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November 17, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-11-17

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PAGE TWO

I

THE MICHIf AN DA I LV

VTTVQTfAV XTd'%X7VXT" n IF4 Incl....

1Il l.Vll l-V L111 LLilLl

TUESDi.AY, iNOJVEMBERJ JA17, 1964'

4

SHEFFIELD PROGR AM:
Students Compare Education

ACROSS CAMPUS:
City Planning Exhibition Presented

'DISTINGUISHED FACULTY'
Blake Wants Students
To Experience Culture

By KAY HOLMES
Is the American population be-
ing annihilated by juvenile de-
linquents? How are the Beatles
received in the United States?
University students who studied
in Sheffield last semester under
the program offered by the educa-
tion school encountered these and
many other questions.
Education is the goal of the
Alumni Report
Staff Changes
Staff changes to strengthen
three of the major operating areas
of the University Alumni Associa-
tion will become effective imme-
diarely, Association General Sec-
retary, Robert O. Morgan reported
recently.
Richard H. Emmons, now the
public information officer of the
medical school and a former city
editor of the Ann Arbor News, will
join the association staff as man-
aging editor of the "Michigan
Alumnus" magazine.
Emmons will succeed Harold M.
Wilson who will return -o a post
he held earlier, the secretaryhip
of the Class Officers Council. Wil-
son will also have staff liaison re-
sponsibility with the University's
school and college alumni societies
and be contributing editor of the
Michigan Alumnus.
William B. Stegath, assistant to
the general secretary, will become
the association's new field sec-
retary and assume major respon-
sibility for the 150 alumni clubs
throughout the world. He suc-

Sheffield program. Initiated and
presently coordinated by Prof.
Claude A. Eggertsen of the edu-
cation school the program is four
years old. It is part of the com-
parative education program at the
University, enabling students to
study the professional education
of another country.
The students become acquainted
with school aims and practices in
England, while earning from 2 to
16 credit hours at the University.
The students board with fami-
lies or other University approved
lodging, elect courses in Shef-I
field's Dept. of Education, and
practice teach in surrounding
areas.
Weekends provide time for
travel, as do vacations. However,
students also spend much leisure
tie einathe Student Union, which
serves as a coffee and conversa-
tion center.
"The students sit around and
'fester,' which is their term for a1
coffee-break and bull session com-
bination," Pat Gurski, '65, said.
"You begin to think about the1
American way of life, and defend
it under their critical examina-
tion," she said.t
Another one of the 15 Univer-
sity students who participated in
the program, Rhoda Rothenberg,
'65, said, "Everything's an educa-
tion that results from studying1
abroad, the people, the travelling,
the thinking."
Both Miss Rothenberg and Miss
Gurski remarked on the early
specialization in Britain and the
small university enrollment. t
University students in Englandj
do not fulfill distribution require-
ments as in the American system.
They concentrate almost exclu-1

An exhibition of "Projects in
Architecture and City Planning"
by Dean Reginald F. Malcolmson,
of the architecture and design
college is presented in Alumni
Memorial Hall through Dec. 20.
The exhibition includes plan-
ning and architectural projects
from Malcolmson's teaching and
professional experience.
* * *
TUESDAY, NOV. 17
8:30 a.m.-Ralph Nichols of the
University of Minnesota wili speak
on "How to Plan and Conduct a
Listening-Training Program for
Supervisors" in the Mich'gan Un-
ion.
8:30 a.m.-George S. Odiorne
will give a lecture on the "Use,
Selection, Evaluation, and Wriiing
of Programmed Materials" in the
Michigan Union.
Noon-Prof. Kenneth L. Pike of
the English Department will speak
on "Communicating Christianity
in Primitive Cultures" at the In-
ternational Center.
4 p.m.-Prof. Jesse Pitts of
Wayne State University will speak
Carr To Run
For City Post

on "Education in France" in Rack-
ham Amph.
4:30 p.m. - String instrument
students will give a concert in the
Recital Hall of the School of Mu-
sic.
8 p.m.-Guy Larcom, city ad-
ministrator of Ann Arbor, will
speak on "Administration and the
Political Process" in the West
Conference Rm. of the Rackham
Bldg.
8:30 p.m. - The New York
Chamber Soloists will perform in
Rackham Aud.
8:30-Jack Kripl, saxophonist,
will give a concert in the Recital
Hail ofthe School of Music.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 18
1:10p.m.-Josephine C. Moore
of the anatomy department will
speak on "Utilization of Active
Resistive Stretch to IncreaseMus-
cular Strength in Adults" it 2051
East Medical Bldg.
4 p.m.-Prof. George Hammond
of the California Institute of Tech-
nology will deliver the Werncr E.
Bachman Memorial Lecture for
1964 in Rm. 1400 of the Chemistry
Bldg. Hammond will speak on
"Energy Transfer in Photochemi-
cal Reactions."
4:15 p.m.-Juan Orrege-Salas,
guest composer - lecturer, will
speak on "A Journey through Lat-
in-American Music History" in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
4:15 p.m.-Lawrence Alloway,
curator of the Guggenheim Mu-
seum, will speak on "American
Drawings" in Aud. B.
7:30 p.m.-The Winter Weekend
promotions committee will meet
in Rm. 3R of the Union.
8 p.m.-Miss Jeanette Thomp-
son of the Sheffield, England Col-
lege for Elementary Teachers, will
speak on her work in Sheffield in

8 p.m.-Prof. Marvin Felheim,
of the English department, will
speak at the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation on "Some Trends n
the Contemporary Jewish Novel."
8:30 p.m.-The University Wood
Wind Quintet will perform in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Braaten Cites
Suicide Rise
Collegiate Press Service
The number of student suicides
in the United States has risen
during the past few. years, ac-
cording to a report in the National
Education Association's official
magazine.
Dr.Leif Braaten, former psy-
chologist of Cornell University and
author of the current study, out-
lined four motives for student
suicide.
-Some students have a dcsire
to destroy themselves because they
can no longer tolerate the dis-
crepancy between their self-image
and how they would like to be.
-Some students feel the need
to punish others who hurt them.
-Some students have an urge
to repent from a sin.
-Some suicide cases are cries
for help.
The Cornell doctors who con-
ducted the study found that the
student-patient who gets the
highest marks is the one most
likely to commit suicide.
"The bright students were often
overreaching themselves," the re-
port stated. "They are measuring
themselves by their own standards,
which were much higher and inore
demanding than the minimum

PROF. CLAUDE EGGERTSEN I
take three chemistry courses and,
only one math elective.
"Britain educates her intellec-
tual elite, whereas we educate the
masses," Miss Gurski said. "But
actually, the two systems are
quite similar except that in Eng-
land the students are separated
into different schools according to
ability, not just into 'accelerated'
classrooms, as in some American
nrncrramc'' ln A n

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
seventh of a series of articles on the
recipients of two University faculty
awards, the Distinguished Faculty
Achievement Award and the Dis-
tinguished Service Award.
By IRA SHOR
Prof. Caesar Blake of the Eng-
lish department, and a winner
of a Distinguished Service Award
this year, conceives of the teacher
as a mediator between his stu-
dents and his subject.
"I want to make the student ex-
perience culture through contact
with literature," he said.
Blake added that a teacher
must make available to the stu-
dent a large body of facts and
a method of approaching his dis-
cipline. Using this as a base, the
student will then be in a position
to add creatively to the knowl-
edge accumulated in his field.
"Intimate Diagolgue"
"I work best with students in
an intimate kind of dialogue, and
feel most rewarded when I can
draw out the best they can offer,"
he said.
While Blake has found the lec-
ture method to be efficient and
useful in many instances, he does
not find it the most satisfying.
"To engage the student's mind,I
we must have a more intimate
contact. The recitation method is
more tedious, but much more
fruitful in guiding the student to
his own discovery," he explained.
Varied Approach
Blake defeats the monotony that
arises from teaching the same
material from semester to semes-
ter by varying his approach to
the subject.
"Unfortunately, there is not
enough time allowed in my teach-
ing schedule for my own work
and contemplation, as a conscien-
tious teacher must work his own
life around his class hours," Blake
said.
He believes that there are a
great many creative and intelli-
gent students at the University,
but he is concerned about the
University's efforts in their be-
half.

PROF. CASEAR BLAKE

programs, she added. Robert W. Carr yesterday be-
Comparing university life in came the first person to announce
Sheffield with life at the Univer- his candidacy for the Ann Arbor
sity, Miss Rothenberg said, "You City Council.
don't feel the necessity of doing The 32-year-old government
something all the time. Most of and history teacher at Forsythe
the time you sit around and talk Junior High School will be a
to people; it's a relaxed relation- Democratic candidate for the
ship.'' council in the Fifth Ward.
Applications for the Sheffield If Carr is opposed, he will face
program are available through the a primary election test in Feb-

* MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
aa
~OFF SCOFF
* Phone 761-0001
SLARGE PIZZA
THOMPSON'S
* RESTAURANT
. Free Delivery or pick up. u
One Coupon Per Pizza
Begins Mon., 16th-
Expires Thurs., 19th
Special.
Today thru Sat.
49c & 99c
Suits, Trousers
Dresses, Skirts
1 hr. service 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
KLEEN KING

c
T

ceeds Philip J. Brunskill, who has sively on their elected major, for Undergraduate Committee in the ruary. The council election will the University High School Li- standards of the University," the
resigned to enter private business. instance a chemistry major might education school. be in April. brary. report concluded.
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x:L..va... ....... F:.:a..:t..t . : ::.:::.,:s ::""or::}..

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices sl-ould be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on Request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
Day Calendar
Biological Chemistry Colloquium:
Presents Dr. Robert E. Olson, Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh, on "Biosynthesis of
Coenzyme Q," today at 4 p.m., M6423
Med. Science Bldg.
Public Administration Social Sem-
inar: Will present Guy Larcom, city
administrator on, "Administration and
the Political Process," today at 8
p.m., West Conference Room, Rackham
Bldg.
Professor Jesse Pitts of the Sociology
Dept., Wayne State University, will
lecture on education in France on

Tues., Nov. 17, 4 p.m. Rackham Amphi-
theater. Sponsored by Dept. of Ro-
mance Languages and the Alliance
Francaise.
Doctoral Examination fpr Tse-Sheng
Ling, Mechahical Engineering; thesis:
"The Logical and Analytical Structure
of the Computer-Aided Design Proc-
ess as Applied to a Class of Mechani-
cal Design Problems," Tues., Nov. 17,
220 W. Engrg. Bldg., at 3 p.m.
Special Lecture Series No. 4: Dr. Rob-
ert Ullman (Ford Motor Co. Research
Laboratories) will speak on "Some
Topics in the Physical Chemistry of
Polymers," on Wed., Nov. 18 in Room
1300 of the Chem. Bldg. at 7:30 p.m.
Lecture III: "Sedimentation of Macro-
molecules."
Doctoral Examination for Ronald
James Mason, Anthropology; thesis:
"Two Stratified Sites on the Door
Peninsula of Wisconsin," Tues., Nov.
17, 4011 Museums Bldg., at 2 p.m.
Chairman, J. B. Griffin.1

tor, Division of Special Education and p.m. The charge is $1.00 for students tice in field. Research Assistant, 2
Rehabilitation, Syracuse University, and spouse and $1.50 for faculty, staff yrs. college work, bkgd. in general
will speak on the topic, "Education of and spouses. science including biol., zoo., chem. and
the Hyperactive Child (with or with- NOTE: This will be the last "flu math. Deadline for applying Dec. 4.
out Brain Injury)" on Wed., Nov. 19, shot" clinic this year. Also positions with Health Dept. -
from 7 to 9 p.m. in Rackham Amphi- continuous recruitment for Clinical Soc.
theatre. Computing Machinery at the Univer- Workers, Psychologists & Therapists.
sity of Michigan-A critique of a re- U.S. Civil Service-Accountant and
Research Club: There will be a port with the above subject prepared Auditor, grads with min. of 24 hrs.
meeting of the Research Club of the 1 by the Ad Hoc Computing Advisory in acctg. Grad study, field exper, "B"
University of Michigan Wed., Nov. i Committee will be held Nov. 19 at 4:15 average, or certificate as CPA will
18 at 8 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi- p.m. in Aud. B of Angell Hall. The qualify for higher rating. Applications
theatre. Prof. William C. Parkinson report describes the present status of accepted until further notice.
will speak on "Nuclear Physics and the computing activity at the University, The Aetna Casualty & Surety Co.,
New Cyclotron Facility" and Prof. Or- makes an evaluation of future needs, Hartford, Conn.-Management Devel-
ren C. Mohler will speak on "Some and recommends procedures to accom- opment Program leading to supervis-
Recent Astronomical Discoveries." The modate those needs. All concerned fac- ory & managerial positions for grad-
Council will meet at 7 p.m. in the ulty and staff are urged to study the uating seniors or rec. grads. Trng. in
East Council Room. report and attend the meeting. Addi- sales promotion, claims investigation, &
tional copies of the report are available casualty or property underwriting.
Directory Delayed: Because of a de- in the office of J. E. Lesch, 1514 Ad- -Vice-President (Engrg.), EE or ME,
lay by the printer, the University ministration Bldg. exper. in dev. & res. of aerospace &
Directory of Faculty and Staff will military products. Engrg. administra-
not be available for campus distribu- ! tor. Pharmaceutical Research Chemist,
tion until early in December. tP acemen tdegree in Chem., Pharm., or Pharm.
TEEPAEN:Chem., 5-10 yrs. exper.
N w 1TEACHER PLACEMENT:

I

Doctoral Examination for Robert Ken-
ley Burdette, English Language & Lit-
erature; thesis: 'Dylan Thomas and
the Gnostic Religion," Tues., Nov. 17,
2601 Haven Hall, at 4 p.m. Chairman,
N. E. Nelson.
General Notices
The Inter-Cooperative Council Edu-
cation Committee is sponsoring a Peace
Corps recruiting speaker and discus-
sion on Wed., Nov. 18 at 7 p.m. at Mich-
igan Co-op, 315 N. State. All are wel-
come to attend.
Postdoctoral Fellowship for Study
in Belgium: The Graduate School may
nominate one candidate for a post-
doctoral fellowship in any field for
1965-66 at a Belgian university. Can-
didates must be a U.S. citizen com-
pleting all requirements for the PhD
in 1964-65 or earlier. Prospective nom-
inees should consult Assoc. Dean Free-
man D. Miller, Rm. 118 Rackham Bldg.
before Dec. 1.
Graduate Record Examination: Can-
didates taking the Graduate Record
Examination on Sat., Nov. 21, are re-
quested to report to Room 130 Busi-
ness Administration Bldg. at 8:30 a.m.
Saturday.
Special Education Colloquium Se-
ries: Dr. William Cruickshank, direc-

Student Government Council approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be with-
held until the approval has become
effective.
Approval request forms for student-
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
Le Cercle Francais, Baratin, every
Thursday, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Challenge, Nov. 16, 4 p.m., Con-
flict Resolution Center.
Voice, Membership meeting, Nov. 16,;
7:30 p.m., Room 3B, Union.!
Voice, Membership meeting, Nov. 30,1
7:30 p.m., Room 3B, Union.
Arnold Air Society, Pledge formal,
Dec. 4, 9-12 p.m., Michigan Union.
Flu Shots: There will be a "flu shot"
clinic at the Health Service Wednesday,
Nov. 18 from 8-11:30 a.m. and 1-4:30
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

The following schools have record-
ed vacancies for the near future:
Kalamazoo, Mich.-Teacher of Per-
ceptual Development (Nov. 25).
Petersburg, Mich. (Summerfield Sch)
-High School Social Studies (now).
Skokie, Ill. (Niles Twp.)-H.S. Guid-
ance - woman preferred; H.S. Eng-
lish Reading (Rem. & Develop.) -
second sem. or as soon as possible.
OVERSEAS PLACEMENT:
Teachers are needed for the Dept.
of Defense Overseas Dependent Schools
in the Azores, Bermuda, Crete, Ethio-
pia, Europe, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
Iceland, Japan, Korea, Labrador, Libya,
Midway Island, Morocco, Newfound-
land, Okinawa, Pakistan, Philippines,
Taiwan, Trinidad, and Turkey. Candi-
dates must be at least 21 years of
age, have a bachelor's degree, 18 se-
mester hours in education courses, two
school years experience as a teacher
within the last five years, and pref-
erably single. A representative will be
at the Bureau of Appointments to in-
terview on Dec. 11 & 12. Appoint-
ments must be made ahead of time.
* *; *
For additional information, contact
the Bureau of Appointments, Educa-
tion Division, 3200 SAB, 764-7462.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint-
ments with the following:
THURS., NOV. 19-~
B. F. Chamberlain 'Real Estate Co.,
Royal Oak, Mich.-Liberal arts majors
with interest in sales and mortgage
work.
POSITION OPENINGS:
State of Michigan-Drug Inspector,
registered pharmacist, 3 yrs. exper.,
must be willing to travel about state.
Application deadline Nov. 30.
State of Idaho-Home Economist. De-
gree plus 3 yrs. exper. teaching home
economics, general teaching, or prac-

For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-j
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-H W. Engrg.
for appointments with the following:
NOV. 19-
Cutler-Hammer, Inc.-BS: EE & ME.
April & June grads. Sales.
NOV. 19-20-
Goodyear Aerospace Corp., Akron,
Ohio-MS-PhD: AE & Astro. & EE.
PhD: ChE, CE, Physics & Math. R. &
D. & Des.
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Akron,
Ohio-BS: ChE, CE, EE, IE, ME, Chem.
BS-MS: Org. Chem. R. & D., Des.,
Prod. & Plant Engrg.
NOV. 19-
R. K. LeBlond Machine Tool Co.,
Cincinnati, Ohio-BS: IE & ME. Des.,
Prod. & Sales.
Throughout the U.S.-BS: ChE, CE,
EE, E Math, EM, E Phys., IE & ME.

R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
Owens Corning Fiberglas Corp. Tech.
Center, Granville, Ohio-All Degrees:
ChE, EM & ME & Chem. Prof.: Ap-
plied Mech. MS: CE. BS-MS: IE. MS-
PhD: Mat'ls. & Met. BS: E Math, E
Physics & Sci. Engrg. PhD: Physics.
Men & women. R. & D. & Des.
Swift & Co., Chicago Ill.-BS, MS &
Prof.: ChE. BS-MS: ME. BS: EE, EM.
MS: Instrum. R. & D.
U.S. Rubber Co., Detroit Plant &
Corp. R & D-BS-MS: CE, EE, E Math,
EM & ME. BS: E Physics. R. & D.
U.S. Rubber Co., Plant Engrg., Prod.
& Quality Control Supv., Detroit Plant
-BS-MS: ChE, EE & ME. BS: IE &
Sci. Engrg. Prod.
West Virginia State Road Comm.,
Charleston & throughout the state-
BS-MS: CE. R. & D., Des., Constru.,
Operation & Maintenance.
Part-I ime
Employment
The following part-time jobs are avail-
able. Application for these jobs can be
ade in the Part-Time Employment Of-
fice, 2200 Student Activities Bldg., dur-
ing the following hours: Mon. thru
Fri,. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til 5
p.m.
Employers desirous or firing students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Mrs. Jennison, at
NO 3-1511, Ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
There are several jobs available on
either a full-time or part-time basis
in many areas. Applicants are needed
to do gardening, selling, cashiering,
janitorial and clerical. Especially need-
ed are good typists with or without
shorthand. Pay rates for these jobs
are between $1.25 per hour and $2.00
per hour.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY
presents
"TRIAL BY JURY"
and
"THE SORCERER"
Opening Thurs., Nov. 19th-8 p.m.
TICKETS Fri., Nov. 20, 8:00 p.m. TICKETS
AVAILABLE Thurs. $1.50
Nov. SBt., No. , 8:00 at. Mat. $1.00
Lydia 16-21 Sat. matinee, 2:00 p.m. Fri. & Sat. $2.00

I

4

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

: m

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Shows Start At
1:00 - 2:40 - 4:45 - 6:45 & 8:55
Feature Starts

Dial 662-6264 20 Minutes Later
IT A*I SORT w
4O: AMERICAN
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LATE SHOW :< &
WITH A TEEN-...
"AGE "
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NEXT! "RIO CONCHOS"

4

4

The Eastern Michigan University
Players Present

Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Alpha Phi Omega, Regular chapter
meeting, Nov. 18, 7 p.m., Room 3-C,
Michigan Union.
* * *
Canterbury, Tuesday talk and tea,
discussion, Prof. Carl Cohen, Dept. of
Philosophy, "Some Informal Remarks
Concerning the Relationship of Re-
ligion and Democracy," Tues., Nov. 17,
4:15 p.m., Canterbury House, 218 N.
Division St.
Special
Today tIru Sat.
49c & 99c

RICHARD PETER
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1-IATALLK' PANAVISION
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THE MIRACLE WORKER

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November 18-22
Quirk Theatre
Curtain at 8:00

Tickets $1.25
For Reservations
Phone HU 2-3453

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1 hr. service 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
KLEEN KING

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