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November 21, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-11-21

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THRET I

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREJI

End of Detroit News Deadlock
Awaits Union Vote on Contract

Strikes Cripple Ford, Threaten Railroads

DETROIT (R)-The longest strike
shutdown of metropolitan daily
newspapers in the nation's history
appeared near an end yesterday.
Tentative agreement on terms
of a settlement of the 131-day
strike against the afternoon De-
troit News and the morning
Detroit Free Press was reached
early yesterday at a secret meet-
ing at Solidarity House, head-
quarters of the United Auto Work-
ers Union.
Although the UAW was not
directly involved in the walkout, a
key role in negotiating the s gree-
ment was played by the union's
president, Walter P. Reuther.'
Reuther Mediates
The UAW chieftain was instru-
mental in bringing together rep-
resentatives of the two newspapers
and local 13 of the striking In-
ternational Pressman's Union to
settle the last remaining issue on
which the two sides were dead-
locked.
This issue involved the sire of
crews needed to man new cignt-
unit presses at the Detroit News,
according to state and federal
mediators who also took part in
the secret meeting. The publishers
had maintained the crew should
not exceed 15 men, while the
union held out for 16.
Union Vote Saturday
Although details of the settle-
ment were withheld officially
pending a union membership rati-
fication vote Saturday, one source
said the compromise called for
16-man crews for a 12-month per-
iod while a study committee looks
into the question.
After nine months, the union
then would have the option of ac-
cepting 15-man crews or sub-
mitting the issue to binding ar-
bitration, to be concluded within'
the 12 months.
The publishers have contended
that impartial studies show eight-
unit presses can be operated with
only 11 to 14 men.
Other provisions of the new

contract call for higher wages, jobi
security clauses, improved pen-1
sions and additional benefits.
Under the old contract, the basic
rate for pressmen for a 37% -
hour work week was $140.
Freeman Fraze, president of
local 13, said the union's negotiat-
ing committee would recommend
acceptance of the contract.I
"However," he cautioned, "this
is not a guarantee that the agree-
ment will be ratified. Ours is a
democratic union and the final
decision will be made by ouri
members."1
Began in July
The strike began last July 13-
first day of the Republican Na-
tional Convention in San Fran-
cisco-when the pressman and'
members of local 10 of the Af-
filiated Plate and Paperhandlers+
Union walked out.
As it dragged on, the nation's
fifth largest city was deprived of
its major source of news through
such events as the Democratic
national convention in Atlantic
City, an important primary elec-
tion for a newly apportioned state
Legislature, the detonation of Red
China's first nuclear device, the
fall of Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev and the re-election
of President Lyndon B. Johnson
and Michigan Gov. George Rom-
ney.
Despite the intervention of the
mayor, the governor, religious and
civic leaders and the President
himself, the strike continued.
Saturday-when the strike is
expected to end officially-will
mark the 131st day the Free Press
and News have 'failed to publish.
Before the Detroit walkout, the
longest previous newspaper shut-
down was a 129-day strike against
the Cleveland Plain Dealer and
the Cleveland Press in 1962-63.
Other Media Expand Coverage
To fill the gap for the news-
starved public, Detroit radio and
television stations expanded their
coverage of news events, and two

interim newspapers were estab-
lished-the Detroit Daily Press
and the Detroit Emergency Press.
Mayor Jerome Cavanagh said
all Detroit residents have been
victims of the strike, not just the
approximately 4,100 employes in-
volved.
"Economically, and perhaps
more important, in knowledge and
communication, the loss has been
serious and irretrievable," he ob-
served.
False hopes of a possible settle-
ment were raised following n(go-
tiating sessions with federal me-
diators last month in Washing-
ton, D.C.
Despite an expressed hope by
President Lyndon B. Johnson for
"favorable action" on a tentative
proposal, the pressmen turned
down the package, 230-17.
*The plate and paperhandlers
finally accepted an agreement on
a new two-year contract Nov. 11.
The proposed settlement with
the pressmen came a day after
Teamster President James R.
Hoffa said in an interview that
teamster truck drivers were ready
to cross the picket lines if the
publishers wanted to use nonunion
help to run the presses.

Locals Blamed
For Stoppage
DETROIT (R')-Ford Motor Co.
auto production was scheduled to
stop last night and the company
blamed a shortage of parts caused
by local United Auto Workers
union strikes.
Negotiations resumed yesterday
at the key Sterling Township,
Mich., parts plant. Top-level ne-
gotiations were scheduled today at
Ford headquarters at Dearborn,
Mich.
The Sterling Township plant
has 6,300 workers on strike. It
makes chassis parts, axles, suspen-
sion parts and drive shafts.
Other struck plants are an auto
assembly plant at Wayne, Mich.,
with 1,900 workers, and a truck
plant at Wayne, with 1,100 work-
ers.

strikes would halt all Ford pro-
duction by next week.
The strikes started Nov. 6 at
nine local plants which had failed
to reach local agreements supple-
menting the national contract.
Agreementhwas reachedcon the
national contract Sept. 18.
The issues were mainly working
conditions, seniority and over-
time.
Agreements later were reached
at all but the three Michigan
plants.
A Ford spokesman said the
Mustang had been the only auto
produced since Tuesday and that
assembly of that car would stop
at the Milpitas, Calif., assembly
plant tonight.
The spokesman said some truck
production would continue, but
probably would halt next week if
no settlement was reached. He
said some parts production also
would continue.
The total number of United
States employes idled by the strike
hit 80,000 today-half of Ford's
hourly worker force.

Craft Unions
Plan Walkout
CHICAGO (P) - Negotiations
aimed at averting a nationwide
railroad strike proceeded at a fast
pace yesterday as the hours nar-
rowed before the 6 a.m. Monday
strike deadline.
A federal mediator was expect-
ed to continue discussions well in-
to the night again in separate
meetings with six shop craft
unions and the nation's railroads.
Francis A. O'Neill of the Na-
tional Mediation Board began the
intensive negotiations Monday, but
no joint management and union
meeting has been held yet.
Refuse Proposals
The six shop craft unions have
turned down a presidential emer-
gency board's proposed 27 cent
hourly pay increase spread over
three years. The unions, reportedly
led by the machinists and sheet
metal workers, have demanded in-
creases of 41 cents hourly.

If called, a strike would halt
service on 187 railroads and ter-
minal switching companies that
handle 90 per cent of the rail
traffic in the country.
Yesterday, Michael Fox, head of
the AFL-CIO railway employes de-
partment and chief negotiator for
the shop craft unions, said "all
plans are made and ready for a
strike at 6 a.m. Monday."
Observe Pickets
Other unions are expected to
observe the picket lines that would
be set up by the shop craft
unions, which are not actually in-
volved in the movement of trains.
The shop craft unions conterd
that their members are under-
paid in relation to other non-
operating rail workers and com-
parable jobs in industry. The rail-
roads contend it would not be fair
to the rest of the industry to
break the uniform wage-package
pattern that now prevails.
Negotiations also are pending
with five other shop craft unions
that represent some 300,000 em-
ployes, but no strike threat has
been issued by those unions.

M. M. (Mike) Cummins,
labor relations director,
Thursday the effects of the1

Ford'
said
three

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World News Roundup
By The Associated Press

S".

RIGHT

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r "
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WALTER REUTHER

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THE CONGO-Congolese troops, led by white mercenaries, push-
ed yesterday to within 180 miles of rebel Stanleyyille where 1,000
Europeans and Americans are being held hostage.
In Brussels, the Belgian government said it is ready to intervene
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the possible mission of rescuing
white rebel-held hostages.
UNITED NATIONS-Secretary-
General U Thant raised the issue " " C I '
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