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November 21, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-11-21

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PAGE TWO

TAE MICHIGAN DAli.V

0 K rilYT"Vlk X tT ' TAKTS'ln RTa1 &V 4 ^ A s

aAGEsTWO T i MJE'uJI}Avt IbAt1i ,

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER1~I 21, 1964

E

DISTINGUISHED FACULTY
Wilhelm Fears Social Apathy_

ARTS and LETTERS By Gail Blumberg
New York Opera: Light Fare

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
last of a series of articles on the
recipients of two University faculty
awards, the Distinguished Faculty
Achievement Award and the Dis-
tinguished Service Award.
By LAUREN SHEPHERD
Prof. Ross Johnson Wilhelm, re-
cent recipient of the Distinguished
Service Award, sees public apathy
as a threat to the democratic way
of life.
"Today there is a far greater
need for an active participation in
society by all groups. If we are
going to have a democracy, we
must have decision-making on the
basis of the information and
opinions of everyone," Wilhelm
said.
Passive Interest
"I feel that teachers and busi-
nessmen, especially, have taken
a passive interest in society, re-
lating their new finds only to
their business associates, and not
to the population at large," he
added.
Because of these beliefs, for the
past four years Wilhelm has given
a weekly five-minute radio com-
mentary called "Business Review"
for WUOM, the campus FM sta-
tion.
His most recent discussion con-
cerned the increase in electronic
eavesdroppers ("snooping gad-
gets") in the business world to-
day.
Closed Society
He attributed this business es-
pionage to the fact that America

is moving toward an undesirable
closed society, with a declining
exchange of ideas between com-
peting business firms.
Wilhelm believes the following
two developments have led toward
this closed society:
-The breakdown of the patent
system, whereby an individual
makes public his inventions; and

on the rise, it is because we are
becoming a closed society and
this is the real change that should
worry us more than the eaves-
dropping itself," Wilhelm said.
Economic Commentary
His radio commentary has also
included discussions on current
business andl economic affairs, the
stockmarket, the war on poverty
and the Peace Corps.
Tapes of his program have been
rebroadcast by more than 100 ra-
dio stations throughout the coun-
try, and newspapers have carried
stories on Wilhelm's suggestions.
In the classroom, he believes it
is the teacher's role to guide the
students in integrating and unify-
ing the ideas contained in the
readings.
"Understanding the role of the
businessman in society and the
functions of the economy requires
an interdisciplinary approach,
drawing concepts and facts from
all of the social sciences and not
just economics and business," he
said.
Understands Values
From the interdisciplinary ap-
proach the student gains a deeper
understanding of the values that
guide the business mind and thus,
also gains insight into his own
values and his own perceptions of
the world, he added.
Wilhelm also participates in sev-
eral special instruction programs
for American businessmen and
visitors from abroad.

The New York City Opera Com-
pany, under the direction of Jul-
ius Rudel, has returned to Ann
Arbor for the third consecutive
season with a selection of operas
in the light, romantic vein.
At 2:30 p.m. tomorrow the com-
pany will perform Franz Lehar's
operetta "The Merry Widow" and
at 8:30 p.m. Charles Gounod's
"Faust," in Hill Aud.
They also presented Johann
Strauss' "Die Fledermaus" last.
night.
Huge Success
"The Merry Widow" has played
to packed houses ever since its
1905 premiere in Vienna. Despite
a highly romantic and barely
credible plot, this operetta has re-
mained a favorite in opera reper-
toire by virtue of its melodic score
and glittering waltz choreography.
It has become a symbol of the
gay andbglamoroussworld of pre-
war Europe.

Widow Waltz," Lehar led the mu-
sical stage away from the march-
es and drills which then predom-
inated, paving the way for the
social dance of the Castles and
the Astaires.

Theatre Lyrique in Paris. Barbier
and Carre were inspired in their
libretto by Goethe's "Faust," us-
ing, however, only the love story
of Marguerite and Faust.
G't]n~ d' r aaaa t*t

Image of Era rsmlnetGohehate
Imae o Er uonoas pera pears so little
According to critic John Keat- resemblance to Goethe that the
ing, "The Merry Widow" summed German opera audience refuses
up "in lilting melodies and an to use the same name, callng the
innocently risque book, the pic- opera 'Margarethe."
ture that the turn of the cen- "Faust" was originally compos-
tury beau monde liked to think ed in the opera-comique form
was the true image of the era"; a with spoken dialogues between
romantic, gay and carefree life musical numbers. Ten years later,
based on a feeling of solidarity at the Paris opera, connecting rec-
and well being. itatives and ballets were added,
Charles Gounod's "Faust" was bringing it to the classic opera
first performed in 1859 at the i form we now see.

s
3
s

APA TOURS MICHIGAN

The Association of Producing Artists left Ann Arbor
Thursday on a tour of Michigan sponsored by the Professional
Theatre Program. The APA company will perform George
Bernard Shaw's "Man and Superman" in Jackson, Coldwater,
Flint and Grand Rapids during the next week. The company
will return to Ann Arbor over the Thanksgiving weekend to
resent s ecial nerfnrmsnn e of 4"Wa d l " dp nt "Tho

PROF. ROSS WILHELM

-The limiting of the practice
of having business employes move
from one firm to another, bring-
ing new ideas with them.
"If electronic eavesdropping is

..................-:.......::'i.'},.w.........ti{:............
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.........".....t:::r""::{:N.. ::......................r::::::.::"r..................... .

pi esem " peri *ances or wa Uan au dZIUaa-l The libretto for "The Merry
Hostage." Widow," written by Victor Leon
and Leo Stein, was based on a
100-year-old comedy, "La Petite
Ville" by Louis Picard. The story
was presented to Lehar when
spusLeon and Stein were unable to
work with their usual collabora-
tor. The impending production,
SATURDAY, NOV. 21 "Night of the Iguana" in the viewed as a certain disaster, was
9 a.m.-The Michigan Intercol- Civic Theater Bldg., 803 W. Wash- only engaged for a six-week run
legiate Speech League Novice ington. as a filler piece.
Tournament will be held in the 7 p.m.-The India Students As- Year Run
Frieze Bldg. sociation will present "Nehru- To everyone's surprise, Lehar's
2 and 8 p.m.-The Gilbert and Man of Two Worlds" and "Nehru work was so successful it ran
Sullivan Society will present "Tri. Passes Away" in the Multi- more than a year. "The Merry
al by Jury" and "The Sorcerer" in Purpose room of the UGLI. idd w sc in all
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. 7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema GuildoftemjrEopacies
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild will present Orson Welles' "Mac- At the time of the New York
will present Orson Wells' "Mac- beth" in the Architecture Aud. opening in 1907, some 100 com-
beth" in the Architecture Aud. 8:30 p.m.-The New York City panies were playing "The Merry
7:30p~m-Th Inda Sudets Opera will present "Faust" in Hill ;Widow" around the world. The
7:30 p.m.-The India Students Opr ilpeet"as"i iloperetta caused a furor in this
Association will present a film, Aud.
"Nehru's Visit to U.S." in Aud. A. --country with Merry Widow hats
They will also show a Hindi movie.-two-feet wide and made of lace
8:30 p.m. - Miss Anne-Marie Co psGives Test iand feathers-becoming the vogue
Grunder, violinist, and Benning along with Merry Widow dresses,
Baxter, pianist, will perform a corsets, perfumes and cocktails.
concert at the First Unitarian One of the greatest attractions
Church. The program will include of "The Merry Widow" was its
sonatas of Bach, Beethoven and The Placement Test for Peace dancing. With the famed "Merry
Prokofieff and two works of Corps volunteers will be given - _ __ -
Chopin. every day through Monday, No-
SUNDAY, NOV. 22 vember 23, at 9 a.m., noon and 4
2:30 p.m.-"The Merry Widow" p.m. in Rm. 3C of the Michigan IDEPENDABLE
will be presented in Hill Aud. Union. iD^D CC 1

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices stould be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication. and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on Request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21

General Notices
University Senate: The regular fal
meeting of the University Senate will
be held Mon., Nov. 23, at 4:15 p.m. in
Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Coming? The Premiere Production of
"eThe Peacemaker," a drama by Carl
Oglesby, by the University of Michi-
gan Players of the Dept. of Speech in
cooperation with thedDept. of Eng-
lish, at Trueblood Aud., Frieze Bldg.,
Dec. 2-5. All seats $1. Mail orders
now being taken. Make checks payable
to University Players. Send orders to
University of Michigan Players, Dept.

Metallurgist, BS pref. 1-2 yrs. exper.
in metal., bkgd. in ferrous & non-fer-
rous metals. .
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments. 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
Detroit Civil Service-Mr. Walters will
interview students Tues., Dec. 1, for
positions at the Detroit Zoo available
to residents of Detroit & suburbs.-
Openings for park maintenance assist-
ants, play leaders, camp counselors,
public service attendants, swimming
positions & student engineers. Also
student technical assistants in bus.
ad., soc. sci., & general sci. and stu-
dent medical assistant/extern.
International Student Travel Center,r
Inc.-Mr. Gordon, director, will ex-
plain how ITSC gets students jobsI
abroad on Mon. & Tues., Nov. 23 & 24.
Meetings are being held in Room 3540
SAB at 9, 10, & 11 a.m. and 1, 2, 3, &
4 p.m. Any student may come to the
meetings; room for 40 people at each
session.
* * *
For further information, come to
Summer Placement, 212 SAB.

THE NEW YORK CITY OPERA COMPANY will present Franz
Lehar's operetta, "The Merry Widow," Sunday afternoon in Hill
Aud. Above, the heroine of the light romance sings with the
rest of the cast. The opera company also performed Johann
Strauss' "Die Fledermaus" last night and will present Charles
Gounod's "Faust" Sunday night.

Dial 665-6290

vk"mr.:.r mWririr

Shows at 1, 3, 5,
7 and 9:05 p.m.

of Speech, Ann Arbor.
The next U-M Players production
Day Calendar will be anton Chekhov's "Uncle vanya"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, playing
Doctoral Examination for WilliamJ
Sherman Chisholm, English Language
& Literature; thesis: "Sentence Patterns ! lac men
in 'The Sound and The Fury'," Sat.,
Nov. 21, 2601 Haven Hall, at 10 a.m. ANNOUNCEMENT:
Chairman, J. W. Downer. Univ. of Pittsburgh, Grad. School
of Public & International Affairs-
Announces Master's & Doctoral pro-
grams in fields of Pub. Admin., In-
ternational Affairs, Econ. & Soc Dev.,
ORGAN& Urban Affairs. Financial assistance
available. Further information at Bu-
reau.
NOTICESPOSITION OPENINGS:
U.S. Air Force, Mass.-Historian. BA
or MA Hist. plus 2-3 yrs. exper. or
trng. which includes planning, coordi-
Use of This Column for Announce- nating or directing research projects.
menuis vaiableto ffiiall reog. Atkinson Mfg. Co., Ludington, Mich.
nized and registered student organiza--ndustriangingr wi.h3-5 yrs.
tions only. Forms are available in Room exper. for metalworking mfgr.
1011 AB. yMcGraw-Hill Book Co., N.Y., N.Y.-
1 College Traveler. Male with General
Gamma Delta, 6 p.m., supper; 6:45, inrest is bmajor ithduc feld for
short business meeting and Thanks- textbook publisheri
giving program, Nov. 22 1511 Washte- Talon, Inc., Meadville, Pa.-1. Proj-
naw Ave. ect & design engr. ME or Math ma-
Guild House, Sunday Seminar, "His- jor with exper. in field. 2. Indust.
tory of Christian Thought," Nov. 22, engr., rec. grad., ME or Math. 3.
7 to 8 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.

i
r

3 p.m.-The Ann Arbor CivicI

i

Theater will hold try-outs

for

Students may receive informa-
tion about the Peace Corps on the
ground level of the Union.

_
i

i

DIXIELAND
OLD HEIDELBERG
TONIGHT

i

i

111

IQC-ASSEMBLY SING
Mon., Nov. 23 Aud. A
Angell Hall
FR EE ADMISSION

Special
Today thru Sat.
49c & 99c
Suits, Trousers
Dresses, Skirts
1 hr. service 9 a.m.-4 p m.
KLEEN KING

I

Su V C E
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.
NEW CAR DEALER
Triumph-Volvo-
Fiat-Checker
HERB ESTES
AUTOMART
319 W Huron
665-3688

i1~*A Cwr..y~iax r..u
ctongdebbie pat
earasreyols boone

GOODBYO
Jana Barnes ILaura Devon
Waclter matthau 4
DaMvibaa/Yrt/Vne Mnw~ial/ HanryKumitz r
A Venice Prodcion io Pre - Ciiian&Seope" Co&'r by De Lumw

A
FIMM"W

DIAL 662-6264
Shows Start at
1:00-2:40-4:45
7:00 and 9:05

0

Unitarian Student Group, Jeffrey
Goodman discusses XES on campus,
Nov. 22, 7 p.m., 1917 Washtenaw.
Rides at Michigan Union, Markley at
6:45 p.m.
University of Michigan Student Em-
ployes' Union is holding a general
meeting, to discuss policy and hold
elections to fill a vacant executive
committee position, Nov. 22, Room 3C,
Michigan Union, 7:30 p.m.
* a
Young Socialist Alliance, Speech by
Jack Barnes, national organizer of
TSA. Topic: "The Myth of American
Liberalism," Nov. 23, 7:30 p.m., Room
3529 SAB.

Special
Today thru Sat.
49c & 99c
Suits, Trousers
Dresses, Skirts
I hr. service 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
KLEEN KING

"A lusty, boldly provocative production" e

3!

LHARICHARD PETER
BURTON- OTOOLE
HAL WALLS' . PANAVISION'
, TECHNICOLOR

I

I

HELD OVER!
Shows Continuous
Today
From 1 O'clock

I

DIAL 8-6416 ~ LA
D I L 8 6 3I A l l S e a t s $ 1 . 0 0
Any Time
This Show

The Eastern Michigan University
Players Present
William Gibson's
THE MIRACLE WORKER
November 18-22 Tickets $1.25
Quirk Theatre For Reservations
Curtain at 8:00 Phone HU 2-3453

11

i

11

i'

11

Presentation and Discussion
"THE SEARCH OF THE
ANTI"HERO"
The protagonist in Faulkner, Hemingway,
Salinger, Updike, and Camus
by
Dr. Robert F. Haugh, Dept. of English

A FREE BOTTLE of
JEAN NATE After-Bath Lotion
is at the QUARRY for You.

Sunday, Nov. 22
Baptist Campus Center

6:45 P.M.
502 East Huron

St.

W atch for your card in the mail now.

I1

...

The QUARRY, 320 S. State

TONIGHT &TOMORROW: MACBETH j
Orson Welles' originally controversial, now classic interpretation of William
Shakespeare's great tragedy.E
r
I

y w
:r
i :
}:
t;+.;

TREAT YOUR DATE TO SOME MID-WEEK FUN

School Time

LEONARD BERNSTEIN'S

,

0

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