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September 18, 1962 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'TEMBER 18, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICWTEAN IIATT.

PAGE FIVE

;'

/ -ur' "rAk -ow -r a

U' Visiting Professor Gains
Fame for Work in Classics

Prof. William Arrowsmith of the
University of Texas, whose trans-
lations are published in hard cov-
er editions by the University Press,
has recently been introduced by
Life Magazine as one of the Red-
Hot Hundred.
In a six-page foldout gallery of
young leaders in the Sept. 14 is-
sue of Life, Arrowsmith, who
teaches classics, is called "a lead-
er of a movement seeking a new
approach to classics beyond that
of both pedants and popularizers.
Arrowsmith, who was back as a
visiting professor at the University
this summer, is among the best
known translators of ancient
Greek and Latin works today. At
38, he looks as if he might be a
football coach or a business execu-
tive instead of a scholar. He stud-
'ied Japanese at the University
from 1943-45.
Fresh Language
His translations of such famous
Works as the "Satyricon" of Petro-
nius and -plays by Euripedes and
Aristophanes, re-created in fresh
language marked by a skillful fa-
maliarity, have earned him criti-
cal praise.
He is editor of "The Complete

Greek Comedy," a series of new
verse translations being published
by the University Press which will
include all 11 plays of Aristophanes
and the recently discovered "Dys-
kolos" of Meander.
The classicist is looking forward
to his third trip to Italy for work
and study. He will go on leave
from his regular post as professor
of classics at the University of
Texas.
. His work in Italy will provide a
kind of "intellectual convales-
cence," Arrowsmith says.
Life Fragmented
"Even when one works eight to
12 hours a day, university life
often is fragmented into teaching,
committee work, office hours and
coffee breaks which cause time
to go by without very much to
show for it," he points out.
Arrowsmith feels that the mod-
ern Roman shares the "essentially
pagan attitude" of the early Rom-
ans, which. perhaps helps to ex-
plain the familiar flavor of his
translation of the "Satyricon," a
satire on Roman foibles written in
the time of Nero, and sometimes
called the world's first novel.

Gerard Gets
Dutch Prize'
At Leide n
Prof. R. W. Gerard of the medi-
cal school was awarded anhonor-
ary degree of doctor of medicine
by the University of Leiden (Hol-
land), in ceremonies there yester-
day.
The presentation was the second
honorary doctor of medicine de-
gree to be conferred by the univer-
sity during its three century his-
tory. The presentation was at-
tended by members of the 22nd
International Congress of the
Physiological Sciences. Dr. Gerard
had been chairman of one of the

DEARBORN CENTER CONFERENCE:
Legislative Group Sets Defense Research Parley

(Continued from Page 1)

major symposia during its
long session.

week

Earn Grants
At Stanford
Profs. Harold L. Wilensky and
David J. Bordua of the sociology
department and Prof. Arnold S.
Kaufman of the philosophy de-
partment are among 50 scholars
and scientists who have been
awarded fellowships at the Center
for Advanced Study in the Behav-
ioral Sciences, Stanford, Calif.
The 50 fellows will spend the
present academic year at the cen-
ter.
YD's To Hold
First Meeting
The Young Democrats will hold
their first meeting of the semester
at 7:30 pm. tonight in room 3-B
of the Michigan Union.
Principal speaker will be Tom
Payne, Democratic candidate for
Congress from the second congres-
sional district. His campaign man-
ager, Jerry Faye, will speak on
the techniques of precinct cam-
paigning. Alan Cutcher, statewide
chairman of the Young Democrat-
ic Clubs, will brief the group on
statewide Young Democratic proj-
ects.
Southern Eskimo
TV Show Planned
The University television series,
"Accent" will present "The South-
ern Eskimo," the story of the slow
ilization, at 7:15 a.m. Saturday on
WJBK-TV.

possibly cooperate with University
programs.
He said these foundations have
been a significant factor in re-
search expansion on the East and
West Coasts.
The committee, in addition, urg-
ed that the state seek a technical
facility such as Los Alamos atomic
energy installation or the Lincoln
Laboratories of the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
It is unlikely that this sort of
university - operated government
research facility would be located
at the University as the adminis-
tration has had a long standing
policy of not undertaking man-
agement functions.
Gives Reason
"The University is not interest-
ed in operating a management
service," Sawyer said.
Recognizing that more defense
industry is not the dnly approach
to stimulating economic growth,
the committee recommended
changes in current laws to stim-
ulate business growth, specific
proposals to aid the depressed Up-
per Peninsula and studies of ex-
panding publicity about the state's
recruiting structure.
It urged that the Business Ac-
tivities Tax be repealed or revised,
the relief on personal property
taxes in machinery, equipment
and' inventories be rearranged and
legislation giving local government
greater latitude in solving local
revenue problems.
Labor Pains
It also suggested "corrective la-
bor legislation to eliminate gen-
erally accepted abuses."
He predicted that reforms will
be submitted as individual bills
next session so that some changes
may be made.
The committee recommended
that the 1956 banking law be
amended by a new Development
Credit Corporation Act to correct
unworkable and unused provisions.
Banks on Business
The changes would encourage
the creation of small business in-
vestment corporations w h i c h,
Bursley said, were responsible for
developing small business in other
states, especially on the West
Coast.
Research on such legislation is
being carried out by the Upjohn
Institute in Kalamazoo and by the
business administration school.
The committee also called for

RALPH A. SAWYER
... defense research

bills to assist the development
research parks.

of

Bursley expressed his concern
for the depressed Upper Peninsula,
hard hit by the decline of the
mining industry. He emphasized
the need for a geological survey
of "critically depressed" Gogebic
County where two iron mines clos-
ed within the last month,
The survey would indicate new
and different mineral sources, he
said. It would be financed by state
and federal funds.
Support for mineral research by
the Michigan College of Science
and Technology was also stressed
by Bursley. He pointed to Minne-
sota, whose mining industry was
revived by new techniques devel-
oped by the University of Minne-
sota for processing low grade ore.
Other Plans
The committee recommended
that post-high school vocational

and community college education
be expanded in the Upper Penin-
sula.
The committee suggested several
measures to strengthen the state's
economic development machinery.
It urged that the lieutenant gover-
nor be appointed chairman of the
state economic development com-
mission-.
Bursley predicted that this ac-
tion will occur next year as he said
both Gov. John B. Swainson and
his GOP challenger George Rom-
ney favor the proposal.
May Use Daily Competitor
Further study of plans for a
special New York Times supple-
ment on Michigan industry or a
state magazine was suggested by
the committee.
The group also urged added
funds for the Economic Develop-
ment Commission and for research
into state economic growth.
The committee proposed that a
"free port" in the Detroit area be
established. Such a facility would
allow foreign raw materials to be
processed without duties paid until
the final product enters American
commerce,
Copy Other States
Bursley announced that the
committee hopes to visit a "free
port" within the near future, but
that definite plans had not been
arranged. There are six "free
ports" in the United States.
It also suggested the state ac-
quaint foreign countries about its
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shipping facilities and advantages
and that special programs be set
up tobring foreign officials from
Washington. and Ottawa to the
state.
Lastly, the report calls for con-
tinued research and suggestions
from the state's universities and
colleges and private groups and in-
dividuals.
Open Competition
For Fellowships
Competition for the 1,000 first-
year graduate study awards of-
fered by the Woodrow Wilson Na-
tional Fellowship Foundation for
1963-64 is now under way. Fac-
ulty members will have until Oct.
31 to nominate candidates for the
award.

ROBERT S. McNAMARA
. .. defense contracts

a wr d .- . ;de e s e c n t a t

'U' Therapists
To Form Club
The physical therapy club, a new
club for all undergraduates inter-
ested in physical therapy, will hold
its organization meeting at 7 p.m.
tonight in Rm. 1603, University
Hospital.
The meeting will feature a pan-
el discussion to describe similar
clubs at other schools. Therapists
and instructors from the physical
medicine and rehabilitation de-
partment will speak.

CLASSIC TRANSLATOR-William Arrowsmith, of the University
of Texas, has recently been written up as one of Life Magazine's
Red-Hot Hundred. One of the best known translators of the an-
cient classics today, Arrowsmith was a visiting professor at the
University this summer.

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