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October 13, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"V TwoTHE MICHIGAN DAILY
/" 7 T ' I T aW~ - -h..',ri - 1 .

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1962

Schmidt Urges Atlantic Union

with powers enumerated and lim-
ited by a constitution.
Schmidt reiterated Streit's five
basic areas in which the federa-
tion must be given powers. They
are defense, citizenship, commu-
nications, trade, and currency.
Many think the federation would
be ratified in the United States
by the amendment process,
Schmidt said. "I frankly think that
we could copy the system used by
the founding fathers to ratify our
original constitution," he added.
United States Delegation
A delegation from the United
States was authorized in 1960 to
participate in a North Atlantic
Treaty Organization conference on
greater economic and political co-
operation, Schmidt noted. "The re-
sulting document, the 'Declara-
tion of Paris' accomplished virtu-
ally nothing. However, they did call
for another meeting within the
next two years. Perhaps we can
hope for some progress then," he
said.
The Atlantic Unity Conference,
originally planned for late lasti

PROF. JOHN F. SCHMIDT
... world unity
spring, is holding two panel forum
discussions and a closing address
today at 9:30 a.m., 1 and 2:30 p.m.
in Aud. A.

Offer Data
On Bacteria
In Sewage
Giving certain "methane bac-
teria" an electric field in which to
do their work may increase the
efficiency of many sewage treat-
ment plants, Prof. J. A. Borchardt
of the College of Engineering said
Thursday.
Prof. Borchardt reported the re-
sults of his research in this field
before a Toronto meeting of the
Water Pollution Control Federa-
tion.
According to Prof. Borchardt,
the organisms in question are re-
ferred to as "methane bacteria"
because they are employed in the
final stage of reducing sewage to
simple, non-harmful organic ma-
terials, of which methane is one.
Environmental Study
"We are interested in what will
make these organisms function
best," Prof. Borchardt explained.
"Our study has been carried on to
develop the best environment for
them based on the use of proper
potentials within their medium."
The bacteria are extremely sen-
sitive and appear to grow best
within a very narrow range, Prof.
Borchardt said.
As the bacteria do their work
in their bio-chemical environ-
ment, the process itself and the
amount of sludge they are fed pro-
duce a constantly changing acid
balance in the environment, Prof.
Borchardt added, He pointed out
that safety factors must be built
into a fermentation system be-
cause of these uncontrolled varia-
tions.
Control Acid Balance
This development may permit
large reductions in the fermenta-
tion tank volume by controlling
the acid balance by applying the
proper electric field to the en-
vironment, he continued. He was
able to define the potential range
in which the bacteria can best
exist.
Prof. Borchardt and his. assist-
ants made detailed observations of
active bacteria cultures. At least
four electrodes were used in each
culture and were allowed to come
into chemical equilibrium for at
least a full day before measure-
ments were made

'PROFILE OF MICHIGAN':
'U' Economists Claim
Sobotka ReportUnfair

ENDING
TON IGHT

TWO ENCORE HITS!

DIAL
8-64 16

Kish Notes Development
Of EEC School System

University economists have la-
beled a report, "Profile of Michi-
gan," written by a former Uni-
versity of Chicago economist "just
another smear of Michigan."
Professors William Haber aind
Daniel R. Fusfeld of the econom-
ics department recently received
advance copies of the book by
Stephen P. Sobotka, currently em-
ployed by a Massachusetts busi-
ness consulting firm.
The report states that high
wages forced manufacturers to
divert capital into technological
changes and automation, bringing
more unemployment than in com-
parable industrial areas.
Curb Union Power
Sobotka said that a great deal
of labor unrest and union "mono-
poly" frightens out-of-state man-
ufacturers away, and he recom-
mends legislation to curb union
power.
Sobotka claimed that Michigan's
tax program, or lack of one, must
be partly blamed for the state's
economic troubles.
He also criticized Michigan's
system of higher education.
Costly School System
The school system, he stated
"now absorbs a large part of the
state-collected revenues.
"But a large part of the funds
needed for these institutions is
collected, not from the recipients
of education or their parents, but
from the working population of
the state and its industry," So-
botka charged.
Sobotka also asserted that Mich-
Michigan Tech
Hits New High
Fall enrollment at the Michigan
Institute of Mining and Technol-
ogy has reached a record 2,765
according to Registrar T. C. Ser-
mon.
All but 777 of this year's stu-
dents are from Michigan, includ-
ing 805 from the upper peninsula
and 1,183 from the lower penin-
sula. Out-of-state students include
618 from 28 states and 159 from
19 foreign countries.

igan needs a greater diversifica-
tion of its industry.
Sobotka's way of encouraging it,
however, is to "induce more women
to enter the labor force." This, he
said, would attract outside in-
dustries who hire women for work
at which they are more economi-
cally suited than men.
Highly Skilled Labor
Haber and Fusfeld said the re-
port was "wrong, both in its
method of measuring statistics and
in a number of the results."
They said that wages were high-
er in Michigan than in some other
industrial areas, but attributed it
"to the fact that a higher propor-
tion of Michigan's labor force is
highly skilled."
Wrong Relationship
"Actually, the concentration of
skilled labor in Michigan is one
of the state's produest possessions,"
Haber said. "Other states wish
they had it."
"Instead of measuring the re-
lationship between wage rates and
employment, he actually measured,
without realizing it, the relation-
ship between wage rates and labor
productivity," Fusfeld said.

- TONY 1DALL THELMA RfE
NICK ADAMS -MARCEL DALI -JUlIA MEADE
AN ARWIN PRODUCTION - A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATtoNA REEAE
-AND-
Movie-rwise
C thev has never be#n anything like
"THE
APARTMENT
A MIRScO C0~ 1PMSITW A
JACK LENNON
SHIRLEY NaoLAINE
FRED MoNmRRAT
L:-, *r ,thonlie-wiee!

r

ROCK, HUDSON
DORFS DAY
IN EASTMAN COLOR " CINEMASCOPE

BAHA'I

(Continued from Page 1)

ular elementary or .nsecondary
school if the student's parents
shouldnbe moved toua different
location or if he should leave his
position with EEC.
The schools are supported fi-

* ENDS TODAY *
"THE SKY ABOVE
THE MUD BELOW"

SC
r-

nancially by the E C, and they
have an international faculty.
They serve as a selling point to
entice men with families to work
for the common market.
Language Barrier
One of the greatest difficulties
that must be overcome is that of
the language barrier. A require-
ment for graduation is that the
student must speak his native
language plus two others. The
students in elementary school are
taught in their native language,
but by the time they are 11 years
old, they must use French or Ger-
man for their class work.
This isn't as impractical as it
may sound because with all the
traveling that Europeans do to
foreign countries, they will have
the opportunity to employ their
new tongue. And anyone who
works for the community in as
much as a clerical position will
have to handle at least two
languages.
Follows Requirements
The curriculum follows the re-
quirements in the schools of the
member countries. However, some
new paths are being paved in
order to give the students a united
picture of their locality. Geog-
raphy courses, for instance, are
placing their emphasis on Europe
as a whole rather than upon the
separate countries. Most of the
other social sciences are being
taught with the same cross-cul-
tural design.
Kahn To Discuss
Planning Services
Prof. Alfred J. Kahn of the New
York School of Social Work at
Columbia University will speak on
"Planning Services for Children
in Trouble in an Urban Area," at
4:15 p.m. Monday in Rm. 2065 of
the Frieze Bldg. The talk, part
of a social work-social science col-
loquium, is the thesis of a forth-
coming book.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, "History of Christian
Thought" by Rev. J. Edgar Edwards,
9:30-10:30 a.m.; Faith, Inquiry & Intel-
lect: "Why Inquire," 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 14,
7:30 p.m.; 802 Monroe. Refreshments.
* . *
Newman Club, Movie, "High Noon,"
Gary Cooper, Oct. 13, 8 p.m., 331 Thomp-
son.
Unitarian Student Group, Elections
of 1962-63 Officers, Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m.,
Unitarian Church. Speaker: Dr. M. Pi-
suk, Mental Health Res. Inst., "The
Role of the Student in Peace Research."]

John Allen,
Elisha Rumsey

WORLD

FAITH

i

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
sixth in a series of 21 articles fea-
turing the namesakes of the men's
residence halls. The seventh and
eighth houses in West Quadrangle,
Chicago House, named for the Chi-
cago alumni who, contribute to it,
and Michigan House, one of the
original houses on campus, are not
named after persons. The next eight
articles will feature East Quad-
rangle.)
By LOUISE LIND
John Allen, the young visionary
yet practical man from Virginia,
was a man possessed by a consum-
ing dream; Allen dreamed of
founding a town.
When he and Elisha Walker
Rumsey procured the legal title
to 640 acres of hill and valley in
Washtenaw County, on Feb. 12,
1824, the first step towards making
the dream a reality was 'fait ac-
compli.' The town destined to be-
come county seat and site of a
great university was virtually be-
gun.
Born into. a family of farmers
in 1796, Allen early learned the
value of moving westward to
cheaper land and richer soils. This
and the desire to found a town to
be his living monument led him
to discard his family plans and
turn west in the winter of 1824,
telling neither his parents nor his
wife, Ann, of his mission.
Meets Rumsey
Allen must have been a con-
vincing visionary, for when he
met Rumsey and his wife, Mary
Ann, also called Ann, in Cleveland,
he persuaded the Rochester, N.Y.
pair to help him.
Arriving at the site of a wide
valley southwest of Detroit on
Feb. 6, 1824,the little party ex-
plored the region, claimed it in

their hearts, and proceeded to the
United States Land Office in De-
troit where they gained its legal
title.
Determined to remain in their
"town" through the cold Michigan
winter, Allen and Rumsey built
its first 'house,' two roofless ad-
joining log pens, for Ann Rumsey.
The house later became the
Washtenaw Coffee House, the first
tavern in the area.
Cold in the Tent
Meanwhile, Allen, who lasted
out the cold season in a tent, had
already made contact with old
friends in the East who, along
with their friends, were traveling
en masse across the country to
make their home in Allen's little
town.
The town was officially surveyed
and named on May 12, 1824.
Strangely enough, Allen did not
see fit to call his valley Allens-
burg, Allens Corners, -or any oth-
er self-glorifying name, but rather
chose the alliterative "Ann Arbor,"
in honor of Mrs. Rumsey and her
garden arbor.
Ann Arbor grew quickly, with
Allen and Rumsey serving official-
ly as real estate dealers and post-
master and justice of the peace,
respectively.

TO LIVE THE LIFE IS-
To be no cause of grief to any-
one.
To be kind to all people and to
love them with a pure spirit.
Should opposition or injury hap-
pen to us, to bear it, to be as kind
as ever we can be, and throughkall,
to love the people. Should calamity
exist in the greatest degree, to
rejoice, for these things are the
gifts and favors of God.
To be silent concerning the
faults of others, to pray for them,
and to help them, through kind-
ness, to correct their faults.
To look always at the good and
not at the bad. If a man has ten
good qualities and one bad one,
to look at the ten and forget the
one. And if a man has ten bad
qualities and one good one, to look
at the one and forget the ten.
Neverto allow ourselves to
speak one unkind word about an-
other, even though that other be
our enemy.
To do all of our deeds in kind-
ness.
To cut our hearts from our-
selves and from the world.
To be humble.
To be servants of each other,
and to know that we are less than
any one else.
To be as one soul in many bod-
ies; for the more we love each
other, the nearer we shall be to
God; but to know that our love,
our unity, our obedience must not
be by confession, but of reality.
To act with cautiousness and
wisdom.
To be truthful.
To be hospitable.
To be reverent.
To be a cause of healing for
every sick one, a comforter for
every sorrowful one, a pleasant
water for every thirsty one, a
heavenly table for every hungry
one, a star to every horizon, a
light for every lamp, a herald to
every one who yearns for the
Kingdom of God.
From the

BAHA'I WRITINGS
For information and free literature
write Baha'i Spiritual Assembly,
418 Lawrence St., or phone 663-
2904 or 668-9085.

IL

i

C~wv MCHIGA

TONIGHT at 6 P.M.

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