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October 12, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-12

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EIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Soviet Union Demands
Troika Rearrangement
Of, UN Adinistration

Ecumenical Council
Opens with Pagentry
Pope Urges Unity of Mankind
As Prelates, Observers Convene
VATICAN CITY (i)-The greatest assembly of Roman Catholic
prelates in history-the 21st Ecumenical Council-opened yesterday
with a call for Christian unity by Pope John XXIII.
He urged vigorous efforts toward union of mankind in truth.
"Divine providence is leading us to a new order of human rela-
tions . . . directed toward the fulfillment of God's superior and in-
scrutable designs," the pontiff told the church's first ecumenical coun-
cil in a century. Massed before' ,
him, in dazzling white vestments,

INVASION PRISONERS:
Donovan Returns to U.S.
To Await Castro Decision
MIAMI (M)-Lawyer James Donovan said yesterday he had re-
turned to Miami to await Fidel Castro's decision on whether he will
accept an offer of medicine, drugs and baby foods for the release of
the 1,113 Bay of Pigs invasion prisoners.
"No money is involved," Donovan emphasized.
Donovan's attempts to secure freedom of the invasion prisoners
bogged down Wednesday night in a four-hour meeting in the presi-
dential palace at Havana. Cuban
1/ Family Committee officials, opti-
F'r enc u i utel mistic earlier this week, went into

With Monoco
Nears Crisis
PARIS-Time is running out
for Monaco in the tiny principal-
ity's dispute with France over
taxes.
Conferees representing the gov-
ernments of President Charles de
Gaulle and Prince Rainier met
Wednesday in an effort to reach
agreement. Difficulties persist.
France has said she will estab-
lish regular customs barriers
against the 360-acre Riviera coun-
try.
The dispute between Monaco,
which could comfortably fit inside
Central Park, and France centers
on the principality's policy of not
taxing corporations whose head-
quarters it houses.
Copyright, 1962, The New York Times

seclusion. Leaders Enrique Llaca
and E. A. Suarez spent the day
away from =their homes.
Both Llaca and Suarez said they
hoped an announcement by the
exile organization Alpha 66 of a
raid Monday on. the Cuban port of
Isabella de Sagua had not caused'
the snag in negotiations.
The committee officials express-
ed doubt the raid had taken place.
Suarez asked, "if they carried
out the raid Monday night, why
didn't Castro mention it in his
speech the next night? He was
criticizing many other acts against
his regime and the Alpha raid
would have been a natural for
him to attack in the speech."
Alpha 66 announced yesterday
it was declaring war on all ships
carrying supplies to Cuba. In a
broadcast from San Juan, Puerto
Rico, Alpha leader Antonio Veci-
ana said attacks would be carried
out on all vessels.

Tchernyshev
Claims Staff
Pro-Western
Allott Hits Charges
At Budget Session
UNITED NATIONS ()-The So-
viet Union demanded anew yes-
terday that the troika principle
be applied to the entire United
Nations administrative machinery.
The United States promptly re-
plied that to do so would wreck
the integrity of the world-wide
United Nations staff.
Soviet delegate Pavel M. Tchern-
yshev pressed the campaign for
troika in the General Assembly's
109-nation budgetary committee,
where he met opposition from
Sen. Gordon Allott (R-Colo), a
member of the United States dele-
gation.
Khrushchev's Idea
Under the plan advanced orig-
inally by Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev in 1960, the secretary-
general would be replaced by a
three-man executive representing
the Western, Communist and non-
aligned blocs.
Tchernyshev charged that the
United States and its military
allies dominate the top level jobs
in the United Nations, and de-
manded that troika be applied in
the distribution of the approxi-
mately 1,200 professional posts.
Weighted for West
He said the entire structure of
the United Nations serves the in-
terests of the United States and
its military allies "and the same
may be said about the staff of
the secretariat."
Allott accused the Soviet dele-
gate of being "less than candid" in
making charges that were not new
in any way. Allott expressed regret
that the Soviet speaker sought to
"heap coals on the head" of one
or a group of United Nations dele-
gations.
He asserted that members of
the United Nlations staff should
"act in accordance with the direc-
tives applying to one's office, re-
gardless of personal or govern-
mental views, or to resign one's
office."
United States diplomats said
they viewed the Soviet attack as
primarily a renewal of the annual
campaign for more United Nations
jobs for nationals of the Soviet'
Union and other Communist bloc
countries.

were the 2,700 council delegates-
overseers and pillars of the church
with its future in their hands.
Altogether, about 10,000 church-
men and guests were present in the
enormous basilica.
Delegate-observers from Protes-
tant and other communions had
an honored place at the ceremony.
Many of them joined in the old
Gregorian chants and kneeled and
rose with the Catholics for the
prayers, confessions and litanies
of praise.
He urged diligent efforts "so that
there may be fulfilled the great
mystery of that unity, which Jesus
Christ invoked with fervent prayer
from his heavenly father on the
eve of his sacrifice."
The Pope said the history of
the church hinges on it.
Vatican sources expressed pleas-
ure at a Moscow announcement
that the Russian Orthodox Church,
which has had no formal contact
with Roman Catholicism in more
than nine centuries, was sending
two observers.
Christian love, he said, is the
key to "concord, just peace and
the brotherly unity of all."
Bishops, Patriarchs, Metropoli-
tans, Abbots, Cardinals and Arch-
bishops from around the world sat
in twin, facing tiers along the
nave.
Britain Leader
Wins Approval
of EEC Talks
LLANDUDNO, Wales (P)-Prime
Minister Harold Macmillan's gov-
ernment won a free hand from
the Conservative Party yesterday
to take Britain into the European
Common Market as soon as possi-
ble
A vast majority of the 4,500
party delegates took this historic
decision by a show of hands after
listening to passionately pro-Eu-
ropean speeches by Deputy Prime
Minister Richard A. Butler and
Deputy Foreign Minister Edward
Heath.
The annual conference vote
seemed to assure, once and for all,
Britain's link with her continental
neighbors unless French President
Charles de Gaulle decrees other-.
wise.
Macmillan stamped out almost
all the members of revolt inside the
Conservative Party against his
pro-Common Market policy.

Draft Group
Urges End
To Induction
By THOMAS DRAPER
"If we keep building up the
armed forces we'll wind up with
totalitarianism," the Rev. Henry
Hitt Crane, a member of the ad-
visory committee of the "End the
Draft in '63" committee said.
"Three million men in the arm-
ed forces spread all over the world,
where they don't belong anyway, is
ridiculous," Rev. Crane said.
"We're concerned about the pos-
sibility of q Fascist as well as a
Communist take over as both de-
pend upon a large military ma-
chine," Rev. Crane declared.
Reduce Size
He said that ending the draft
would be the first steps toward
reducing the size of the army.
The "End the Draft in '63"
committee is trying to point out
that the draft comes up for a
vote in 1963, Rev. Crane said.
Letters are being sent throughout
the country to newspapers, citizen
groups, and interested individuals.
All interested are asked to sign
a petition.
List Reasons
The committee's literature lists
these reasons for ending the draft:
1) It demands compulsory
contribution without adequate
compensation;
2) It makes inevitable the in-
dtrination of many young men
with a sense of hostility and
suspicion of those who are class-
ed as enemies, the acceptance
of militarism, and the unques-
tioned obedience to authority,
and
3) It ultimately weakens the
security and strength of the
nation by interfering with the
advanced training.of many men.
Seidman Suggests
Auditing of State
GRAND RAPIDS (M)-The Re-
publican candidate for state audi-
tor general, L. William Seidman,
proposed a taM force of certified
public accountants audit and study
state services to "take Michigan
out of its doldrums."

*
Paintings by
RICHARD WILT
thru October 19
i201 Nickels Arcade--Over post8office
( c . c> <c> c<=->c<:::::c c:c:c sc :::::yo

NEW
on RCA VICTOR
RED SEAL AND SORIA SERIES

POPE JOHN XXIII
... prays for unity
IWorld News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON -Nearly 1000
Mississippi National Guard in-
fantrymen now at Oxford, Miss.,
will be released from federal ser-
vice at midnight next Tuesday,
the army announced yesterday.
* * *
BONN, Germany - Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer lashed back yes-
terday at parliamentary criticism
of his Berlin policy.
* * *
ELISABETHVILLE - President
Moise Tshombe said yesterday Ka-
tanga has offered the Congo cen-
tral government $2 million in
foreign currency for immediate
use.
* * *
UNITED NATIONS-Sir Hugh
Foot, British colonial expert, re-
signed yesterday from his post
amid continuing attacks in the
United Nations on the Macmillan
government's attitude toward
Southern Rhodesian racial ques-
tions. It was reported that he felt
he could not effectively defend
Britain's stand here against inter-
fering with Southern Rhodesia's
white supremacy constitution.
* * *
NEW YORK-Trading was slug-
gish yesterday on the stock mar-
ket. The closing Dow-Jones aver-
ages were 30 Industrials down 1.67,
20 Railroads down .10, 15 Utilities
down .36, and 65 Stocks down .51.

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A superb instrument for home
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BAHA'I
WORLD
FAITH
A PRAYER
FOR ALL MANKIND
0 THOU KIND LORD!
Thou host created all humanity
from the same original parents.
Thou hast intended that all belong
to the same household.
In Thy Holy Presence they are
Thy servants, and all mankind
are sheltered beneath Thy tab-
ernacle.
All are gathered at Thy table of
Bounty and are radiant through
the light of Thy Providence.
O GOD!
Thou art kind to all,
Thou hast provided for all,
Thou dost shelter all,
Thou dost confer life upon all.
Thou host endowed all with talents
and faculties; all are submerged
in the ocean of Thy mercy.
O THOU KIND LORD!
Unite all; let the religious agree,
make the nations one, so that
they may be as one kind, and as
children of the same fatherland.
May they associate in unity and
concord.
O GOD!
Upraise the standard of the one-
ness of humankind.
0 GOD!
Establish the Most Great Peace!
Cement the hearts together,
O God!
0 THOU KIND
FATHER, GOD
Exhilarate the hearts
Through the frognace of Thy
love;
brighten the eyes through the
light of Thy guidance; cheer the

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