100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 11, 1962 - Image 27

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

11,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAIIN

11, 1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Continues

To

Flourish

with

14-School Network

1

abroad exchange programs with
the University of Sheffield.
The University was the first in
in the country to offer a professor-
ship in the science and art of
teaching-in 1879.
Dean of the school is Willard C.
Olson.
Engineering College ...
Comprising more than three
thousand students, this college pro-
vides undergraduate programs in
13 fields, leading to a bachelor of
science degree.
Several new programs will be
offered this fall. One is the
widely-acclaimed bio-engineering
course, which combines studies in
the medical and biological sciences
with those in engineering. The
participating student would grad-
uate with his engineering degree,
but would be equipped to work
professionally in areas such os
anatomy, bio-chemistry, and oth-
er medical research.
Another new offering is a co-
ordinated degree program in naval
architecture and aeronautical en-
gineering for students interested
in high-speed ground and water
machines.
The engineering college encour-
ages its students to take literary
college courses to attain a broad
educational background, but does
not have a two-year language re-
quirement and maintains a sep-
arate English department.
The East and West Engineering
Buildings are located at the south-
east corner of the Diag.
The .college has its library fa-
cilities on the UGLI's third floor.
Dean is Stephen S. Attwood.
Graduate School...
This is an administrative unit
offering some 25 different degrees,
but the actual instruction is .given
through the faculty and facilities
of other schools.
Located in the Rackham Bldg.
on E. Washington St. next to the
Frieze Bldg., the graduate school
coordinates and approves the en-
trance of students into the other
departments' graduate student
programs.
Much of this work involves the
sponsorship of the rapidly-ex-
panding post-doctoral programs,
in which an individual takes up
research projects in a specialized
area closely related to his doctoral
thesis.
Significantly, the dean of the
graduate school is Ralph Sawyer,
also vice-president for research.
The two jobs are operated by one
man because the functions and
responsibilities in each position
overlap to a great extent.
Law School..
Entering its 103rd year, the Law
School, a three-year course for
a bachelor of laws degree, also
with three other graduate pro-
grams.
its instruction is done by means
of the famous case-study method,
in which the students examine
and analyze the presentation' and
validity of arguments in a given
case. A closed circuit television
hookup with Washtenaw County
Court aids greatly in this respect.
The Law School provides an im-
pressive amount of research, and
its faculty members edit the two
publications in existence pertain-
ing to international law.
The school occupies the campus
landmark known to almost every

know for its summer program at
Interlochen.
The dean is James B. Wallace.
Nat. Resources School
The University's is the nation's
first school of ,natural resources,
established in 1950.
This school offers degree pro-
grams in wildlife management,
fisheries, conservation, forestry
and wood technology.
The last-named is considered to
be one of the most significant and
fastest-expanding scientific fields,
with the University's programs
pioneering efforts.
Many of the top officials in gov-
ernment and private forestry and
conservation bureaus are Univer-
sity graduates, and at the last
count 24 per cent of the forestry
schools in the United States were
headed by alumni.
The Natural Resources Bldg. is
located on East University, north
of the engineering buildings.
The school got a new dean last
June: Stephen H. Spurr.

and professional education to lead
to a bachelor of science in nursing.
And starting next fall, the
school will institute a new gradu-
ate program in medical-surgical
nursing.
Involving two years of academic
work, the project is being financed
by a $250,000 grant from the Kel-
logg Foundation. The program will
provide a master of science degree.
The school, last year comprising
one male student with about 650
women, has its building in the
midst of the Medical Center com-
plex. Rhoda Rheddig Russell is the
dean.
Pharmacy College .. .
This college, formed in 1876,
was the first to be organized at
a state university, and is the small-
est-about 150 students-of the
14 grad-pro school and colleges.
It provides a five-year program
11

BAR EXAM-The Law School maintains an international repu-
tation for excellence of, faculty and course material. Its build-
ings, too, are famous campus-wide anyway for their aura of
tradition and quiet beauty. Here students take their bar exam
in one of the Hutchins Hall lecture rooms.

student and many visitors, the ver-
dant Law Quadrangle on South
State Street and South University.
Students may enter the school
with the only qualification being
the satisfactory completion of
four years of undergraduate work,
plus an entrance examination.
Indicative of the school's ex-
cellence is its extremely high pro-
portion of out-of-state students.
The dean is Allan F. Smith.

to bachelor and master of music
degrees. The school's central fa-
cilities are in Lane Hall, which is
on State. Street just south of
Huron Street.
Its faculty members have won
several international and national
prizes, and frequently give free
concerts on campus. The school is

Nursing School...
In what may be an almost revo-
lutionary move, this school is
actively engaged in recruiting
men, and is hardly discouraged by
the few male applications re-
ceived so far.
The school's basic program is a
four-year one combining general

Medical School...

The Medical School, with more
than 800 students enrolled, is the
largest in the country. It is the
second oldest of the University's
academic divisions, being estab-
lished in 1850.

We are pleased to announce the outline of our program for 1962-63 (5723)

SUKKOT OPEN HOUSE, Thursday, Oct. 18, 3-5:30
ZWERDLING LECTURESHIP in Jewish Studies
HILLELZAPOPPIN, Sat., March 30 (Benefit, UJA)
"JEWISH LIFE THROUGH THE ARTS"
a series of 3 evenings, offered jointly with Beth Israel Center
LECTURE for TORAH TOUR-Rabbi Ben Zion Kaganoff
STUDY GROUPS
Hebrew-Eliahu Shalmon, Instructor
Major Lines and Systems of Jewish Though-Rabbi Harold White, Instructor

ATHLETIC OPPORTUNITY:
Offer Coed Enthusiasts.
Diverse Sports Program

"Wednesday Evenings at 8" (Lecurtes by Faculty)
Weekly Sabbath Services (Fridays at 7:30, conducted by students;
Saturdays at 9 a.m., sponsored by Beth Israel Center)
Israeli Folk Dancing, Theatre Hillel
Saturday Evening Parties, bi-weekly, 8:30-12:00
A special note:
Sun.-Thurs., The HILLEL LIBRARY is open evenings for study and
reference use during the school year.

By ROBERT SELWA
The coed interested in partici-
pating in sports has ample oppor-
tunity at the University.
Instruction in swimming, golf,
bowling, fencing, ice and figure
skating, horseback riding, ballet
and modern dance, badminton,
bareball, archery, basketball and
tennis, is offered. University 'wo-
men find that they can combine
learning with recreation in this
wide variety of ways.
The program is so good that the
University makes it mandatory.
One year of it is required for grad-
uation, if incoming freshmen and
transfer students lack credit for
it on their transcripts.
The program is constituted
along eight-week lines: a coed
changes sports every two months,
and this ensures a diversity of
xperience.
Coeds may earn a Red Cross
Water Safety certificate through
the swimming courses, and this
can help them get a summer job
as camp counselor.
Advanced swimmers and divers
[ may participate in Michifish and
its junior counterpart, Michifins,
extracurricular clubs which hold
tryouts each fall and spring and
which feature syncronized swim-
ming including a water ballet.
This year the water show, en-
Hi1.A «m Rnmal of Mus: ase

r

All students are invited to identify themselves with HILLEL, to enjoy its
facilities, program and personnel, to join committees and to affiliate
as members.

--.... ...- ..... -..- .. .- -. -
IMAIL TO
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
(Please Print)
1 I
1 I
Name
I last first middle
I I
Campus Address (if known)
, Home Address

I

11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan