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October 20, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE-TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1.964

PAG TW T~E MCHIAN AIY TESDY, CTOER 0, 96

SUNDAY'S SERMON:.
Gaede Advocates Defeat
Of Goldwater Movement

"This is no ordinary election
year. I do not hesitate to say
that I am very much frightened
by the prosect of a Goldwater
Victory in the November election,"
Rev. Erwin A. Gaede, minister of
the First Unitarian Church, said
in his sermon Sunday.
Departing from his usual policy
of political nonpartisanship in an
election year, Dr. Gaede warned
that such a victory would "cause
a retrocession of the significant
progress we have made for the
brotherhood of man at home and
a precious peace abroad."
Commenting on the recent
kNobel Peace Award to Dr. Martin
Luther King for his distinguished
work on behalf of racial justice,
Dr. Gaede noted that the eyes
of the world are upon us and we
cannot afford to "give any en-
couragement to the segregationists
in our land."
Segregationism
Dr. Gaede stressed that the only
form of "conservatism" which
Goldwater subscribes to is that
of segregationism. "This is the
only area in which he wishes to
maintain the status quo."
"Not only must Goldwaterism
be defeated in November, but it
must be defeated as decisively and
persuasively as possible. Anything
less would be disastrous to the
Republican party, demeaning to
the Democratic party, unhealthy
for the democratic process and
obstructive of social change," he
said.
Dr. Gaede labelled the Gold-
water movement as a phenomenon
of "political fundamentalism."
"Just as religious fundamentalism
emerged as a reaction to the
higher criticism of the Bible, so
political fundamentalism repre-
sents a reaction to the increasing
complexity of our technical so-
0ety."
Dr. Gaede said this dangerous
political phenomenon was part of

affluence and its discontents.
"Those who represented their
party at San Francisco were not
among the poor, but among the
affluent and many of them haveI
experienced a basic discontentt
with modern-day society.
The representatives complained7
largely of high taxes, high govern-
ment spending and lack of mili-
tary decisiveness abroad, Dr.;
Gaede pointed out. "Their battle
cry is one of creeping socialism."
Discontent
Goldwaterism, according to Dr.
Gaede, is the outlet valve for these.
discontented forces.
"There has always been a meas-
ure of discontent in our land, but
the channeling of this discontent
into a political party around whom
the segregationist and racists can
rally with enthusiasm if frighten-
ing, reprehensible and unthinkable
in this second half of the twen-
tieth century," he said. .
Book Stresses
Religious Need,
"Religion and the State Univer-
sity," a paperback published by
the University of Michigan Press,
cites the importance of religious
con-ent in a university education.
Professor Erich A. Walter
stressesthe impact of the diver-
gent cultural and religious back-
grounds which face the newly ar-
riving student. "For the first time
he becomes keenly aware of the
religious pluralism of our society."
The book discusses the problems
involved in the offering of religious
studies. However, it points out
the needs of such study in the
examination of universal truths.
The publication further outlines
the relevance of religion in culti-
vating the mind and spirit that
we call higher education.

Problems of
'U' Sororities
Dissimilar
(Continued from Page 1)
ZTA's 1962 fall membership was
below its house capacity, and 17'
pledges in 1963 were not enough
completely to replace a large grad-
uating class. Consequently, the
membership has remained con-
stant for two years. With only
six girls in its senior class this
year, ZTA anticipates an early
end to its membership troubles.
Mrs. Leslie is very optimistic
about the future of these houses.
"If in formal rush they could pick
up so many upperclassmen, this is
very encouraging. They usually
pick up more upperclassmen in
open rush, because open rush at-
tracts upperclassmen more than it
attracts freshmen," Mrs. Leslie
said.
Drop
Five years ago, when a change
was made from fall to spring
rush, many houses suffered a drop
in membership. "Other houses,
even larger than these three
groups, felt the burden of the
change through a drop in num-
bers similar to that experienced
by these houses. They have recov-
ered and are now strong with no
membership problems," Mrs. Les-
lie explained.

AFECIGGE C
Programs for
By MARK GUDWIN
The newly formed Americans
For Emigration to Canada If
Goldwater Gets Elected met re-
cently to discuss plans for the
coming campaign and to review
the goals of the organization.
AFFECIGGE planned to have a {
debate in the near future betweenI
Donald Lobsinger of the Greater
Detroit Homeowner's Association,
a staunch supporter of Sen. Barry
Goldwater, and Representative
Burlingame of the American Civil
Liberties Union. AFECIGGE hopes.
to present a clear-cut difference
of opinion. The organization has
planned to hold rallies on. the
Diag. AFECIGGE decided to dis-
tribute anti-Goldwater leaflets,
and copies of Conscience of a
Conservative or other pro-Gold-
water literature at the rallies. The
consensus is that Goldwater is
his own worst enemy and his
literature is the best thing to
defeat him.
AFECIGGE plans to distribute
literature about Canadian edu-
cation. Canadian folk songs, and
general materials about Canadian
history and culture as well.

)utlines Clergy Issues
Campaign Rights Petition
Over sixty Ann Arbor and Uni-
Members of AFECIGGE stated versity clergy and religious lead-
6hat they do not advocate Ameri- ers met lase Saturday to sign a
can citizens taking out Canadian petition addressed to President
citizenship even if Goldwater gens Johnson. The clergy then read
elected. the drafted petition to their con-
The AFECIGGE members said gregations.
that they are loyal to the govern- The petition urges President
ment of the United States. The'; Johnson to continue persuading
group believes that the absurdity states to protect all the citizens
of the emigration movement will in their boundaries, but when law
"point out the utter laughability" enforcement fails, as it has in
of Goldwater's candidacy. Mississippi, to implement the fed-
AFECIGGE, a fairly new organ- eral laws already enacted.
ization on the Michigan campus, The petition was initiated by the
was formed just a few weeks ago, Ann Arbor Ministerial Association
but already has a membership of and the clergy have invited any
over 80 students. citizen to. sign this during the
coming week. The petition will
Debators W in rain in the offices of the
churhesrepresented, and next
Sunday will be the last, day to
Forensic Title twnl
Copies of the petition will be
The University novice debating forwarded to Johnson, as well as
team won the region five Delta acting Attorney General Nicholas
Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha for- Katzenbach, U.S. SenatorsiPhillip
ensic and discussion tournament Hart (D-Mich) and Patrick Mc-
with a first place finish by Jane Namara (D-Mich), state represen-
Mixer, '68. Another University par- tative George Meader (R-Mich),
ticipant, Jay Starkoff, '67, finish- Governor George Romney and the
ed ninth in the 60-man tourna- rivals of the respective incum-
ment. bents.

.:1 1

WHEN THE NEW maize and blue Michigan license plates go on
sale Nov. 2, :University President Harlan Hatcher (left) and
Prof. Charles Joiner of the law school (right) will receive these
to help note the University's 150th anniversary. President
Hatcher s marxs the University's founding date, while Prof.

Joiner's denotes the sesquicentennial year.

Africans Attend 'U' Educational Seminar

DA-Y-OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The UniVer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
N'otices may be published a mzaxi-
mum of two times on Request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20

Rackham Amphitheatre, 9 a.m.
Dept. of Anatomy Seminar - Col.
John Paul Stapp, Brooks Air Force
Base, R'Biodynamics of Decelerative
Forces": 4001 East Medical Bldg., 4 p.m.
Dept. of Classics Lecture-Emmeline
H. Richardson, Yale University, "The
Etruscans and Rome": Aud. B, Angell
Hall, 4 p.m.
School of Music Recital-Organ Ma-
jors at the University of Michigan:
Hill Aud., 4:15 p.m.
School of Music String Students Re-
itaRecital Hall. School of Music

Sorority membership requires nd
"more than just pledging a cer - Nine educational leaders from1
tam house. It requires commit- the United Republic, of Tangan-c
ment hotime and concernonm e yika and Zanzibar have arrived on.
part of the individual sorority campus for a three-week seminar.t
member for which she receives They are in the United Statest
the benefit of the relationship she on a two-month study tour under"
has in the group," Panhellenic the sponsorship of the Agency fort
Association President Ann Wick- International Development in co-
ins, '65, said last night. operation with the U.S. Office oft
Glamor Education.t
"Too often this aspect of sorori- The project for educational.
ties is glossed over, and in its leaders was organized to attain the
place, the glamor and the status government of Tanganyika's goal
of belonging to a particular house to expand technical training and
becomes more important," Miss to improve existing methods of
Wickins elaborated. evaluation. Objectives of the Tan-;
She said Panhel has recognized ganyikan educators during the
this to a certain extent in the two-month tour are to acquire (1)
past through abolishing the hon- a comprehensive understanding of,
or code which restricted contact the philosophy, organization and
between independents and affiliat- administration of industrial arts
ed women, opening the rushing and all vocational education in the
structure so that it is more in- U.S. and (2) a thorough acquaint-'
formal and natural and providing ance with the various methods of,
an open rushing period after for- appraisal used for U.S. grade'
mal rush. levels from kindergarten through
"All these are aimed at promot- college. Various phases of indus-;
ing more individual and personal trial training as administered or
contact with affiliated women," sponsored by federal, state, local,
Miss Wickins explained. and private agencies will be pre-
The major move Panhel has sented.
made in this direction has been * *
the instituting of a fall rush for Prof. Norman F. Miller, of the
upperclassmen. "This system al .!Medical School, was elected sec-
lows sororities to begin formal ond vice-president of the Ameri-,
rush in spring with part of their can College of Surgeons in Chi-
quota already fulfilled." cago recently.
"However, we have not suffi-
ciently solved our problems in
The University has been grant-
terms of rush, as evi'denced b ed $174,000 by the. National Sci-
the fact that some sororities are $174000 bFthedation rrsalci-
less successful than others in rush. ence Foundation for research in
Same Thingschemistry and mathematics. The
Theresh denogmathematical grant of $118,000
There should be no stigma at- will be under the direction of Prof.
tahuccessfuthesehouffer tha same George Piranian, while the chemi-
things in terms of group living and 2al investigation, which totals $56,-
interpersonal contact as the oth- 300, will be headed by Prof. Peter
er houses," Miss Wickins said. A. S. Smith.
a * *
"In fact, the group cohesionj'
and individual benefits derived ii Several University faculty mnem-
these chapters may be greater be- bers have recently authored books:

philosophy department is author American Hospital Association.
of "Philosophy of Language." His topic was "Hospital Liability
-Prof .Ronald Freedman, direc- and Immunity."
tor of the U-M Population Studies* * *
Center, has edited a book entitled TUESDAY, OCT. 20
"World Population: The Vital Rev- 8:30 a.m.-Edward Pickett of

olution. -
-Prof. John W. Atkinson of
the psychology department has au-
thored a book titled "An Intro-
duction to Motivation."
-Strange Ross, associate re-
search psychologist, has written
"Logical Foundations of Psycho-
logical Measurement."
A paper written by a member
and a former member of the In-
stitute of Science and Technol-
ogy was given in New York City,
at the fall meeting of the Opti-
cal Society of America. Authors of
the paper, "Spatial Filtering of
Signals with Additive Noise," are
Adam Kozma of the optical group
of the IST radar laboratory, and
D. L. Kelly, formerly with the
same unit.

the Control Data Corporation of
Minneapolis will speak on "Data
Processing and the Personnel
Function" at the Union.
9:30 a.m.-German organist Vol-
ker Gwinner will speak on "Im-
provisation, and the Church Serv-
ice" at Hill Aud.
4 p.m.-Col. John Paul Stapp,
scientist for the Aerospace Medi-
cal Division, will 'speak at a sem-
inar in 2501 East Medical Bldg.
4 p.m.-Prof. Emmeline H. Rich-
ardson of Yale University will
speak on "The Etruscans and
Rome" in Aud. B, Angell Hall.
4:15 p.m.--Organ majors at the
University will give a recital at
the School of Music.
7:30 p,m,-Theodore Newcomb
will discuss "The Student" at an
OSA Staff Seminar in Room 3511
SAB.

8 p.m.-Prof. Hans A. Bethe of
Cornell University will speak on
"Disarmament and Strategic Sta-
bility" for the fourth annual Dew-
ey F. Fagerburg Memorial Lecture1
in Rackham Lecture Hall.
8 p.m.-Office of Religious Af-
fairs will present a student forum
in discussion with Paul Tillich on
"Contemporary Man in Search of
Identity" in the Union Ballroom.
8 p.m.-The PTP presents the
APA in "Judith" at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-Visiting Prof. Julio
Cesar Caillet-Bois will talk in
Spanish on "La poesia Argentina
contemporanea," at 3050 Frieze
Bldg.
8:30 p.m.-Odeon Partos, direc-
tor of the Rubin Academy of Mu-
sic, Tel-Aviv University, will speak
on "The Problems of the Contem-
porary Israeli Composer" in the
Recital Hall, School of Music.

AT ANN ARBOR'S
NEWEST BOOKSTORE
FOR THE UNION DEAD
NEW POEMS BY
ROBERT LOWELL
contemporary literature
scholarly editions
in the humanities
french and german books
'7Tce nticore*-
'2AoL'n Aoei
1321 South University
between Forest & Washtenaw
OPEN ALL WEEK
noon to midnight

4

4

Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per Dept. of Psychiatry Lecture - Frank
sonnei Techniques Seminar - Edward Keisler, M.D., director, Northland
Mental Health Center, CnrlDtCopMne-iĀ«Inc., Grand
Plckett, Conro Data Crp., Minneap- Rapids Mim. "Programnming Prven-
oils, Minn., "Data Processing and the tion": Children's Psychiatric Hospita
Personnel Function':: Michigan Union, Aud., 8 p.m. s
8:30 a.m. _,_8_pm
Confrene o Oran usi--Rgisra- School of Music Doctoral Degree Re-
Conference on Oga Music-Registra- citai-Robert Town, organist: Hill Aud.:
tion, Hill Ad., 80a.m 8:30 p.m.

Dean William N. Hubbard, Jr. of WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21
the Medical School presented a pa 4 p.m.-Prof. Philip E. L. Smith
-per on "Grants Management and of the University of Toronto will
the Scientific Community" during speak on "Prehistoric Rock Draw-
the annual meeting of the Amer- ings from Egypt: Implications for
ican Public Health Association in North African Art" in Aud. B, An-
New York City recently. Hubbard's gell Hall.
address was part of a session on 4:10 p.m.-Paul Tillich, theol-
"Management of Federal Grants- ogian of the University of Chi-
in-Aid for Health and Research." cago will speak on "Grounds for
* * * Moral Choice in a Pluralistic So-
Prof. Arthur F. Southwick, Jr. ciety" in Rackham Aud.
of the business administration - - - -- _---
school delivered a paper recently
in Chicago before an Institute on
Hospital Law sponsored by the SOPH SH4
BLOCK TICKET SA[

BIG
SALE
PHOTO
DEPARTMENT
AT
FO LLETT'S

ow
ES

Landscape Design Study Course -
DIAL 8-6416
EXCLUSIVE
ENGAGEMENT

Teaching Series: Given by Dr. Frank
Koen (from the Center for Research
on Learning and Teaching), Tues., Oct.
20, at 8 p.m. in Room 1200, Chemistry
Bldg.
General Notices
Joint Judiciary Council: Petitioning
begins Oct. 16. 1964 for five student
members of the Joint Judiciary Coun-
cil. Deadline date, Oct. 30, 1964. Inter-
viewing time and place will be an-
I nounced at a later date. Petitions are
available in Room 1011 SAB.
Final Payment of Fall Semester Fees
is due and payable on or before Oct. 30,
1964.
If fees are not paid by this date:
1) A $10.00 delinquent penalty will be
charged.
2) A "Hold Credit" will be placed
against you. This means that until pay-
ment is received and "Hold Credit" is
cancelled:
(1) Grades will not be mailed.
(2) Transcripts will not be furnished.
(3) You may not register for future
semesters.
(4) A Senior may not graduate with
his class at the close of the current
semester.
3) The Dean of your school or college
will be given a list of delinquent ac-
counts.
Payments may be matte in person, or
mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015 Ad-
ministration Bldg., before 4:30 p.m., Oct.
C d30, 1t64.
}(Continued on Page 8)

l

cause of their smaller size. Some -Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld,
of the larger chapters have ex- chairman of the political science
pressed concern over their num- department, has written "Politi-
bers have intentionally set their cal Parties: A Behavioral Analy-
rushing quotas below house ca- sis."
pacity." -Prof. William P. Alston of the

i
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a
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Dial 662-6264

--ENDING TODAY-
WALT DISNEY'S
"SO DEAR TO MY HEART"

FHN'AHUGUENY-AAMS-WALLE
THURSDAY-
"ONE POTATO,
TWO POTATO"

STARTS WEDNESDAY
- EX
ON ~
Pit
SS
Sc
COLUMI
FAI
A MAXI
SIDNEY

.dIo

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1,3, 5, 7 and 9:10 P.M.
Come on
tcut in on
of the
-andf
z 1've got
takes...
A SURGEON S LAMP A LEATHER VEST
A SUCTION CUP A BOY-SCOUT KNOT
MR[INA PETER MAIMA
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COLOR
jwhere the elss

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Starling October 23rd

DIAG RALLY
Wednesday & Thursday
Noon
Prices: $1.25 on Thursday
$1.75 on Friday and Saturday
TRANSPORTATION PROVIDED

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PLODES
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4i "40el A

I

Paul Taylor Dance Company

presented by
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
FRIDAY, OCT. 23, 8:30

OCTOBER 21-25,
TAGE JU D IT H

THE HS

i

rfIFsMM

American Premiere!

F

by Brendan Behan'

War & Peace-The Hostage-Judith-Man & Superman
-A Symposium

1

I

11

MODERN DANCE PROG
includes "Aureole"
(Handel), Duet (Haydn)
Three Epitaphs
(music by Laneville-
Johnson Union Brass
Band) ; Junction (Bac
and "Party Mix"
(Sonata for Two Piano
by Alexi Haieff).

IN RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
RAM "Just when the modern dance seems to be slipping into the dull
era of middle age, along comes a new crop of choreographers
brimfull of new ideas: one of the most stimulating is Paul Taylor."
-Christian Science Monitor
"The Paul Taylor Dance Company appeared in the Berlin Academy
of Arts and enraptured us."
-Nacht Depesche (Berlin, Germany)
"The Paul Taylor Dance Company, a remarkable American troupe,
is currently the guest of the Theatre of Nations, onto whose stage
h) ; it brings a truly new contribtion to the art of choreography."
-Tribune de Dausanne (Paris, Fance)
)S "The American theatre is in luck to have such gifted artists as its
ambassadors." -Paris Herald Tribune
TICKETS: $3.50-$2.50-$2.00

FEATURING:

Directed by Stephen Porter

by Jean Giraudoux
Directed by Ellis Rabb

Professor Richard J. Burgwin
Theater Director, Department of Speech
Professor Marvin Felheim
Lecturer, Critic, Department of English

I

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