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October 17, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-17

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN UATlr.V

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PAGE TO THE iCUJIll(11 BATIV

WED.PNSDAY~, OCTOBERK 17, 1962

Speaker Advocates
Teaching Capitalism

APA in Melodrama Spoof

SOUTHERN SCHOOLS:
Article Deseribes Academic Freedom

t+>-

State universities should be "ar-
dent advocates of free enterprise"
teaching "the principles that made
this nation great," George A. New-
ton, former president of the In-
vestment Bankers Association of
America, declared Friday.
A luncheon speaker before the
Association of Governing Boards
of State Universities and Allied
Institutions, Newton denounced
"the holes being shot through our
free enterprise system."
As examples, he cited the recent
case in which "Big Government
displayed its might in anger
against Big Steel," the Senate op-
position to private ownership of
the Telstar satellite, and "feather-
'U' Initiates
New]Polic
The University, in collaboration
with five other state colleges, is
offering a special program for as-
sisting students aiming at careers
as college teachers.
The new program, "Michigan
Scholars in College Teaching," has
been made possible by a grant
from the Ford Foundation, which
integrates the last two college
years with the first year of grad-
uate study.
Other Members
Participating with the Universi-
ty are Albion College, Alma Col-
lege, Calvin and Hope Colleges at
Holland, and Iglamazoo College.
Under the program students,
who are-selected for scholastic ex-
cellence by the faculty members
of the colleges taking part, are
given special opportunities and
counseling in their own schools.
The program is designed so that
the undergraduate student in the
participating colleges will be able
to move ahead rapidly and effec-
tively in his graduate work at the
University. .
'U' Students Eligible
Virtually every discipline taught
at the baccalaureate level will be
open to students under this pro-
gram at the University.
The student will receive advice
regarding preparation to teach in
the area of his choice. At each of
the colleges a coordinator has
been appointed to work with the,
student and the appropriate Uni-
versity graduate department. It
will also provide information re-
garding available scholarship aids.+

bedding" by unions in the airlines
and railroad industries.
Government Growth
In a more general context, he
condemned the growth of govern-
ment activity in the areas of busi-
ness regulation, welfare, and
spending in general.
"This is a far cry from the rug-
ged individualism of our ances-
tors," Newton charged.
"Ours seems to have become the
age of the 'common man.' We say
with pride in this country that
'all men are created equal,' then
we seem to go through life try-
ing to keep them that way," he
continued.
Emphasize Mediocrity
"Emphasis is on mediocrity at
the very time quality is needed,"
Newton added.
The main thing Americans learn
today is "a sense of fear," Newton
continued. As one manifestation of
this "fear," he cited a letter from
125 professors at an eastern uni-
versity, asking the United States
to cease its nuclear testing.
Horrible War
"I believe in God and that he
gave us the A-Bomb first to end
a horrible war, but he didn't con-
template that we would dominate
the world. But neither did God ex-
poect us to bury our talent in the
ground so that others could catch
up orget ahead of us," Newton re-
marked.
He said that, to combat these'
trends, colleges should teach:
1) That "rewards go to the in-
dustrious, that the backbone of o,1r
economy is profits and it is profits
that keep the welfare wagons roll-
ing," and that "self-reliance is the
greatest security in the world."
2) That students should vote and,
take part in public affairs.
3) That students should have
"the ability to communicate."
"If each of us strives to be a
living example and articulate
spokesman of these beliefs, then1
the Fourth of July will not be just
another day of 'independence' but
again celebrated as The Day of In-
dependence," Newton concluded.
League To Show
World Fashions
The International Committee of
the Michigan League will present
an International Fashion Show at
7:30 p.m. today/in the Vandenburg
Room of the League. The models
will be wearing the national dress
of their respective countries. Y

-Daily-Samuel Haberman
SPINE-TINGLING - A spell-binding, hair-raising classic, George M. Cohan's "The Tavern,"
will be presented at 8:30 p.m. today by the Association of Producing Artists. Continuing through
Sunday, the spoof of old-time melodramas is a boisterous account of a mysterious vagabond, played
by artistic director Ellis Rabb, who appears suddenly one dark night at a country tavern and
comes face to face with a delightful, demented group. Rosemary Harris will play the governor's
daughter, a lisping, tittering girl who has a flirtation with the vagabond. Enid Markey will play
the governor's haughty wife and Russell Gold will portray the villain. Anne Meacham will appear
as "the dark lady" and the pompous governor will be played by Richard Woods.
INTERNATIONAL WEEK:
Panel Notes American Image Abroad

By KENNETH WINTER
The University's recurrent con-
troversies over academic freedom
in Ann Arbor can't hold a candle
to the problems of southern
schools, as cited in the October
issue of Harper's Magazine.
An article by Prof. C. Vann
Woodward of Yale University, a
native of the South, describes ac-
tions taken against students and
faculty members of 17 southern
colleges for their political activi-
ties in the past few years.
The most dangerous political ac-
tivity, according to, Prof. Wood-
ward's account, is to advocate or
take action for racial integration.
Sanctions Imposed
However, he also notes sanc-
tions imposed for opposition to
the House Committee on Vn-
American Activities, membership
in the American Civil Liberties
Union, and the support of "liberal"
or "left-wing" causes in general.
The motivating force behind
most of the actions taken against
students and faculty has been "a
wave of reaction - led by the
White Citizens Councils, the John
Birch Society and the Ku Klux-
ers," Prof. Woodward reports.
He also noted actions initiated
directly by southern governors,
other state officials, and school
officials.
Cites Cases
Cases cited by Prof. Woodward
include:
1) A history instructor from
West Texas State College at Can-
yon was berated and physically
assaulted in the college president's
office by a member of the school's
board of directors, because the in-
structor had spoken against the
HUAC film, 'Operation Aboli-
tion.' The instructor resigned.
2) A University of Mississippi
Law School professor was pres-
sured into resigning, because he
was an ACLU member and because
he defended the legality of Su-
preme Court decisions.
Faculty Resign
Within a two-year period over
one-fourth of the Ole Miss faculty
has resigned, and all faculty mem-
bers are required to produce an-
nually a list of the organizations
they have joined or supported.
3) Following the 1960 sit-ins
in Montgomery, Alabama State
College, a Negro school, exper-
ienced a wave of reprisals. Nine
students were expelled, 20 were
suspended, one professor was fired
and 17 faculty members resigned.
The faculty resignation was
triggered by Gov. John Patterson,
who went on television to label
the professor "a communist sym-
Niess To Discuss
Campaign Issues
The Democratic candidate for
state senator from Washtenaw
County, Prof. Robert Niess of the
French Dept., will speak tonight
at 7:30 p.m. in Rm. 3B of the
Michigan Union on the "Major Is-
sues of the Legislative Campaign."

;.,.-
i
i
i

pathizer and racial agitator" and
demand his dismissal.
Dismiss Students
Following these incidents, Ala-
bama (followed by Tennessee,
Georgia and Louisiana) has in-
struced its state colleges to "dis-
miss promptly any student . .
arrested and convicted on charges
involving personal misconduct."
Prof. Woodward goes on to note
that "the present revival of Mc-
Carthyism is by no means con-
fined to the South."
Summing up, Prof. Woodward
writes "the colleges have felt the
wrath of the resistance to the
(integration) movement because
and the fury of the 'Radical
Right,' because they have some-
times furnished enlightened oppo-
sition to the reactionaries."
"Freedom to think, to teach and
to learn are a standing threat to
the program of those who lead the

, -
I

[

...

assault on academic freedom," he
adds.
Considering solutions to the
problem, Prof. Woodward reports
that the American Association of
University Professors, helped by
some Federal court decisions, has
been the main fighter for aca-
demic freedom so far.
He says that the best solution
is "an aroused public opinion in-
formed by exposure of outrages
and abuses."
Announce Subject
Of Anatomy Talk
Dr. J. V. Basmajian will speak
on "Muscle Functional and Elec-
tromyography" at 1 p.m. today
in East Medical Bldg. The lecture
is under the auspices of the de-
partment of anatomy.

By STEVEN HALLER -
and JOHN KELSON
"The American abroad is his
own worst ambassador," Georgina
Iwanowski, Grad., said yesterday
during a panel discussion of "The
American Image Abroad."
The discussion, one of a series of
events commemorating Interna-
tional Week, was moderated by
Prof. Martin Needler of the po-
litical science department. Other
members of the panel were Jorge
Garcia-Gouza, Grad., and David
Cantrell, Grad.
Miss Iwanowski noted that the
preconceived ideas most people
hold about the American image
abroad are not necessarily those
which prevail. The popular image
of Americans abroad is gained by
European contact with tourists
and students.
Superficial Trips
The tourist goes to Europe
mainly because he can afford it;
he is interested only in flying from
one place to another, spending
three hours or so in each major
tourist attraction and gaining
what Miss Iwanowski referred to as
a "picture-book guided tour of
Europe."
The American student abroad,
however, goes to Europe to find
"emancipation" or "truth." In the
process, he "plays at being "Euro-
pean," but due to his own ignor-
Carnahan To Talk
About Computers
Brice Carnahan, assistant direc-
tor of the Ford Foundation project
on computers, will speak on "In-
troduction to High Speed Digital
Computers and the MAD Lan-
guage" at 7:30 p.m. today in
Natural Science Aud.

LECTURE SERIES

Wednesday-Oct. 17-8 P.M.
Panel-"Lay Apostolate"
Moderator-James Montgomery

ance only succeeds in making a;
spectacle of himself," she con-
tinued.
Prof. Needler interjected the
Angell Views
Atkantic Union
By PHILIP SUTIN
International strategies and At-
lantic Union were reviewed last
week in the third of five sessions1
dealing with "Atlantic Union, To
What Purpose, In What Form."
Prof. Robert C. Angell of the
sociology department warned that
Atlantic Union might harden Rus-
sia attitudes and drive the So-
viets to a closer alliance with the
Chinese Communists.
He declared that the West
should remain strong, but not at
the same time appear to be threat-
ening the Russians.
In the long run, Prof. Angell
continued, the two blocks will have
to learn to live with each other
and some sort of "super-society"
will develop. This may take the
form of international law.
Into Soviet Hands
Jacques Bude, Grad, warned that
Atlantic Union would drive the
underdeveloped nations into the
hands of the Soviets. He explain-
ed that these nations play the
short-range interests of Europe
against the long-range interests of
the United States.
"The Congo would be in Russian
hands had there been Atlantic Un-
ion. The United States recognized
that Europe only saw short-range
interests and pressured Europe in
long-range terms," Bude explained.
U.S.-U.S.S.R. Playoff
He declared it would be better
if the underdeveloped nations had
Europe and the United States com-
peting rather than the West and
the Communist bloc.
Prof. Robert L. Nicholson of the
University of Illinois, favoring At-
lantic unity, said that a federa-
tion could result in $30-5O billion
savings within 10 years. This mon-
ey could be used to help provide
the $40 billion worth of capital
needed by underdeveloped nations
each year.
This aid, he added, would keep
the neutrals from joining the So-
viet camp.

supposition that many Americans
find it more prudent to cover up
their true colors because "Amer-
icans get charged more."
American Dollar
Cantrell pointed out that many
Americans hold the belief that
Europe's economic existence de-
pends upon the American dollar,
and therefore expect due consider-
ation. Miss Iwanowski attacked
this idea as "erroneous," saying
that while abroad, Americans
should be people first and a na-
tionality second.
Garcia-Bouza argued that tour-
ists are always tourists, no matter
what their particular nationality
may be. He went on to define a
tourist as "one who, when arriv-
ing in a new town, complains that
there are too many tourists there."
The image of Americans and of
America are actually two separate
entities, Garcia-Bouza noted. He
said that even if one does not ac-
tually meet Americans, it is im-
possible to escape the "pervading
influence" of the American way
of life.
Furthermore, he explained, for-
eigners' attitudes toward America
often change upon visiting Amer-
ica themselves. Many of them re-
main here for study or research
programs; it is these individuals,
Garcia-Bouza concluded, who are
truly our best ambassadors abroad.
I

1429 Hill Street

ALL ARE WELCOME

/n ThePERLBERSEA TNON
Production o!f. ww
"Suspen s.MM76
filled1 T A O
so remarkable 4 shows Doiy
because the 6:115-8:55
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TRUES" TcXic&OR
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NEWMAN CENTER . . . 331

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A.. . A HEART-TWISTER FOR
MIIUST!i THOSE WHO LIST TO LOVE!"
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4

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
Presents
DR. LOUIS L. ORLIN, Assistant Professor Ancient
Near Eastern Languages and Literature
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, at 8:30 P.M.
on
"THEORIES OF THE ORIGIN OF ISRAEL"
Following Sabbath Services which will be chanted by NORMAN BRODY

Thompson

IL

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NOW _________

DIAL
5-6290

TOMORROW

DIAL
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THURSDAY... ONE DAY ONLY!
GRAND OPERA FESTIVAL!

.Dy~ appiest motionpicture
Ai1ID THE '?:
TECHNICOLOR 49 ""'"
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STARTS SATURDAY_
SIDNEY POITIER-BOBBY DARIN-"PRESSURE POINT"

'-LIFE ,agazll"; 5
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REPRINTED IN FULL FROM THE
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1962. I
Theater: Walt Whitman
Poet's Works Staged The Cast
!WE ch COMRADES TRE lyb
Poet's Miciar Rih~rBaldr dse Hadapted frm'the
at U. of g nvorks of Walt Whitman. Staged by
Ellis Rabb; presented by the Univer-
sity of Michigan ProfessionalTheater
I Program; production designed by An*
By HOWARD TAUBMAN ' Ro; production stage manager,
JNN _ARBOR, Mich., Oct. deih e wn. Ater, Lydia Mn
A N ARO, ih. i, deson Theater, Ann Arbor, Mich.
--Although it flies in Wart Whitman............Will Geer
the face of nearly all the Mother......Cavada Humphrey
drama's laws, "We, Comrades Walt.................Russell Gold
Three" often fills the theater Young Woman ......Rosemary Harrs
I with incandescence.
Why not? The words are one remain* strictly in chard I
almost all from the poems of acter; all have various assign.
Walt.Whitman, ranging from ments. I
the "barbaric yawn" to the With the help of sound and
song of "a shy and hidden visual effects, Mr. Rabb seeks
bird."The theater rarely to fit action to words. His
hears intoxicated language of luck is variable, at its best
this order. in the "When Lilacs Last in
hrde. the Dooryard Bloom'd,"which
Rhard BaIdridge. who has communicates a somber pas-
r this adaptation, does sion. Will Geer, Russell Gold,
I Dot pretend that he has Clayton Corzatte, Cavada,
fused Whitman's imperishable umphrey and Rosemary Hare
threnodies and ecstasies into dept of feeling, and Ann Roth's
E a proper play. Nor does simp le set with its grieving
Ellis Rabb's staging of "We,sh
Comrades Three," which was e r
itroduced last night at the ohe Association of
Lydia Mendelssohn Theate as Producing Artists, a coopera-
the second production of the tv fheater people, which
University of Michigan's new tiv of thenareopol which
ha bengenaged for three uI

I
N

-AND-

O YOURY
FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 19
If you are a qualified engineering stu-
dent who feels your future lies in re-
search or applied engineering, be sure
to see the Linde Company repre-
sentative when he is interviewing on,
campus.
The LINDE Laboratories provide
an ideal growth environment for the
scientific-minded. Significant is the
fact that, in only 15 years, LINDE re-
search and applied engineering people

SPRING WEEKEND
CENTRAL COMMITTEE PETITIONING
POSITIONS AVAILABLE:

Professional Theater Pro-
gram.
But adaptation and stag-
ing seize a good deal of the
freshness and wonder, the
earthiness and compassion
that the uninhibited singer
poured into his poems. It is
impossible to sit through a
-reading and, theatricalized
visualization of lines from
"When Lilacs Last in the
Dooryard Bloom'd" without
being scorched by their brood-
ing grief. It is difficult not
to be noved' by Whitman's
bitter lamentation on the
Civil War and its killing of
brother by brother.
Yet there aresmoment
when the Whitmanesque lyr-
icism becomes too heady,
and the production becomes
too stagy. "We. Comrades
Three" is largely a mood
piece. There is nothing of
usual conflict and characteri-
zation, and the piling of emo-
tion upon emotion through
wordspstrains one's powers of
absorption.
Mr. Baldridge has divided
his material into two large
segments--"The War" and
"The Reconstruction" - and
culled his Whitman with

-..-yp
.ama

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