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December 10, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-10

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I

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1964

ARTS and LETTERS By Adria Schwartz
To Present StudentPlaybill

Experimentation,

The lights will dim on the Arena
Theatre at 4:10 this afternoon and
the shuffling and the muffled
whispers will cease as the Student
Laboratory Theatre presents "In-
troducing Eve" by Susan Vierow,
'64, and "The Name of the Same
is Ben," by Dennis McIntyre, '65.
Soviets Cut
Ar'ms Budget
(Continued from Page 1)
the West are points often attack-
ed by Peking. Kosygin did not re-
fer to the bitter dispute between
the Soviet Union and Red China.
Kosygin said the defense budget
for 1965 would be cut by 500 mil-
lion rubles ($555 million at the
official,:rate). This is 3.76 per cent
less than the 'announced figure of
13.3 billion rubles ($14.8 billion)
for 1964. In Washington, the
Pentagon estimated spending of
$49.5 billion for the fiscal year
ending next July 1.
Understatement
Western analysts consider the
announced figures to show less
than half the true Soviet spending
on defense, much of which is bur-
ied in such budget-items as social
welfare and industrial production.
Kosygin said "representatives of
the United States government
have made appropriate statements
to us" from which: it follows that
Washington intends to cut mil-
itary spending for the next fiscal
year.
Defense -Minister Rodion M1Val-
inovsky, unmentioned publicly
since Nov. 27 and reported on
leave amid speculation that he
might be replaced, was absent.
Another' minister mentioned in
speculation a b o u t government
changes, Culture Minister Ekate-
rina Furtseva, was. on the plat-
form. So was Mikhail Suslov, a
top Communist Party leader re-
cently missing and reported sick.
Stronger UN
Kosygin called for strengthen-
ing the United Nations. He said it
is faced with financial difficulties
"through the fault of Western
powers."
Kosygin's 93 - minute s p e e c h
gave a picture of an economy that
has failed to make as fast pro-
gress as the Communist leaders
sought.
He promised more economic
liberalism -and less rigid central-
ized planning, greater material in-
centives for good work and more
things like refrigerators and tele-
vision sets for the masses.

Sixth in a series of student
productions, this final bill is pro-
duced by the speech department
in conjunction with the play-
writing class taught by Prof. Ken-
neth Rowe of the English depart-
ment. Directed, cast and entirely
produced by students (from design
and construction of sets to Ios-
tumes and lighting, today's bill is
composed of two plays written by
members of Rowe's class.
The lab theatre provides one
of the few opportunities for stu-
dents to produce completely orig-
inal and less well known produc-
tions, in addition to establisned
plays, with the added challenge
provided by theatre-in-the-round.
Student Writing
The last lab bill of each semes-
ter provides the only opportunity
for students in the playwriting
class to see their works performed
and appreciated by a live audi-
ence.
The productions become espe-
cially interesting because of the
lack of a regular prosthemum
stage. The Arena Theatre-a
theatre-in-the-round-adds tre-
mendous complexity to the set
construction, direction and light-
ing. The audience gains benefits,
however, from the reality of the
three - dimensional peiformance,
and their proximity to the actors
and the drama itself.
Adam and Eve
The first play on the bill, "In-
troducing Eve, or, The Seduction
of Adam," is a quasi-comedy
which takes place in the Garden
of Eden before the creation of
Eve. God decides that he should
make a companion worthy of
Adam, who is very pleased with
the idea until he realizes tfiat
woman is to be born of his ovxn,
rib.
Satan then appears and en-
deavors to convince Adam that
women may be a good thing. Fin-
ally the devil succeeds; Adam re-
lents, saying: "Give me woman,
she needs me."
The final irony, according to
Thomas Manning, director of the
lab bill, is "that Satan is working
for God's plan which, by coin-
cidence, fits into his."
"The Name of the Same is
Ben," the second play, takes the
audience to a party thrown by a
group of college students. The pro-
tagonist, Ben Cook, described by,
Manning as a "boorish sort of
character," enters as an uninvited
guest.
Gradually he becomes accepted
as the object of their game of
ridicule, which progresses until
the climactic discovery by the
group of the humanness of even
the lowest of boors.

(Continued from Page 1)
institution. In doing so, they en-
dorsed a plan formulated by a
six-man committee of Flint and
University officials and approved
by the Flint Board of Education.
The Regents asked that the plan
be implemented as soon as possi-
ble and set 1965 as a target date.
Flint will admit its first fresh-
man class next fall.
The Regents specified, in ac-
cordance with the plan, that the
college will be an autonomously-
run branch of the University -
under Regental control but man-
aged by an administrator in
Flint.
Specialized
It will be a four-year liberal
arts college with an initial en-
rollment of 1000 which will ulti-
mately grow to 3000. Its curricu-
lum will place emphasis on such

CURRICULUM-A series of ad-
vances in this area this year saw
the University:!
-Eliminate English 124 as aI
distribution requirement;' g
-Establish a master's degree1
program in medical art, and
-Launch a year-abroad pro-
gram at Germany's Freiburg Uni-
versity in cooperation with Wayne
State University and the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin.
CENTREX - The increasing
complexity of the University
switchboard operations led to the
installation of a direct dialing, or
Centrex telephone system at the1
end of the summer. The Centrex1
system handles over 11,000 tele-
phone numbers and eliminates the
University operator in the process-
ing of regular calls.
Trimester
With the approval of a $44'

Expansion Mar
dward Groesbeck in October will ,B ilding
dd to the smoothness of trimester
y eliminating the use of Water- The University continued its
nan Gym during registration. expansionist philosophy in its
tarting a trial run in February, building program.
he new system, if successful, billi While the new music school
)e initiated on a full-scale basis building on North Campus was
n the fall when students pre - dedicated this fall, the University
"o ifr fr l.rtrifr +r

register for their winter term {
classes.
Help!
Perhaps the only concrete indi-
cation of new pressures brought
with the trimester was the recent
appeal to Heyns made by five stu-
dent leaders. The students asked
that an extended reading period
prior to the final examination per-
iod be included in future academic
calendars.
A point of dispute about the tri-
mester was the scaling of faculty
wages. The faculty, seeking to re-
tain their nine-months' salary for
the compressed eight-month aca-
demic year, asked that professors
working either half of the com-
ing spring-summer term be paid
the same amount they would be
given for working half a fall or!
winter term.
The issue has yet to be resolved
with the administration, which
recommends that faculty working
half the summer term be paid
about 88 per cent of the amount
given for half a fall or winter
term.

"k

1964

looked forward to:
-A $3.5 million, nine-story ad-j
dition to the General Library;
-A $6 million children's hospi-
tal built at the University Medi-
cal Center with funds donated by
Flint's Charles S. Mott Founda-
tion;
-A new literary college struc-
ture, costing an estimated $4 mil-
lion, to be erected adjacent to
Burton Tower on S. Ingalls St.;N
-An $11-13 million dental
school building to be constructed
with state and federal funds;
-A new administration build-
ing designed to free 65,000 square
feet in the present building for lit-
erary college classrooms and of-
fices;
-A $4.9 million University
Events Building to hold 14-16,000
persons attending sports events
and other student entertainment;
and
-Four new housing complexes--}
Bursley Hall, Cedar Bend Hous-
ing I and II and the residential
college-to house an additional

PROF. KENNETH T. ROWE
K Aarni~

specialized areas as engineering million budget appropriation by
science, business administration the state Legislature, the Univer-
and teacher education. sity this term moved into full-
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES scale operations. President Hatch-

3600 students on North Campus by
1968.
New College
Following March approval.by
the faculty of the literary college
and the Regents, the University
continued groundwork on the pro-
posed residential college, a small
(1000-2000 students), liberal arts
college within the literary college
to be built on North Campus by
1967.
Providingboth living and class-
room facilities for its volunteer
student body, the college is aim-
ed at creating an intellectual spirit
nany feel is lacking at the Uni-
versity in its present structure.
The Regents chose Associate
Dean Burton Thuma of the liter-
ary college to plan and direct the
new unit. He has worked toward
this end with a small faculty com-
mittee which will eventually form
the nucleus of the college.
A committee of student advisors
has met with Thuma throughout
the fall semester, conferring on
such issues as housing and living
conditions, curriculum, student or-
ganizations, classroom facilities,
size of the student and faculty
bodies, libraries and selection
Standards for students and faculty.
Gyps
wednesday - saturday
at 8 p.m.
saturday matinee at 2 p.m.
$1.75,2.00, 1.50

'4

.1.-'E. DEPARTMENT-At their Novem-
ber meeting, the Regents voted to
convert the University's interdis-
am pu ciplinary program in communica-
tion sciences into a full-scale lit-j
THURSDAY, DEC. 10 erary college department. They al-
4:10HUmThStde Labo so established a Center for Hu-
4:10P.m.--The Student Labora- man Growth and Development.
tory Theatre will present "In- The communication sciences de-
troducing Eve" and "The Name of Thm utiabscieneschng
the Same is Ben" in the Arena partment will absorb the teaching
Theatre in the Frieze Bldg. and research functions of the
7 p.m.-Dr. Norris Harring, edu- Communications Science Labora-
cational director of the children's tory and will extend the program
rehabilitation unit at the Univer- -currently strictly for graduates
sity of Kansas, will speak on -into the undergraduate curricu-
"Psycho - Educational Procedures lum.
of Emotionally Disturbed Child--
ren" in the Rackham Amphithea-
tre. ad9 - nea 'FPlan Suminmer
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. -- Cinema{
Guild will present Steinbeg's M ath Course
"Anatahon" in Architecture Aud. M t
7:30 p.m.-The junior class of
the women's physical education With support from the National
department will present its annual Science Foundation, the mathe-
modern dance concert. matics department will again of-j
8 p.m.-The Ann. Arbor Civic fer a guided reading program for
Theatre will present "Gypsy" in' 16 ,undergraduates during the
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. summer term III A, from May 3-
8:3 p m.-. - T h e University June 26.

er had set the trimester as a high
priority item on the University
budget request.
The trimester, which brings the
University into year-round oper-
ations, was designed as an an-
swer to the pressures created by'
the post-war "baby boom" on
higher education. It allows a stu-
dent to attend classes year-round
and graduate in three years, if he
wishes, or to attend any combi-
nation of the three terms, annual-
ly. It will ultimately allow the Uni-
versity to accommodate a propor-
tionately larger number of stu-.
dents each year.
The Schedule
The terms are calendared from
August-December January-April
and (in two halves) May-August.
A survey of literary college stu-]
dents taken this fall indicated that
more than 25 per cent of all lit-
erary college students plan to at-
tend one or both half-sessions of
the newly instituted third term.
The transition to trimester was
accomplished with seeming ease.
A plan announced by Registrar
. j.

ENDING
TONIGHT
ws 7 & 9 P M

DIAL
8-6416

Sho%

JnuwS r u 7 r.rvt.

.

"BRILIANT I HILARIOUSI
GAGS. GIGGLES, GUFFAWS AND SATIR~I."
The New York Times:
Pietro Germi's
SEBUCEB and
AWALTERREAYE-STERNG PRESENTATION
FRIDAY: PETER SELLERS IN "THE AMOROUS GENERAL"

I

tickets now:
mendelssohn
reservations:

box office
668-6300

Choir, and Orchestra, conducted
by Maynard Klein, will give a
public concert of Christmas music
in Hill Aud. The free concert has
been an annual event for the past
15 years.

Each student enrolled will re-I
ceive a weekly stipend of $60 plus
tuition and reimbursement for
books. The program carries three
hours of credit, but is to be re-
garded as a full-time commit-

join The Daily
Sports Staff

FRIDAY, DEC. 11 ment; enrollees are not permitted
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Edwin S. Shneid- to take other courses or outside
man of Los Angeles' Suicide Pre- employment during the program
vention Center will address a psy- period.
chological colloquium in Aud. B. Interested students may pick up
His topic is "Some Reflections on application blanks in the depart-
Self Destruction." ment office during the second
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. - Cinema week of January. Applications
Guild will present Sternberg's must be completed and turned in
"Anatahon" in Architecture Aud. by the first of February. Selections
8 p.m.-The Ann Arbor Civic will be announced by the depart-
'Theatre will present "Gypsy" in mental honors committee at the
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. ; end of February.
Today: 4:14 p.m. Promptly
Arena Theatre Frieze Building
TWO ORIGINAL PLAYS
INTRODUCING EVE
by Susan Vierow

DIAL 662-6264
ENDING FRIDAY-,
I, 1

I

......m .......mi......u.....m.............n.inm........m.m.m..u........m....
r S
ANATAHON Tonight and Tomorrow
r
Joseph Von Sternberg's bizarre story of 20 Japanese sailors and a girl u
holding out on a deserted island for 7 years after the surrender of Japan, u
r
iiDIAL 662- 8871
For Program Information
r "
r r
ll
r r
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
rm mADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS m
........ . ............ ............,............ .............~a~r~ra~rr~rwrt er~

DIAL 5-6290 Feature at
Shown Today at _ 1:00-3:10-5:15
1, 3, 5, 7 9 P.M. 7/:15-9:20
KIM NOVAK - LAURENCE HARVEY
IN W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM'S
EXTRA-
TOM £r JERRY "ON THE BOUNCE"
"Snowbody Loves Me" Sport Specialty
Friday: "YOUNGBLOOD HAWKE"
~I
Low and leggy and perfect for the Christmas seasonl Genuine
leather with snuggly nylon fleece lining, crepe soles, bold
stitching down the center, and a smartly squared-off toe ...
an unbeatable combination of practicality and fashionl
t a te

I

I

i
i
ii.
" 1
j
.fa

and
THE NAME OF THE GAME IS BEN
by Dennis McIntyre
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
Student Laboratory Theatre
in cooperation with Professor Rowe's Playwriting
course in the Department of English.

BARBAR4 9PNWYCK F EEAN EIKSM
SNEAK PREVIEW
FRIDAY AT 7:30
REGULAR FEATURE SHOWN
BEFORE & AFTER PREVIEW
CLUE: This Picture was made
entirely without the co-opera-
tion of any Medical Ass'n.!

e ANN ARBOR

ll-

ADMISSION FREE

I

SUBSCRIPTIONS 30%oOFF
4 Mendelssohn Theatre-Mon. thru Fri. 10-1, 2-5

I

SIX CONCERTS
MAY 6, 7, 8, 9
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL SIX CONCERTS
Program Features
THURSDAY, MAY 6, 8:30
LEONTYNE PRICE, Soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Company, will sing Mozart and
Verdi arias. Orchestral works include Beethoven Symphony No. 4 and Stravinsky "Fire-
bird" Suite. EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor.
FRIDAY, MAY 7, 8:30
Benjamin Britten's "Spring Symphony" for soprano, contralto, tenor, chorus, and boys'
choir. Mozart's "Sinfonia Concertante" in E-flat major, for violin and viola. THOR
JOHNSON, Conductor.
SATURDAY, MAY 8, 2:30
SAMUEL MAYES, soloist, in Blochs "Schelomo." Orchestra performs Handel's Suite
from "Alcina" and Dvorak's Symphony No. 4. WILLIAM SMITH, Conductor.
SATURDAY, MAY 8, 8:30
CESARE SIEPI, Bass, of the Metropolitan Opera Company, soloist. EUGENE ORMANDY,
Conductor. (program to be announced).
SUNDAY, MAY 9, 2:30
MAUREEN FORRESTER will sing Chausson's "Poeme de l'amour de la mer." The
Choral Union; Boys' Choir; Tenor soloist; and Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist, will
perform Berlioz' "Te Deum." THOR JOHNSON, Conductor.
SUNDAY, MAY 9, 8:30
SVIATOSLAV RICHTER, Pianist, in Ann Arbor debut, performing Grieg's Piano Con-
certo. Orchestral works: Mozart Symphony No. 30; Moussorgsky-Ravel "Pictures at an
Exhibition." EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor.

4

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