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December 10, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-10

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THURSDAY: D9CEMBER 10, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREV

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREJI

Officials Believe

ilson

JOHNSON PLEDGES SUPPORT:
Report Calls for Medical Aid

Changes
By The Associated Press u
WASHINGTON - British Prime
Minister Harold Wilson may have W
modified his views toward the in- po
ternationally-manned nuclear sur-
face fleet proposed by the United t
States, American officials believe.
Summing up two days of Wash-
ington talks, Wilson said in a newsS
conference yesterday that he and
President Lyndon B. Johnson have ca
reached a "total identity of views"fa
on how to continue the search for fit
a satisfactory nuclear defense for
the Atlantic Alliance. w
w.
He said his government "is pre- ai
pared to go forward with all pro-
posals." U.S. officials interpreted a
his remarks to mean that the p
British prime minister might have
-Associated Press modified his earlier outright re-
)N, right, told jection of the U.S. project, and it
ent Lyndon B. would consider it as one element a
nr Lyndion B ofrhis broader alliance nuclear c
for formation force.A
guidelines for This force would also include
rlech is shown Britain's bombers and three Po- m
laris-equipped submarines, now H

Views on MLF

ider construction.
Before coming to Washington,
Vilson criticized the American
an, a multi-lateral nuclear force
intly owned by NATO allies in-
rested in the idea, commonly
mown as the MLF.
He said in a House of Commons
peech that it "adds nothing to
Vestern strength, is likely to
ause dissipation of effort in the
Iliance and may add to the dif-
culties of East-West agreement."
At his news conference yester-
ay, Wilson said his opposition
as directed against "any proposal
imed at overriding a U.S. verto."
The prime minister left for
)ttawa shortly after talking to re-
orters.
American Veto
Wilson, informants said, made
clear during his talks here that
ny plan he would agree to must
*ntain an absolute, irrevocable
kmerican veto.
This was expressed in the com-
nunique issued at the White
Souse Tuesday night which said

that an arrangement must be
found "maintaining existing safe-
guards on the use of nuclear
weapons."
Both Wilson and American of-
ficials-the former at his press
conference, the latter in private
remarks-expressed guarded hope
France might be interested in a
new approach to the nuclear de-
fense problem.
French Hostility
France has shown increasing
hostility to the MLF fleet proposal
which French Premier Georges
Pompidou charged recently "could
boil down to a bilateral German-
American accord."
Herve Alphand, the French am-
bassador, immediately poured cold
water on such hopes. Asked by
reporters after a conference with
Secretary of State Dean Rusk yes-
terday morning whether he saw
anything in the British proposals
which would appeal to France, the
diplomat said, "Not that I am
aware of . . . the French position'
is unchanged."

WASHINGTON (-) - President
Lyndon B. Johnson was told yes-
terday that thousands of Ameri-
cans die needlessly for want of
the best medical care available.
In receiving a report from a
presidential commission, Johnson
pledged a concerted drive in Con-
gress and the nation to buttress
federal, efforts against cancer,
heart disease and strokes.
Unprecedented Plans
The commission proposed these
unprecedented programs:
-A system of 60 regional cen-
ters where Americans can get the
best in diagnosis and care for
heart disease. cancer and strokes:
-A network of 450 stations
across the nation where emer-
gency care, diagnosis of heart di-
sease. strokes and cancer can be
provided along with rehabilita-
tion-with patients referred on
for further care:
-A binding together in cooper-
ative arrangement of the health
facilities of communities and uni-
versities.
Unnecessary Death
According to the commission,
"every day men and women are

dying who need not die. Every
hour families are being plunged
into tragedy that need not hap-
pen. Wives are widowed, children
left motherless-not for lack of
scientific knowledge, but for lack
of the right care at the right
time."
The programs proposed by the
23 physicians, editors and busi-
nessmen on the commission would
cost nearly $3 billion over the first
five years-much of it in "federal
seed money" requiring additional
funds from the states.
AMA Non-Committal
The American Medical Associa-

tion said in a statement that fn
had not yet had time to study the
report and had no specific com-
ment. However, it said, if legisla-
tion is introduced to implement
the program, the AMA will react
then.
The AMA has pledged opposi-
tion to all federal intervention in
the field of medical practice.
The 35 recommendations to the
President spell out that those who
can should pay for care at the
medical centers, but that free care
should be provided for the med-
ically indigent.

U'""

Light an d lively leather..
with a fleece-warm lining

BRITISH PRIME MINISTER HAROLD WILSC
reporters yesterday that his talks with Preside
Johnson have been successful in setting objectives
of a nuclear weapons force in NATO and laying
allied consultations. British Ambassador Lord Ha
above with Wilson.

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
North Viet Nam ChargesU.S. Shellings

By The Associated Press
TOYKO - North Viet Nam
charged that three warships oper-
ating under command of United
States and South Vietnamese
authorities shelled one of its
coastal villages yesterday. The al-
leged attack was called the fourth
such military encroachment since
Nov. 25.
The complaint of Ho Chi Minh's
Communist regime was relayed to
the world by news agencies of
Red China and the Soviet Union.
Though U.S. Ambassador Max-
well D. Taylor and South Viet
Nam's leaders are weighing the
idea of revising war strategy to
shut off the flow of Viet Cong
supplies from abroad, there was
no immediate comment from
Saigon.
In Washington, a Defense De-
partment spokesman said, "We
have no knowledge of any such
incident"
WASHINGTON - The Senate
Rules Committee voted yesterday
to call former White House aide
Walter Jenkins for questioning in
the Bobby Baker investigation.
This was disclosed by Sen. John
Sherman Cooper (R-Ky) at the
start of a public hearing after a
4-hour closed-door discussion of
the future course of the Baker
probe.
Earlier in the Baker investiga-
tion, the Democratic majority had
voted down GOP motions to call
Jenkins for questioning about tes-
timony relating to the sale of
advertising time on an Austin,
Tex., television station owned by
Johnson's family.
Cooper, the only Republican
committee member at the meeting,
said that over his objections it
was agreed that the "party girl"
issue raised in the Baker probe
required no further investigation.
Committee Chairman B. Everett
Jordon (D-NC) had said earlier
that additional hearings will be
held after the new Congress con-
venes in January but gave no
details on subject matter.
He gave no immediate word as
to when Jenkins will be called,
or whether the questioning of the
former White House aide will be
public.
p'MERIDIAN, Miss.-Federal law-
yers polished plans yesterdayfor
a preliminary hearing for 19 men
in Mississippi's case of the three
slain civil rights workers.
The 19 will appear before Unit-
ed States Commissioner Esther
Carter here today. The federal
EVERY MONTIH
ill
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Chase Smith ... Dr. Rebecca Liswood
...Justice Arthur Goldberg... Art

government must show "probable
cause" for further legal action on
the charges filed in what the FBI
calls a Klu Klux Klan plot.
Of the 21 men arrested in the
case, 19 are charged with con-
spiracy to interfere with the fed-
eral rights of the slain men. The
others were charged as accessories
after the fact.
Any murder charges in the case
must come from the state, which
had made no move.
* * *
OSLO, Norway-Martin Luther
King said yesterday "there will
be no lunch counter battles any
more" in the civil rights struggle
in the United States.
"What is now needed," he add-
ed, "is a new dynamism of
strength, a grand alliance of the
civil rights movement, the re-
ligious, labor and intellectual
forces to enforce the kind of poli-
tical action that can end de facto
segregation as regards housing,
schools and job opportunity."
* * * .
WASHINGTON-A broad in-
vestigation of the administration
of justice in the federal courts,
including the impact of press,
radio and television, was voted
yesterday by a House judiciary
subcommittee.
The action was taken by a spe-
cial subcommittee set up late last
session to investigate the Depart-
ment of Justice, particularly its
prosecution of Teamsters Union
President James R. Hoffa.
NEW YORK-Sen. Barry Gold-
water (R-Ariz) met two former
Republican presidential candidates
in a summit conference yesterday
and they all agreed GOP unity
could be achieved if opposing fac-
tionts gave a little ground.
Goldwater announced the agree-
ment after talking for an hour
with former President Dwight D.
Eisenhower and former Vice-
President Richard M. Nixon in
Eisenhower's suite in a New York
C HARMS
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hotel.
Nixon and Eisenhower later cit-
ed the unity need.
* * *
SAIGON-Repulsed in a three-
day battle at An Lao, Viet Cong
guerrillas switched to raids and
ambushes at a dozen other places
in central Viet Nam yesterday.
The Viet Cong killed a U.S. in-
fantry officer in an ambush on
highway No. 1 in Phu Yen Prov-
ince, on the South China Sea 230
miles northeast of Saigon.
The rash of minor attacks broke
out after government reinforce-
ments poured in by helicopters
helped a beleaguered garrison turn
back the threat posed by several

hundred guerrillas to the district
headquarters at An Lao in a
mountain valley of Binh Dinh
province, 300 miles northeast of
Saigon.
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla.-A last-
second engine misfire on a Titan
2 rocket yesterday dealt a severe
setback to the Gemini man-in-
space program, postponing the
final unmanned lauching of the
two-man spacecraft until Janiuary.
The National Aernoautics and
Space Administration- also said
the delay will shove the first
manned Gemini flight into the
second quarter of 1965.

Tomorrow at NEWMAN, 7:30 P.M.
FR. RAY ELLIS, Ass't. Director of
The Confraternity of Christian Doctrine
"CHRISTIANITY AND
I COMMUNITY"
Newman Student Association, 331 Thompson
Europe-U.S. Student Exchange
EXPLORE EUROPE
This Summer With OHS Of The
UNIVERSITY OF VIENNA
$66400
For eligibility details mail coupon to:
International Student Exchange
409 Waldron, W. Lafayette, Ind.
Name Telephone
Address
Home Address

Mill } CHALETu
ComfyO Slippers
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I

EVENING EMPLOYMENT
18-35
If you are free from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. four evenings each week and
occasionally on Saturday, you can maintain your studies and still enjoy
a part-time job doing special interview work that will bring an average
weekly income of $52.
If you are neat appearing and a hard worker see Mr. Moskowitz from
1:30-4:00 p.m. at Room 212 Student Activities Building, Monday,
Tuesday or Wednesday. No other times.
We are also interested in full-time employment.

f

306 SOUTH STATE
Open Friday night and all next week until 8:30

7

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802 MONROE
Friday, December 1 1 ... 1-2 Noon
JOSE CHIPENDA
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Support
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FOR
CHRISTMAS

I

Berkeley Students and Faculty
The struggle for free speech at Berkeley is ours too. Freedom of political action and
expression are fundamental democratic rights, and their denial is shocking when it
occurs at a university. The use of police to repress on-campus protest has been es-
pecially objectionable.
Before the controversy, the question of student rights and grievances was effectively
disregarded by university officials. By organizing and acting dramatically on their
grievances, the students and faculty of Berkeley have reversed the situation in which
they were ignored, and have begun work on university reform. We salute them for
their initiative and their demonstration of the power of action in dealing with per-
sistently neglected campus problems.

I

Richard Horevitz
Chairman, VOICE Political Party

Cords

SCandies

I

Wrappings
Decorations,
312 So. State 1203 So. University

Dewitt Baldwin
Prof. Frithjof Bergmann
Prof. Robert Blood
Prof. Richard Brandt
Prof. Samuel Eldersveld
Prof. Marvin Felheim
Prof. Carl Ginet
Prof. Otto Graf
Rev. Robert Hauert
Prof. Arnold Kaufman
Prof. Hyman Kornbluh
Prof. Charles Lehmann
Prof. Shoe Livermore
Thomas F. Mayer
Prof. Leon Mayhew

Prof. Charles Moskos
N. Patrick Murray
Prof. David Norsworthy
Marvin Olsen
Prof. Bradford Perkins
Jerom Rabow
Prof. Richard Soloway
Prof. Richard Schmuck
Elizabeth Sumner
Prof. Thomas Tentler
Prof. Jack Walker
Prof. Richard Wheeler
Prof. E. Thomas Chapman
Prof. Donald Hall
Prof. Marc Pilisuk

..-. u U . A

1
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HURRY!
LAST CHANCE TO BUY A.
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