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October 06, 1962 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-06

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 19+62

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T EEu

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 198S THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAflh~ TTTRI~'P!

xwA 1111flU is

Aw

South Fights

At

Clemson,

Integration
Mississippi
Court Delays
Gantt.Case

Officials Cite

Less Tension
In Mississippi
Marshals Continue
Guard on Meredith
OXFORD (-)-A booing crowd
of students and a report of gun-
shots shattered the mood of eas-
ing tensions on the University of
Mississippi campus yesterday.
Still, there were signs that fed-
eral officials, holding a tight grip
on the situation, feel the crackling
sense of danger is letting up.
Back to Normalcy
Nicholas Katzenbach, deputy
United States attorney general,
said:
"I think we've gone a long way
toward relieving tensions here
and getting back to normalcy."
The developments came near the
end of Negro James H. Meredith's
first 'week as a student at pre-
viously all-white Ole Miss.
The 29-year-old Meredith plan-
ned to leave the campus for ,the
weekend-destination unannounc-
ed, but believed to be a meeting
with his wife and perhaps their 2-
year-old son.
Still under guard of federal
marshals remembering the night of
rioting that followed his appear-
ance on the campus last Sunday,
Meredith ate breakfast and lunch
in the school cafeteria and went
through his round of classes.
Shot Heard
The report of shots fired at an
Army vericle carrying three or four
soldiers came in just as the school
day was nearing its end.
Nobody was hurt. FBI agents
began an investigation.
First reports from soldiers said
five shots were fired. But a later
report said only one shot was
heard.
The report of gunfire was the
first since the rioting on the cam-
pus Sunday night and in the town
square Monday.
Earlier, federal troops withdrew
all road blocks except those on the
campus gates. The action was in-
terpreted then as a sign of eas-
ing tensions in the desegregation
crisis.
Still under the guard of federal
marshals remembering the night
of rioting that followed his ap-
pearance on the campus last Sun-
day, Meredith ate breakfast and
lunch in the student cafeteria and
went through his round of classes.
A crowd of studentsjammed in-
to a narrow hallway and booed
and hissed Meredith
Truman Aide
Defends Deal
WASHINGTON (P) - A former
Truman administration official
said yesterday the government's
nickel deal with Hanna Mining
Co. was "objectionable," but the
best that could be made under the
pressure of the Korean War.
Jess Larson, former administra-
tor of the defense materials pro-
curement agency, put it this way:
"'he overriding and crucial need
for additional nickel production
left me no alternative except to
pay a higher price to a producer
outside the boundaries and out-
side the control of the United
States."
The contract was signed Jan. 16,
1953. A few days later, Larson
went out of, office and Hanna's
top executive, George M. Hum-
phrey, became secretary of the
Treasury in the new Eisenhower
administration.
Larson told the Senate Stock-
pile Investigating Subcommittee
the Hanna Co. took a firm, un-
yielding position during the six
months of negotiations.

JAMES MEREDITH-Officials reported that, despite some gun-
fire, tension in Oxford, Miss. was easing yesterday. However, U.S.
marshals continued to guard Meredith. It was reported that he
would leave Oxford this weekend, perhaps to see his wife.
CENSURE MOTION:
De Gaulle Ignores Crisis
Over Por pidou Ouster
PARIS p)--With lofy disdain, French President Charles de Gaulle
took no official notice yesterday of France's political crisis.
The National Assembly defeated Premier Georges Pompidou on a
motion of censure in the 'early morning hours. But de Gaulle went off
to, watch military maneuvers in eastern France without bothering to
accept the premier's resignation.
To Receive Pompidou
A spokesman at the Elysee Palace said de Gaulle will receive
Pompidou today. Later he will talk to the presidents of the National

On Clemson
Negro Asks Entrance
To All-White School
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (P)-Imme-
diate admission to Clemson Col-
lege was denied yesterday to a
Negro student seeking court ac-
tion for transfer to the all-white
institution in South Carolina.
Instead of granting Harvey B.
Gantt, 19, immediate entrance, the
United States Fourth Circuit Court
of Appeals, in effect, held up a
decision. It said the case should
be tried soon on its merits in a
lower court.
The order was issued after Gantt
appealed a United States District
Court decision denying his move
for a preliminary injunction to
gain immediate admission. The
injunction was denied by Judge
C. C. Wyche of U.S. District Court
for Eastern South Carolina.
Now a Student
Gantt now is a student in archi-
tecture at Iowa State University
of Science and Technology at
Ames.
The Appeals Court, in its order
yesterday, said it expects attor-
neys for Gantt and the college will
cooperate in applying to the Dis-
trict Court for a prompt trial,
preferably within 15 days.
The court added that "any ap-
peal will be ready to be heard not
later than the first day of the Jan-
uary, 1963, term of this court and
finally concluded before the open-
ing of the second semester of the
college, about Feb. 1, 1963, without
o b s t a c l e to the appellant's
(Gantt's) matriculation at the be-
ginning of that school semester,
should he prevail (win his case)."
For the Case
The Appeals Court order said
assurances have been given by
counsel for Clemson that the case
can be conveniently heard on the
merits in the district court at an
early date.
Court aides said yesterday's or-
der neither affirms nor denies the
lower court decision. The appeal
to the higher court involved only
the denial of the preliminary in-'
junction Gantt had asked in order
to enter Clemson at once.
Attorneys for the college argued
Thursday that the case should be
sent back to the U.S. district court
for trial on its merits.
Gantt's attorneys argued that,
although classes started during
September at Clemson, the Negro
student should be given a choice
of entering now or waiting until
the next semester.
House Endorses
U.S. Berlin Stand
WASHINGTON P)-The House
adopted, 311 to 0, yesterday a res-
olution recording congressional
support for any action "including
the use of arms" to uphold allied
rights in Berlin. The resolution is
similar in wording and intent to
the one backing a firm stand in
Cuba.

Pork. Barrel
Bills Delay
Legislators
WASHINGTON ()-Wrangling
over pork barrel legislation plus
maneuvers for a pension plan yes-
terday killed hopes for congres-
sional adjournment this week.
But the two biggest remaining
measuresywere untangled from
controversy.
Senate Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield (D - Mont) obtained
unanimous consent for the Senate
to skip today's session-once plan-
ned as the windup-and to meet
again on Monday. The House went
ahead with plans for today's ses-
sion in order to act on the foreign
aid money bill.
How Many Days
Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R-NY)
asked Mansfield how many more
days Congress might stay in ses-
sion. The Democratic leader re-
plied that it might extend "any-
where from next Tuesday to next
Saturday or beyond."
House passage, 312 to 20, sent
to President John F. Kennedy a
bill to hike postal rates, including
a penny boost for regular and air-
mail letters and postcards and to
raise the pay of 1.6 million gov-
ernment workers an average 10 to
11 per cent.
House Conferees
An agreement by Senate-House
conferees on a $3.9 billion foreign
aid bill cleared the way for ex-
pected passage. A final session
ironed out a compromise giving
the President a freer hand than
the House voted earlier to aid
Yugoslavia and Poland and na-
tions whose ships carry supplies to
Cuba.

EXPELLED FROM RUSSIA:
U.S. Attache 'Caught' Spying

MOSCOW (P)-The Soviet Union
yesterday charged the assistant
United States naval attache, Cmdr.
Raymond D. Smith, with spying,
and ordered him to get out of Rus-
sia.
Smith was accused of espionage
"through observation of military
jects" during a visit to Leningrad.
The Soviet government newspa-
per Izvestia and television played
up a picture purporting to show
him "caught in the act" of pho-
tographing a naval installation. He
was shown dressed in civilian
clothes with a camera slung
around his neck.
He Was Caught
"That is how he was caught,"
Izvestia wrote.
Smith declined comment and
began packing his bags.
Seeks Recall
Of Legislature
LANSING (P) - Gov. John B.
Swainson has appealed to Repub-
lican legislative leaders to sum-
mon the Legislature back from re-
cess to act on appropriation of
special funds to fight Japanese
beetle infestation in Monroe and
Lenawee Counties.
The governor said the United
States Department of Agriculture
has offered up to $250,000 to fight
the infestation which some agri-
cultural officials have described
as "critical."
To obtain the federal assistance
the state would have to provide
matching funds which, Swainson
said, are not now available with-
out special legislative action.

The State Department accused
Russia of roughing up Smith in
Moscow and using "strongarm
stuff" while holding him on spy
charges.
The Department rejected So-
viet allegations of improper be-
havior by Smith, but said he will
leave Moscow Monday in compli-
ance with Russian demands.
Press Officer Lincoln White told
newsmen the incident appeared to
be in retaliation for the recent
expulsion of two members of the
Soviet delegation in New York.
Ordered Out
Two members of the Russian
delegation to the United Nations
were ordered out of the United
States last week on charges of
buying military secrets from a U.S.
sailor.
Smith was seized in Leningrad
and forcibly detained for several
hours. The Russians said he was
"caught in the act" of photo-
graphing a Soviet naval institution.
The State Department said the
U.S. embassy in Moscow, to which
Smith was assigned last March,
had "strongly protested to the

SUMMER JOBS in EUROPE
3000 OPENINGS-RESORT, FARM, OFFICE, FACTORY, HOSPITAL,
CONSTRUCTION, CHILD CARE, CAMP COUNSELING, AND MORE
THROUGHOUT EUROPE. WAGES FROM ROOM AND BOARD TO
$175 A MONTH. COMPLETE PACKAGES WITH TOURS FROM 6
TO 24 DAYS-COSTING FROM $150 (not including Trans-Atlantic
transportation) to $799 (including round trip jet flight).
TRAVEL GRANTS AWARDED FIRST 1000 APPLICANTS
See your Placement Officer or Student Union Director or send 20 cents
for complete 20-page Prospectus and Job Application to:
DEPT. N, AMERICAN STUDENT INFORMATION SERVICE,
22 Avenue de ta Liberte, Luxembourg City, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg

Ministry of Defense this gross
violation of diplomatic immunity."
The Soviet government newspa-
per Izvestia published two pic-
tures purporting to show Smith
photographing warships in Len-
ingrad. The same pictures were
displayed on television.
One showed Smith surrounded
by five men and a woman-ap-
parently Russians. The bespect-
acled naval officer wore a light
raincoat, with a camera hung
around his neck. One of the Rus-
sians appeared to be grabbing his
arm and leading him off. In the
background were what looked like
superstructures of ships.
Expect To Find
Khrushchev at UN
WASHINGTON (P)-West Ber-
lin Mayor Willy Brandt said yes-
terday he and President John F.
Kennedy "take it for granted"
that Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev probably will visit the
United Nations in New York this
autumn.

I

cc )ME

to

r~i- Ci.l

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate
confirmed by voice vote yesterday
President John F. Kennedy's nom-
ination of A. Leon Higginbotham
Jr., a Philadelphia lawyer, to be
a member of the Federal Trade
Commission. He is a Negro, the
first of his race to be named to a
federal regulatory commission.
ROME-The first of a contin-
gent of Protestant observers arriv-
ing for the historic second Vatican
Council yesterday expressed confi-
dence it will bring greater coop-
eration among all Christians.
* * s
WASHINGTON --The United
States touched off yesterday one
of the biggest nuclear tests in its
current series beneath the Nevada
desert, the Atomic Energy Com-
mission announced.
DIJON, France-Nine persons or
more were killed and about 10 in-
jured last night when a fast Mil-
an-Paris train crashed into a
freight train.
LUONG, Viet Nam-Communist
guerrillas threw a vicious counter-
punch at a government task force
of more than 1,000 troops yester-
day, killing a United States heli-
copter crewman and crippling an
entire company of Vietnamese
Raiders; the government claimed
100 guerrillas were slain.
NEW YORK-Cornelius Drum-
mond ,a veteran of 16 years in the
United States Navy, was indicted
yesterday on federal charges of
selling a vast and varied store of
the nation's defense secrets to So-
viet Russia.

*Assembly and the Senate. After
these consultations - required by
the constitution-the president is
expected to dissolve the Assembly
and call for a national election.
De Gaulle's trip to the fall ma-
neuvers of the French army was
set long before the crisis winds
started blowing in the Assembly.
He visited command posts in the
maneuver area and then went to
a critique at the artillery school in
Chalons-Sur-Marne.
In the pre-de Gaulle era, presi-
dents roused themselves from bed
to accept the resignations of de-
feated premiers. But de Gaulle,
who has been trying to shake
France out of many of its old hab-
its, is not one to be bound by
custom. He left word that he did
not want to be disturbed by the
outcome of the Assembly's noc-
turnal deliberations. He got the
news after he got up for breakfast.
Certainly Will Dissolve
Sources close to de Gaulle said
he certainly will dissolve the As-
sembly. .The two-round election
of new deputies probably will be
set for Nov. 4 and Nov. 11.
This would mean that French-
men would be asked to go to the
polls on three successive Sundays.
Sunday, Oct. 28 already has been
set for a referendum on de
Gaulle's proposal for election of
future French presidents by pop-
ular vote. Approval of this would
mean a change in the Fifth Re-
public's constitution.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION

U iHE

fh% A r~

the

306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL.
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School
7:b0 p.m. Student Guild
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
9:30 Guild House at 802 Monroe
9:30 Study Seminar at Guild House
10:45 Worship
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Woshtenaw at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
The sermon topic for Sunday, Oct. 7, will be:
"The Contribution of the Church to Juve-
nile Delinquency."
Church School and Worship Services at 9:30j
and 11:00 a.m.j
Student Group: 7:30 p.m.
FIRESIDE FORUM
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
for single young adults
Meetings in First Methodist Church
in Youth Room
Sunday-7:30 p.m.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH......
World Wide Communion both 9:30 and 11: 00
a .m,
"GIVE US THIS DAY OUR DAILY BREAD," Dr.
Fred E. Luchs.
Reception of new members at 9:30 a.m.
Church School: Crib through ninth grade, 9:30
and 11:00 a.m.
Student Guild Program, 802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m.Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday at 8:00. Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00, Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday
at 8:00.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate

SUNDAY
Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Worship Service
munion.

and Com

_-----

r7

Have your

10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
11:00 a.m. Worship Service.
7:00 p.m. "Art in the Modern Church"-
Wayne Huber, speaker.
Wednesday: 7:15-7:45 p.m. Midweek Devo-
tions.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Woshtenaw Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckordt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
John G. Malcin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School-
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756
ALI~b3 a04%e C31ULICW 1CTtr

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship. "Be-
yond Provincialism to Peace," sermon by
Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast 11:00 to 12:15,
WOIA, AM and FM.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar, Pine Room. Series sub-
ject, "Encounters With Other Living Re-
ligions." Topic: "Judaism."
7:00 p.m. - WORSHIP AND PROGRAM,
Wesley Lounge. Topic: "Elections Issues."
Speakers: Steve Stockmeyer, State Presi-
dent of Young Republicans; Paul Heil,
State Executive Board of Young Demo-
crats, and Mrs. John Holmes, League of
Women Voters.
MONDAY
8-11 p.m. Open House at Jean Aobe's Apart-
ment.
TUESDAY
12:00 Noon - Wesley Fellowship Cabinet
Luncheon, Pine Room.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-HOLY COMMUNION. Chapel.
"Interpretation of the Apostle's Creed."
Followed by breakfast, Pine Room. Out
by 8 o'clock.
4:00 p.m.-COFFEE HOUR, Wesley Lounge.
5:10 p.m.-HOLY COMMUNION, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-GRAD SUPPER, Pine Room. For
reservations call NO 8-6881.
THURSDAY
7:00 p.m.-KAPPA PHI, Youth Room.
Wesley Foundation Retreat date is Oct. 19-21.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Tel.: 663-5560
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:15: Services, with
sermon by Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, "Life's
Alternate Routes."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:45: Bible Classes.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper-Program. New mem-
bers are to come at 5:15 for G.D. orien-
tation, with candlelight ceremony receiv-
ing new members after the supper.
Monday at 8:00: Church Membership Class.
Interested persons may still enroll in the
course.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.: Midweek Devotion.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY-
Coffee Hour.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service.
SUNDAY EVENING--
6:45 to 8:00 - American Baptist Student

Prescri ptios
on file at
The
VILLAGE APOTHECARY
OPEN 9 A.M. 'til 11 P.M.
CLOSED SUNDAYS

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