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October 06, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-06

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1962

DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL:
Panel Describes Ideal School

Band Dons New Duds

Hallvig Describes Swedish,
Journalism Needs, Trends

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An eager and able student body,
a faculty which excels at both re-
search and instruction, backed
with administrative and public
support are the basic components
of a great university, a faculty
panel decided yesterday at the
first meeting of the Development
Council Conference.
Associate Dean James H. Rob-
ertson of the literary college con-
sidered the University's student
body. "The quality and stature of
the student is the criterion that
counts and the University passes
this best with high honors," he
said.
However, to retain a top student
body, the University must be "less
tentative and less modest; we must
broaden our concept of scholar-
ship practices," Dean Robertson
added.
Small College Atmosphere
He also noted the problem of
maintaining a small college at-
mosphere, necessary to stimulate
intellectual excitement, on a large
campus. He said the University,
because it is composed of aca-
demic units in which people are
close, can maintain this atmos-
phere while retaining the diversity
of a large school.
Prof. John S. Brubacher of the
education school emphasized that
"if any one fact makes for the
greatness of a university, it is the
excellence of the faculty."
He stressed the need to train
people to be teachers. Practical
application of new discoveries in

the learning process can be "the
difference between mediocrity and
greatness," he commented.
Intellectual Environment
Also, a good faculty is attract-
ed by the intellectual environ-
ment, composed of both faculty
and students who are stimulating,
he noted.
Good students must be admit-
ted, which means "we musn't pre-
fer students on the basis of their
geographic origin," Prof. Bru-
bacher remarked.
"To do so is penny-wise and
pound-foolish. The taxpayer must
remember he is an American as
well as a Wolverine," he added.
Contribution of Research
Dean Stephen Spurr of the nat-
ural resources school discussed
the contribution of research to the
teaching function. "Too much un-
relieved teaching tends to run the
human battery down. The role of
research is to provide constant
recharging of the battery."
Dean Spurr noted two pitfalls
when teachers do research. First,
the research may totally eclipse
the teaching function, if it goes
too far.
Second, a faculty member may
be trapped by the dull, routine
aspects of research, so his "bat-
tery" is not recharged.
Prof. Merritt Chambers, visiting
professor in the education school,
viewed university greatness in a
statewide perspective.
He emphasized the necessary co-
operation between the school, its

alumni and its taxpayers, and de-
clared that taxpayers must recog-
nize the need for a great univer-
sity to be autonomous from gov-
ernment control.
Prof. Chambers stressed this
with respect to out-of-state stu-
dents. "Provincialism is incom-
patible with excellence," he re-
marked, calling for a "cosmopoli-
tan atmosphere."
Wallace Notes
Music School
Developments
By LOUISE LIND
Speaking on the topic "Toward
a Greater School of Music," "a
subject I think of during all my
waking hours and some of my
sleeping hours," Dean James B.
Wallace of the music school ad-
dressed the Ninth Annual Con-
ference of the University Develop-
ment Council yesterday.
On Sept. 7 the University began
construction of the new Music
School building on the west side
of North Campus. The building, to
be completed by the summer of
1964, will replace the 13 "totally
insufficient units" presently used
by the school. The music school
is one of the two largest in the
country with over 700 music ma-
jors and 76 faculty members.
"The construction of a new cen-
ter to train music majors and
provide non-majors with a rich-
er cultural experience will prove
that our policies and declarations
are not just idle words," Dean
Wallace said.
"Many of our needs will continue
to rbe financial. We must provide
the greatest performers andschol-
ars, in the best professional sense,
as possible. We cannot build a
school on a loose association with
the scholar and performer. We
must have him continue his pro-
fessional activity while teaching
students," he recommended.

NEW BAND UNIFORMS-The University Marching Band will
wear its new uniforms at today's game. Gregory Munson, Grad,
models the midnight blue outfit, accented by white gloves, spats
and black-trimmed hats, which the band itself designed. The
sousaphone that Munson holds is one of the 12 all-white light-
weight plastic instruments being used for the first time this
year. The band has also added new drums, to complete its
renovation.
CLINICAL TRAINING:
Medical Society Chooses
Gran Rapds for School
Grand Ra@

By STEVEN HALLER
The Swedish people hold a very
positive and sympathetic attitude
toward the United States, Ivar
Hallvig, managing director of the
Swedish Association of Newspaper
Publishers, said Wednesday.
Hallvig, visiting here on a lead-
ership grant, added that he was
very interested in problems in-
volved in recruiting people for
positions with newspapers. More
and more, the trend is for pub-
lishers of large metropolitan news-
papers to come to university cam-
puses as "talent scouts" rather
than wait for interested graduates
to contact them, he said. He
cited as a reason for this pheno-
menon the growing competition
from television and other media.
Hallvig praised such "talent
scouting" as one which he felt his
country could also benefit from.
"Publishers -in many countries
have not sufficiently followed up
their initial contacts with uni-
versity students," he went on.
Limited Influence
Questioned about the status of
Communism in Sweden, Hallvig
said that Communism had a very
limited influence at the polls and
elsewhere. He explained that the
three major political parties in
Sweden were the Social Demo-
crats, the Conservatives and the
Liberals, with the Center Party
(the old Farmers Party) a poor
fourth, and the Swedish Commun-
ist Party lagging still further be-
hind.
Commenting further on the So-
cial Democrat Party, which is, by
far the largest political party in
Sweden, Hallvig explainedthat a
comparison between the Social
Democrats and our own Demo-
cratic Party is difficult because
of the many "different kinds of
Democrats." However, it is a "typ-
ical Swedish compromise party"
and is quite liberal.
Swedish newspaper circulation
is higher than many Americans
realize, Hallvig continued, for
Sweden is second only to Great
Britain in the number of papers
sold per individual. Some 150
concerns operate a total of 200
newspapers in Sweden; with a
weekday circulation of some 4
million. This is an impressive set
of statistics for a country the
size of Sweden.
Recent Controversy
Concerning the recent thalido-
mide controversy which caused
Mrs. Sherri Finkbine to visit
Sweden seeking an abortion, Hall-
vig replied that the general atti-
tude of the Swedish press toward
her plight was a favorable one.
"Most newspapers found it quite
natural that she tried to get such
an opportunity," he went on. Edi-
torials were very well-balanced
for the most part, although there
were a few which saw the chance
to play up the story in a "sensa-
tional" style, he added.

Hallvig noted that Swedish stu-
dent newspapers are not subject
to censorship. He added that it
was good to see this in a campus'
newspaper, for "it gives the stu-
dents a chance to argue and dis-
cuss the issues."
WMU Enrolls
Record High
KALAMAZOO-Western Michi-
gan University has a record fall
term enrollment of 11,117 stu-
dents, registrar Clayton J. Maus
announced yesterday.
The enrollment showed a seven-
teen per cent increase over the 9,-
545 students enrolled last year,
the largest gain being in the grad-+
uate school. This school enrolled;
1,305 students this year compared;
with the 992 enrolled last year.

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Faculty Opens
Wilson Prize
Nominations
Competition is currently under-
w ay for 1,000 first-year graduate
study awards offered by the Wood-
row Wilson National Fellowship
Foundation for the 1963-64 aca-
demic year.
Faculty members will have untfi
Oct. 31 to nominate candidates for
the awards. All nominees will be
notified by the Wilson Founda-
tion's regional chairman to re-
turn an information form after
receipt and to file other creden-
tials no later than Nov. 20.
Names of nominees should be
submitted to Dean Richard Armi-
tage, Graduate School, The Ohio
State University, 164 West 19th
Avenue, Columbus 10, Ohio.
Last year 110 University stu-
dents were nominated for Wilson
scholarships. Of these, 20 were
awarded Fellowships and 14 re-
ceived honorable mentions.

NEWMAN CLUB
sponsors:

A COMMUNITY BREAKFAST
Sun., Oct. 7, after 9:30 Mass
guest speaker:
FATHER WILLIAM SHERZER
from Sacred Heart Seminary, Detroit

Topic:

ECUMENICAL COUNCIL
331 Thompson St.

CORRECTION

By MYRNA ALPERT

In yesterday's Disc
THE SOUND OF

Shop Advertisement,

MUSIC

Original

Cast

Recording should have been priced at $3.99.

Also,

Stereo prices slightly

higher

than

those listed.

,,flIll a~lhlj~1lii Dial 2-6264
f "' Ilp lu
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STARTING
SUNDAY

* ENDING TODAY *'
"TARZAN GOES TO INDIA"
and "THE TARTARS"

A resolution recommending that
"immediate plans be made to uti-
lize the existing facilities in
Grand Rapids for the training of
medical students in their clinical
years" was passed by the Michigan
State Medical Society at its meet-
ing last week.
The resolution further explains
that Grand Rapids was chosen as
the site for this school because of;
its large size, expanding popula-
tion, and existing facilities that
include three general hospitals
with 1500 beds and approved
training programs in the special-
ties, plus six additional support-
ing hospitals.
Such a medical training pro-
gram in Grand Rapids might com-
plement the two year graduate
school in human biology and med-
icine that will be built at Michi-
gan State University. The clinical
years include the last part of the
second year and continue on
through the remainder of the
medical training program.
The Society has taken this stand
because it recognizes the need for
Michigan to increase its medical
training facilities in order to
maintain the proper relationship
between the percentage of all doc-
tors being trained here as com-
pared with the percentage of the
total United States population in
this state.

In its policy on the supply of
doctors of medicine in Michigan,
the Society recognizes that from
14-20 new medical schools must
be established in the nation in
the next 15 years to produce the,
number of doctors needed by an
expanding population.
Furthermore, it "takes no stand
as to the location of a third medi-
cal school in Michigan, but does
offer its assistance to any legiti-
mate and ethical organization
working toward increasing medical
graduates in Michigan that seeks
its help." Grand Rapids is its
suggestion for fulfilling this
qualification.
"It is of great importance that
early consideration be given to
the problem of increasing the sup-
ply of medical doctors by all those
persons who are interested in this
matter. This is particularly true
in view of the fact that we can
expect 10 years to elapse between
the date of the authorization for
new facilities and the graduation
of the first class for a new medical
school," a society spokesman ex-
plained.

11

S.GoC.
i i
TONIGHT and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
RESNAIS'
HIROSHIMA, MON AMOUR
, Emmanuelle Riva, Eyi Okada.
SHORT: D. W. Griffith's Broken Ways, with
Blanche Sweet, Henry B. Walthall, Harry Carey.
Next week -DANNY KAYE in
"KNOCK ON WOOD"
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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Buy
NIKON &
NIKOREX
Cameras and
Accessories
at
PHOTO DEPARTMENT
State St. at N. University

Directed by Pierre-Dominique Gaisseau . Assisted by
Gerard Delloye - Produced by Arthur Cohn and Rend LaFuite
COLOR and Widescreen - An Embassy Pictures Release
"CAN BE PROUD OF ITS OSCAR!"
-ROSE PELSWICK, N.Y. Journal American

e

The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the University of
Michigan for which 'The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial respon-
sibility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564
Administration Building before 2
p.m. two days preceding publication.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6
Day Calendar
9:30 a.m.-University of Michigan Devel-
opment Council Conference
- Panel, Michael Radock,
John Tirrell, and Allan Mc-
Carthy, "That Extra Effort
for Greatness": Michigan
Union.
1:30 p.m.-Football, U-M vs. Army, Sta-
dium.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild - Em-
manuelle Riva and Eyi Oka-
da, "Hiroshima"; Short,
Blanche Sweet and Henry B.
Walthall, "Broken Ways":
Architecture Aud.
6:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Professional Theatre
Program - Rosemary Harris
and Will Geer, "School for
Scandal": Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
DIAL 5-6240

General Notices
The First Meeting of the Women's
Research Club will be held on Mon., Oct.
8, at 8:00 p.m., in the E. Conference
Rm. of the Rackham Bldg. Mrs. Ilene H.
Forsyth will speak on "Cult Statues of
the Virgin in the Early Middle Ages."
Subsequent meetings willl be on the
first Mon. of the month.
Botany 101 Final Exam make-up will
be given on Thurs. evening, Oct. 11 at
7:00 p.m. in Room 2004 N.S.
Fall Semester Fees: At least 50 per
cent is due and payable on or before
Oct. 8, 1962. Non-payment by Oct. 8
will result in the assessment of a de-
linquent penalty of $5.00.
German Make-Up Examinations will
be held Wed., Oct. 10, 7-9 p.m. in Rooms
1088 and 1092 Frieze Bldg. Please reg-
ister in German Dept. Office by Tues.
noon, Oct. 9.
(Continued on Page 5)
DIAL 8-6416
CONTINUOUS TODAY
FROM 1 P.M.

TONIGHT AT 6 P.M.
LAST TIME TOMORROW-MATINEE 3 P.M.

THE UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM

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Proudly Presents .. .

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7I~e I j th Ic li/

icie tq

announces
200 subscriptions available for its Fall series

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PERSONAL CINEMA
A series of films illustrating the concept of the motion picture
as the expression of the artist's personal vision.
October 8
JEAN RENOIR'S
THE GOLDEN COACH
In a film inspired by the Italian commedia dell'arte, the creator
of RULES OF THE GAME, THE GRAND ILLUSION, and PICNIC
ON THE GRASS seeks the line dividing art from life. Anna
Magnani stars, in what may be her finest performance.
October 29
F. W. MURNAU'S
NOSFERATU

On the road to riches
.. it's a Sellers' riot
all the way!

APA
(ASSOCIATION OF PRODUCING ARTISTS)
IN
by RICHARD BRINSLEY SHERIDAN
Directed By- S
Ellis Rabb
"SUPERB!"
-Det. Free-Pres
'/r= ;

December 10
D. W. GRIFFITH'S
BROKEN BLOSSOMS
Certainly the most personal, and perhaps the greatest, of the
films by the creator of BIRTH OF A NATION and INTOLERANCE.
Starring Lillian Gish.
January 14
JEAN COCTEAU'S
LES PARENTS TERRIBLES
Tangled family relationships examined with overwhelming in-
tensity by one of the most individual of all film makers.
LUIS BUNUEL'S
LAND WITHOUT BREAD
Technically a documentary, this film by the creator of LOS

Y- r
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Rita Tushingham
Winner Best Performance Award
Cannes Film Festival 162
Murray Melvin
Winner Best Performance Award
Cannes Film Festival 1962
Winner of 4 British Academy Awards
"Words Are Completely
Insufficient To Express
Tka Tir'ii flin lf And

A poetic evocation of the supernatural by the creator of The
LAST LAUGH and SUNRISE. In a recent poll of French film
critics, Murnau was selected as the greatest director in the history
of cinema.

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