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November 17, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-11-17

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TUESDA&', NOVEMBER 17, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAVIR 'IRR! '1

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Court Gives State
Time to District
Pennsylvania Court Order Points to

Ackley Officially in
New Economics Post

'Deliberate Speed' Districting

View

WASHINGTON (P-The Supreme Court indicated yesterday that
it will keep hands off legislative reapportionment problems so long
as state or lower federal courts can solve them in acceptable 'one-
man, one-vote," fashion.
A unanimous two-page opinion' by the high tribunal gave a green
light to a Pennsylvania Supreme Court order that the state legisla-
ture come up with a reapportionment plan by Sept. 1, 1965-in time
for the 1966 election.
The Pennsylvania court made such a ruling last Sept. 29 after

the U.S. Supreme Court handed 'd
World News
Roundup

do,
I
i
i

>wn its historic June 15 decree that
4both houses of state legislatures
must be apportioned as nearly as
practicable on a population basis.
Special Court Ruling
Yesterday's opinion vacated a
ruling of last April 9 by a spe-
cial three-judge U.S. district court
which held invalid the state's leg-
islative apportionment act of Jan.
9, 1964 and the legislative appor-
tionment provisions of the state
constitution. That ruling-before
the high tribunal's June decision

By the Associated Press
BERLIN-A high West German
official said yesterday his gov-
ernment wants to reopen its con-
tacts with Communist China.
"Now that the American elec-
tions are over, we can move ahead
in our dealings with Red China,"
the official said. He declined to
allow use of his name.
L r
-LL
PRIME MINISTER ERHARD
The official emphasized that
the Bonn government would not
resume talks with Peking until
Chancellor Ludwig Erhard has
explained the West Germany po-
sition to President Lyndon B.
Johnson. West Germany and Chi-
na held preliminary talks this
year on renewing trade ties. They
signed a one-year trade agree
ment in 1957 but it has never
been renewed.
s s s
WASHINGTON-Labor disputes
in the automobile industry caus-
ed a sizeable dip in over-all U.S.
industrial production last month.
The Federal Reserve Board re-
ported yesterday its production
index slipped to 131.7 per cent of
the 1957-59 average compared
with 134.0 in September. The
drop was the first in more than
a year.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The deficit
flow of U.S. dollars abroad de-
clined slightly to an annual rate
of less than $2.3 billion in the
July-September period, the Com-
merce Department reported yes-
terday.
The quarterly report indicated
that the improvement may be only
temporary although the deficit
for the year is likely to be sub-
stantially below the $3.3 billion
in 1963. The dollar loss has been
trimmed drastically since mid-
1963, when it reached an annual
rate of $5.2 billion.
* * *
LONDON-Prime Minister Har-
old Wilson approved yesterday a
pay raise to members of Parlia-
ment but trimmed by half the
increase recommended for him-
self and his ministers. The salary
for a House of Commons mem-
ber was raised from 1,750 pounds
($5,390) a year to 3,250 pounds
($9,100)-a raise of about 86 per
cent.

-Associated Press
REVEAL PLANS FOR KENNEDY MEMORIAL
THE ABOVE MODEL, a design for a permanent memorial at the grave of President John F. Kennedy
in Arlington National Cemetery, was unveiled in Washington yesterday. Construction on the
memorial, designed by achitect John C. Warnecke, will begin in the fall of 1965. Speaking for the
Kennedy family, Sen. Robert Kennedy noted that the plans have the approval of the family. The
Kennedys are paying for most of the $2 million construction.
Slips of Tongue in Viet Nam

By the Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Prof. Gardner
B. Ackley, former chairman of
the University's economics de-
partment, was officially sworn
in yesterday as the new chairman
of President Lyndon B. John-
son's Council of Economic Ad-
visors.
Johnson conferred the chair-
manship upon Ackley at a White
House ceremony. Ackley replaces
Prof. Walter B. Heller as chair-
man.
Heller, who had headed the
council since early 1961, resigned
to return to his former post as
chairman of the economics de-
partment of the University of
Minnesota.
Johnson, while expressing re-
gret that he had been unable to
persuade Heller to remain as
chairman, said he had full con-
fidence that Ackley and his as-
sociates will carry on with ad-
vice and counsel which will "keep
the nation's economy growing."
Johnson also swore in another
new member for the three-man
advisory council. He is Prof. Ar-
thur B. Okun of Yale University,
who served the council as senior
economist in 1961-62 and rejoin-
ed the staff in the same capacity
in November.
Johnson told the participants
at the swearing-in ceremony that
"economics has come of age in
policymaking in this govern-
ment."
Prof. Otto Eckstein of Harvard
University remains as the third
member of the council.

CHAIRMAN GARDNER ACKLEY

TIME
The Weekly Newsmagazine

-had been stayed pending ap-I
peal.
Pennsylvania went ahead with
its legislative elections this month.
The unsigned U.S. Supreme
Court opinion, while indicating a
favorable attitude toward the
Pennsylvania Supreme Court's
approach, did not approve it in
so many words. Without further
comment, it merely told the fed-
eral district court to keep an eye
on the situation in view of "deci-
sions supervening" since that,
court acted last April.
The approach to specific legis-
lative reapportionment problems
seems to be similar to that taken
after the court handed down its
1954 landmark school desegrega-
tion decisions. That left it up to
the district courts as far as prac,
ticable to deal with various fol-
lowup school cases "with all de-
liberate speed."
All-Deliberate- Speed
The Pennsylvania Supreme
Court, in its order on legislative
reapportionment, laid down an
all-deliberate-speed formula:
"We have indicated that it is
our expectation that the legisla-
ture will proceed in timely fash-
ion to enact reapportionment laws
which conform to constitutional
requirements. We must recognize,
however, that if the general as-
sembly fails to act in a timely
fashion, we shall be obliged to
take necessary affirmative ac-
tion to insure that the 1966 elec-
tion " of Pennsylvania legislators
will be conducted pursuant to a
constitutionally valid plan."
In another apportionment case,
the court refused to dismiss as
moot-that is, no longer an issue
--an appeal from a decision pro-
hibiting Georgia from placing on
its ballot earlier this month a
proposed new constitution. The
court said it would hear the ques-
tion of mootness argued tomorrow
when it listens to arguments on
the lower court's action.
SOVIET UNION
Monthly pictorial in color
English, Russian, or Spanish
Published in Soviet Union
Like a trip through the U.S.S.R.
One year subscription $2.50
IMPORTED PUB. & PROD. (M)
1 Union Square, N.Y.C. 10003

By FRED S. HOFFMAN
Associated Press Military Writer
WASHINGTON - An apparent
slip of the tongue by Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara
shows how difficult it is to main-
tain an official line at all tmies
when the realities clash with
that line.
"We have no plans at present
to send further combat units to
South Viet Nam ," McNamara told
newsmen in Texas aftera confer-
ring 'with President Lyndon B.
Johnson about the budget and
other matters.
It was McNamara's use of the
word "further" that brought re-
porters up short. For that word
suggests the United States already
has combat units in South Viet
Nam.
The official transcript of Mc-
Namara's comments Tuesday did
not include the word "further."
But newsmen who heard the word
at the time and checked on the
deletion said the omission ap-
peared to be inadvertent. A tape
recording shows that the word
was used.
Neither McNamara nor any
other responsible U.S. official
ever has said that any of the 20,-
000 or so American military men
in South Viet Nam are there to
fight.
Official Position
McNamara gave a succinct sum-
mation of the U.S. policy line last
Sept. 30 when he said during a
television interview:
"We are providing logistical
support, military advice, transport
assistance. We are not carrying
on the battle ourselves. We can-
not stand in their place and fight
the Communists within the bor-
ders of their country."
"Some Informal Remarks
Concerning the Relationship
of Religion and Democracy"
PROF. CARL COHEN
Dept. of Philosophy
Tuesday, Nov. 17, 4:15 p.m.
Canterbury House 218 N. Division
Students of all faiths-
or lack thereof-
welcome.

The U.S. government has held
to this stand in the face of clear
evidence that U.S. Army helicop-
ters equipped with rockets and
machine guns have mounted at-
tack after attack against guer-
rillas.
This government has continued
to insist that many of the bomb-
ing and naplam assaults by U.S.
planes against Viet Cong positions
and hideouts are training flights
for South Vietnamese Air Force
men who go along on such mis-
sions.
Maybe a Case
A case perhaps can be made
that American Army and Marines
who are attached to Vietnamese
ground units are truly advisers
and only incidentally to that func-
tion do they get into shooting
scraps. To many Am'nericans,
watching the U.S. casualty list
mount above 1600 dead, wounded
and missing since January 1961,
the distinction between combat
and advisory duty may be hard
to accept.
Why does the U.S. government
draw such a distinction. Several
Special
Today thru Sat.
49c & 99c
Suits, Trousers
Dresses, Skirts
1 hr. service 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
KLEEN KING

reasons are suggested:
--If the United States acknowl-
edged it was fighting in South
Viet Nam China might be im-
pelled to enter the war.
-As long as, U.S. might has
not officially been committed as
such, any defeat that may re-
sult in this war could be charged
off as a South Vietnamese de-
feat, not American.
-The outright commitment of
U.S. fighting men in combat for-
mations might cause repercus-
sions in Congress and among the
American people. There might be
questions about the legality of
such an undeclared war.
-The people of South Viet Nam
and others in Southeast Asia
might consider U.S. combat com-
mitment a return to a form of
colonialism.

ANNOUNCES
A VERY SPECIAL
SUBSCRIPTION RATE
k (New or Renewal)
AVAILABLE ONLY
TO ENROLLED
UNDERGRADUATE
AND
GRADUATE
STUDENTS.

LATIN
AMERICAN
FIESTA.
ISA League Union NSA
UN ION BALLROOM
Friday, Nov. 20
8:30-12:00
Music by Art Bartner
and his orchestra
FREE
All Students Invited

ONE FULL YEAR
52 WEEKLY ISSUES
ONLY
$2.OO*

know
how
many
req uests
we
get
every
half
hour
0
-
~~1
4
fl
*

Neither do we,
but it's plenty.
Seems like every
U. of M. co-ed is
screaming for petti-
pants and we love
it!
Top: Van Raalte
deeply lace-bordered
petti-pants. Red,
White, Black. 4-7
3.95,
Bottom: Van Raalte
petti-pant with a
simple border of
tricot and lace.
Jr. sizes 7, 9, 11 and
Misses sizes 4-7.
White or Black.
3.00
State and Liberty
Mon.-Sat. 9:30-5:30

See your student representative
or college book store
'Available until December 31, 1964

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r

TOMORROW 8:00 P.M.
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
MARXIST, CHRISTIAN DISCUSSION:
"Who Is the UTOPIAN?"
with
R. MUNCY (Socialist Labor Party Exec.)
J. DEMPSEY (Prof. of Political Science)
NEWMAN STUDENT ASSOC.-331 Thompson

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SfILE
CflSURL CC
130 to $45
Regular $40 to $70
A large group of
winter Coats, n
at reduced prices ...
Many styles from
whiCh to choose, all war
interlined or with remoN
zip liningsn... Misses'
and Junior size!

*
)RTS r J
ow y
i
! Jr

A Thoughtful
Christmas Gift
from
BAYS
Personalized Jewelry

THE{
ENSIAN
YOUR YEARBOOK
$5.50 NOW
(BUT THE PRICE WILL GO UP THE BEGINNING OF 2nd SEMESTER)
0 Order it from the treasurer of your living unit or send this coupon
to our offices in the Student Publications Building, 420 Maynard.
Low m mmm immmmmm..--mmmmmmmummmm WWn W'mmM uim"'
I U
Enclosed find $5.50 (check or money order payable to the I
' MICHIGANENSIAN) for one 1965 MICHIGANENSIAN. We s
s cannot bill you later. A receipt will be sent when your order
comes in. s
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