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September 11, 1962 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL sTUESDAY,
~W7~'U'Graduate, Professional Train

SEPTEMBER 11, 1962
f
ing

By GERALD STORCH
The University is not only An-
gell Hall, and it is not only cen-
tral campus.
It is instead a vast organism
that stretches from the athletic
plant on Hoover St. through the
Diag and the Medical Center up
to the research complex on North
Campus, and it even has branches
in Dearborn and Flint.

To entering freshmen, this may
perhaps be difficult to realize, or
else of little consequence; and yet
the University is rapidly shifting
its focus from the undergraduate
to the graduate and professional
student.
Post-Graduates Prevail
There are more graduate de-
grees granted than undergraduate,
and the literary college-the do-

main of most undergraduates-
has less than one-third of the 25,-
000 overall total of students.
The University's emphasis on
technical research has probably
been the main factor for the bur-
geoning graduate student mont-
age, because the students partici-
pating in such projects must have
several years of scientific back-
ground at the University level in
order to handle the work.
And as the University increases
its prestige as an elite profession-
al and research institution, it at-
tracts more and more students,
faculty members and grants. This
may be pointed out best by the
University's proportion of degrees
awarded at Michigan's 10 state-
supported schools: in 1961, it gave
out only 24 per cent of the bach-
elor's degrees, but 58 per cent of
the PhD's and 67 per cent of the
professional degrees.
Vast Network
Comprising this graduate and
professionally - oriented network

HEADQUARTERS for
STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES.
OFFICE FURNITURE, TYPEWRITERS and FOUNTAIN PENS

are the 17 schools and colleges.
These include the literary college,
the Flint College and the Dearborn
Center.
The other 14 are the schools cat-
ering mostly to graduate and pro-
fessional work, or to undergradu-
ates desiring intensive training in
a particular field of study, in con-
trast to the "liberal education"
promoted by the literary college.
Architecture College.
Thic college offers three pro-
grams: a five-year professional
program leading to a bachelor of
architecture degree, and four-year
curricula leading to bachelor's of
science in landscape architecture
and design degrees.
It also offers a graduate pro-
gram with several graduate de-
grees,
Most of the A&D work is done
within the college, as only fresh-
men English and several other
electives are pursued elsewhere.
Probably the college's major
problem is space, and it is worse
off in this respect than most of
the other units on campus. The
Architecture Bldg. is located at
Monroe and Tappan Streets, but
the students at times are forced
to receive instruction in other
buildings.
Dean of the college is Philip A.
Youtz.
Business School...
This school provides five differ-
ent degree programs, all of which
require two years' background in
liberal arts.
One of these programs leads to
a master's degree in hospital ad-
ministration, and is conducted
with the aid of the public health
and Medical Schools and the Uni-
versity Hospital. One year of ad-
ministrative residency in a hospi-
tal is required.
The other four degree programs
are confined mainly to, business
and economic considerations, as
are several its research and in-
formational bureaus.
The school sponsors the Bureau
of Business Research, Bureau of

HANDS DOWN-Students in the Medical School must under-
stand the complicated maze of bone and muscle that comprise
the human body. Here an anatomy student examines drawings,
skeletons and his own hands in an effort to understand liga-
mental inter-action. And who's that fellow right next to the
book?

Be a sweet (and smart) cookie In thIs delg
Hemo figure-shaper. Satin elastic panels tuck in
the tummy and derriere ... nylon powernet slims
thighs w-a-a-y down. Waistband Helanca lined for comfort.

SMITH-CORONA & OLYMPIA
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable
ALL MAKES, bought, sold,
rented, repaired
TERMS: We try to suit customer.

Sizes; 3 "M "XI.iswhite. $8,5

Typewriter Repair Work a Specialty
DEALER for A. B. Dick Mimeographs
and Supplies
STUDENT SUPPLIES

IeanRCAuen 9op
ICKELS ARCADE NO 2-2914

FOUNTAIN PENS all makes
Sales & Service
by Factory-trained men.
CHAIRS
DESKS
FILES
Phone
NO 5-9141
Street
IR CONVENIENCE
r over 50 years."

Industrial Relations and Bureau of
Hospital Administration, in addi-
tion to holding numerous confer-
ences throughout the year with in-
terested parties from the business
and industrial world.
The Business Administration
Bldg. is directly opposite (south)
the Architecture Bldg. Its dean is
Floyd R. Bond.
Dental School...
Instruction in dentistry has been
offered at the University since
1875, and is presently conducted
in two adjoining buildings: the
Dental Bldg. and the W. K. Kel-
logg Foundation Institute, both lo-
cated on N. University just east
of the Michigan League.
Along with the architecture col-
lege, the dental school ranks, Uni-
versity administrators say, as the
most badly-off unit in terms of

physical space. Independent ac-
crediting groups have appraised
the school's facilities as distress-
ingly bad in comparison with the
level of instruction.
Facing this problem is Dean
William R. Mann, who was ap-
pointed by the Regents last June
to succeed retiring Dean Paul Jes-
serich.
The school offers both graduate
and postgraduate dentistry curric-
ula.

Education School...

Stationery
Study Lamps
Note Books
Fountain Pens
Loose Leaf Note Books
Greeting Cards
Typewriter Supplies

SPECIAL
ON SURPLUS
3-ring heavy,
black note books
112" ring ... 97c

Since
1908

Read and Use

MORRI
314 South StateS
OPEN AT 8:00 A.M. FOR YOU
"Giving Morrill support fo

Watch for the new MUG
OPENING SOON

This department occupies Uni-
versity High School (kitty corner
from Martha Cook and the Under-
graduate Library) as a laboratory
for its instruction in the art of
teaching.
The school prvoides both'A'and
'B' track programs. The first is
for those students desiring a teach-
er's certificate to obtain a job as
a secendary school instructor.
There is close coordination with
the literary college in this sphere,
with many LSA students taking a
certain number of education cours-
es to obtain the certificate.
The 'B' track includes subjects
in which student teaching is not
available and which are not fre-
quently taught in high schools.
The school has its library facil-
ities housed in the second floor of
the UGLI, and sponsors semester

Michigan Daily Classifieds

I

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.....7 Dr t " aer 1

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