dr. R. L. Stubblefield, psychiatrist appointed to examine
former Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, said yesterday he will ask two
other psychiatrists to help him determine how to go about it.
Dr. Stubblefield, of the University of Texas medical school, said
he will consult Thursday with Dr. Andrew Watson, professor of
psychiatry at the University of Michigan, and Dr. Titus Harris, retir-
ing professor of psychiatry at Texas. He did not say where they will
meet.

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s
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a
e
7.

r its SIM UWn a . . rL~l
sance plane, killing three men, in
South Viet Nam's highlands.
In Action
It was reported from Saigon yes-
terday that U.S. Army helicopters,
firing rockets, had been in action
for the first time against a Com-
munist strongpoint.
The U.S. has had helicopters in
Viet Nam for nearly a year. They
have been carrying Vietnamese
troops on strikes against Commu-
nist insurgents, often reaching in-
to areas which the Reds long had
controlled.
Algeria Head
Hails Advance
of Cuba .revolt
HAVANA MP-After Washington
talks with President John F. Ken-
nedy, Algerian Premier Ahmed Ben'
Bella flew to Havana yesterday
and said, "Algeria is and will be
with Cuba."
Ben Bella hailed what he called
the Cuban Revolution's "extraor-
dinary progress" and said he was
"deeply happy and moved to be in,
Cuba."
"Comradery always reigned be-
tween Cuba and Algeria," Ben Bel-
la said.

NAACP Announces Drive
Against Job Discrimination
WASHINGTON (JP)-The National Association for the Advance-
ment of Colored People announced yesterday a series of legal actions
aimed at halting alleged racial discrimination in the labor field.
Robert L. Carter, NAACP general counsel, said the proceedings
filed in San Francisco, Atlanta and St. Louis seek to eliminate alleged
job discrimination among seamen; steel workers and railroad trainmen.
Carter said the organization will file more court actions and pro-
ceedings before the National Labor Relations Board "in the very
near future." These are the legal proceedings in the courts and
before the National Labor Rela-t

tions Board announced by Carter:
Seamen-complaint filed at the
NLRB San Francisco regional of-
fice contending the AFL-CIO Sea-
farers International Union has re-
fused to allow Negroes to register
and qualify for the more skilled
and better paying jobs controlled
by the union.
Steel workers-complaint filed
with the NLRB office at Atlanta
against Local 2401 of the AFL-CIO
steel workers union, contending it
had created different job classifi-
cations and wage rates for Negro
and white employes doing the
same work.
Trainmen-an NAACP suit, filed
in the U.S. District Court in St.
Louis.

I

An

"Dutch Auction"
SALE
THIS WEEK
FOLLETT'S
PHOTO DEPT.
DON'T MISS IT!

'Con Be Proud of its
OSCAR!"
-Rose Pelswick,
N.Y. Journal American
"Astounding from
Beginning to End!"
-Paul Beckley,
N.Y. Herald-Tribune
* THURSDAY *
ne Day Only-From 1 P.M.
"AIDA" and
"MADAM BUTTERFLY"

COLOR WMieSmall
,,ft EmbaMsyFMoumsaRelease

p

I

MONO"

w..

Ii

i; :
r;
'' ,

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Proudly Presents
THE
APA
jASSOCIATlON Of PRODUCING ARTISMS
OTHE

HEAR YE!

HEAR YE!

Henceforth, let it be known

that the

courageous,

red-blooded,

For Council
Cornmissions
VATICAN CITY (Am) - Roman
Catholic prelates from around the
world-2,700 strong-cast ballots
yesterday to elect drafting com-
missions of the church's first-in-a-
century Ecumenical Council.
Ten subgroups of 16 members
each are being chosen to prepare
and present proposals to the Coun-
cil. An electronic computer will
tabulate the votes.
All day long the global gather-
ing of bishops, archbishops, patri-
archs and cardinals-all with an
equal voice and equal weight given
their votes-filled in lists of favor-
ed candidates.

BY GEORGE M. COHAN
Directed By
EINi4 Rabb
"Wonderful Buffoonery ...
Lots of Fun"
-Boston Herald
"Droll,
Demented,.
Delightful !"
-N.Y. Herald
Tribune

ERII

Mighty Men of Taylor

I

R
s ,1

in order to rid the earth
of the scourge of all illiterate,

animalistic beings known

as the

..--"

"T

r7

Announcing the Eleventh Annual
MICHIGAN COLLEGE WORKSHOP
ON HUMAN RELATIONS
St. Mary's Lake Camp Battle Creek
October 26, 27, and 28

ticker Ashwortbf
Rod Sladel
Keene Curtis
Russell Gold
Rosemary Harris
David Hook~s
Page Johnsoni
Barba lKnight
Enid Markey
Anne Meacham
Ellis Rabb
Richard Woods

inhabitants of Gomberg-Challenge
said offensive beings to a
fug of war across the Huron River
in order that they be cleansed,

SECTION MEETINGS:

INFORMAL DISCUSSIONS:

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