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October 20, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-20

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1964

THE MICHIANaJAILYa

TUESDAY, CTOBER 20 1964 TII\)L'11\EAN UbALi

PAGE THREF

i

Laborite Cabinet China Seeks Spokesman Role

Face s Problm
London Dock Strike Perils Trade;
Steels Lead Stock Market Decline
LONDON (P-Prime Minister Harold Wilson called his first cab-
inet together yesterday under the threat of a dock strike and falling
prices on the stock market.
At the same time, Wilson moved to cement ties with the United
States by agreeing to dispatch his foreign secretary, Patrick Gordon
Walker, to Washington for talks with Secretary of State Dean Rusk
Oct. 26 and 27.
With fears growing among businessmen that Wilson intended to
renationalize the steel industry, steel stocks led a downward slide on
the London Stock Exchange.
On the labor side, the dock workers voted to tie up the London port
with a one clay wildcat strike Thursday. There was a possibility of the

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press Special Correspondent
Red China, after traveling a
long, rocky road to a nuclear test
explosion, now can be expected to
mount a diplomatic drive to be-
come the nuclear club spokesman
for a "third world."
Peking's feat-no matter how
long it will take to acquire stock-
piles and delivery systems - is,
gloomy news for the West and
the Soviet Union.
Not only is the development like-
ly to increase tension between
Moscow and the Red Chinese, but
it also can step up the potential
of the Peking regime for trouble-
making.

an enhanced position to pursue
one of its major policy aims-cre-
ation of an "intermediate zone"-
a third world-which it envisions
as a bloc which regards the So-
viet Union and the United States
both with hostility.
In the non-white world, the
impact of the feat will be heavy.
Without Help
It is probably that what the Chi-
nese did was accomplished with-
out sigrfificant Soviet help. China's
do-it-yourself drive toward the nu-
clear club's door began in earn-
est in 1958. Since then the drive
has brought increasing estrange-
ment from Moscow, a widening
rift in the world Communist
movement and a quiet purge in-

PRIME MINISTER WILSON

World News
Roundu
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson said yesterday he
told congressional leaders he would
get the facts on the case of Wal-
ter Jenkins, his former trusted
lieutenant, who resigned after dis-
closure of two arrests on morals
charges.
WASHINGTON - The. Supreme
Court refused yesterday to rule
on a complaint by a group of
white parents in Brooklyn, N.Y.,
who said their children were as-
signed to a new junior high school
outside their home area on the
basis of race to bring about more
balanced integration.
* * *
NEW YORK-James P. Mitch-
ell, 63, who served almost eight
years as secretary of labor in the
Eisenhower administration, died
yesterday of a heart attack in his
hotel suite here.

stoppage spreading throughout'
the nation. The dockers demanded
another 25 shillings ($3.50) a week
--twice what employers are ready
to pay.
High Pressure
But the new Labor government's
three-man committee of econom-
ic experts-Wilson, economic boss
George Brown and Chancellor of
the Exchequer James Callaghan
--has worked at high pressure
throughout the weekend. Their
first emergency proposals to coun-
ter the worsening foreign trade
balance due to falling exports and
too many imports were expected
to get cabinet approval later.
Wilson has said he may explain
these things on television later in
the week.
Standby Credit,
The generalhimpression in
Whitehall is that Britain may
make early resort to .her standby
credit of 357 million pounds
($999.6 million) with the interna-
tional monetary fund. There may
be some new incentives for ex-
porters with restrictions on few-
er essential imports. The interest1
on bank loans might be increased.,
The announcement that Gordon
Walker would visit Washington
came after a meeting between the,
foreign secretary and U.S. Am-
bassador David K. Bruce. The aim
of the Washington talks, the an-
nouncement said, was to arrange
for a continuation of U.S.-British
cooperation.
Labor party officials were re-
ported highly pleased with Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson's remarks
in his nationwide address Sun-
day night about the new British
government.
Announcement
Said a foreign office announce-
ment on the Washington meet-
ing:
"The purpose of the meeting will1
be to give the two foreign min-
isters an early opportunity to re-i
view, matters of common interestF
and make arrangements for thet
continuing consultation which has(
been traditional between the two
countries.",

nAlready, ithe RexpCosion of side .Red China involvingV both
nuclear device, Red China is in Itheparty and the army.
Peking Plans All-Out Drive'
To Boost Nuclear Potential
HONG KONG (M)-Peking, happy with the success of its first
atomic test, will go all out now to boost its nuclear potential, special-
ists on Communist China said yesterday.
They expect Communist China to launch a nationwide economy
campaign soon to free more money and materials for further tests and
research.
Intelligence sources here estimate that Communist China's budget'
for its nuclear program is about $500 million a year. In 1950, one year
after the Communists seized pow- I

As long ago as 1950, shortly
after the revolution enveloped the
China mainland, Peking's nuclear
aspirations became a problem for
Moscow. Though Josef Stalin-for
anti-Soviet propaganda purposes-
now is given a place of honor by
Peking in the Red Pantheon, the
Soviet dictator seemed leery of
Chinese ambitions and suspicious
of such potential power on the
Soviet border.
Post-Stalin Era
In the post-Stalin era, Moscow
agreed to cooperate on peaceful'
uses of nuclear energy. The Chi-
nese sent scientists to the Dubna
Nuclear Research Center. But Pe-
king pressed constantly for help
on nuclear weapons technology, in-
cessantly urging the Russians to
recognize the Chinese need. They
sent a military delegation to Mos-
cow in 1957 to seek such help.
In 1958, anti-Russian Marshal.
Chen Yi, then foreign minister,
predicted publicly that China
would build her own nuclear weap-
on. But China still was far away
from the goal, and Mao called
the atomic bomb a "paper tiger,"
propounding the theory that man-
power would be the deciding fac-
tor in world politics. China had
plenty of that.
But the party leadership became
more enraged than ever with Mos-
cow when then-Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev suggested that Asia
be made a nuclear-free zone. The
Chinese in 1960 served notice they
would ignore any disarmament
agreement reached by the Soviet
Union and the West.
Russia Pulls Out
The split deepened. The Rus-
sians withdrew all their military
advisers and technicians. Chen Yi
defiantly reasserted the doctrine
of "reliance on one's own resourc-
es," and Peking boasted that it
was making strides toward over-
coming difficulties raised by
"modern revisionists'" refusal to
lend technical information.
In August, 1962, Chen Yi an-
nounced publicly that China was
devoting "tremendous" resources
to development of a nuclear bomb
which he said China wanted "for
the sole reason that the capital-
ists consider us underdeveloped
and defenseless as long as we lack
the ultimate weapon."

CITES IMPRO VEMENT:
Milliken Explains
State Growth, Policy

er in China, the budget for the en-
tire Department of Science was
only $1 million.
It jumped to nearly $100 mil-
lion in 1956 when Soviet scientists
and technicians started work on
nuclear reactors for the Commu-
nist Chinese.
Intelligence sources believe it
will jump dramatically again aft-
er the successful explosion last Fri-
day.
The economy campaign to raise
this money will mean more belt-
tightening and other hardships for
the Chinese masses.
Experts believe the campaign
will be a revival of the "g eat
leap forward" movement, the drive
initiated in 1958 to make Commu-'
nist China a leading industrial
world power quickly. This pro-
gram failed.
In Washington, officials expectj
the Chinese to explode a second
atomic device soon, but say it
will take 5 to 10 years for the Red
regime to become a nuclear power.
Red China handed governments
around the world a statement yes-
terday explaining why it had det-
onated its first atomic device and
calling for a summit conference
to ban all nuclear weapons.-
The statement, signed by Pre-+
mier Chou En-lai, was the same
as that issued Friday night by the
Chinese in announcing explosion
of the bomb. It said China had to4
go ahead with its program because
other nations had made tests.

By PHYLLIS KOCH
Sen. William G. Milliken (R-
'Traverse City), Republican can-
didate for lieutenant governor,
emphasized the problem of popu-
lation explosion and its relation
to state policy at a lecture in the
Law Club Lounge Thursday.
Michigan is "the fastest grow-
ing state in the midwest and
state policy must be framed with
reference to this problem, which
colors all the problems we are
wrestling with in Lansing," he
said.
Reorganization at the admin-
istrative level has accelerated
progress in Michigan'seducation
and mental health programs, Mil-
liken added. "We have made more
progress in the past two years in
education than at any other time.''
Educational Progress
This has been brought about
through the school reogranization
bill, the shift in support of edu-
cation to the state level and the
development of new programs of
technical education, he said. Un-
der the present Rep'ublican ad-
ministration, the education budget
has increased 20 per cent and
state scholarships are being of-
fered for the first time, he added.
Significant reorganization in
the area of mental health has
come through the naming of a
psychologist as the head of the
department and through the pass-
age of the New Community Public
Services Bill, encouraging the
local development of ;mental
health programs and the support
of state dollars, Milliken com-
mented.
"We have turned the corner of
mental health in Michigan, with
an increase of $9 million in the
.DlSaebter
BEAUTY SALON:
609 S. FOREST
Coll NO 8-8878
Evenings by Appointment A

present program," he said.
Milliken also noted the sub-
stantial progress made in the re-
tarded children's program. One
year ago there were 1800 children
on the waiting list; by November,
60 per cent of these children will
have been provided for, he said.
Leader in Economic Growth
"Michigan is now leading the
nation in economic growth," the
senator said. "The reasons for this
are sound, respectable fiscal
judgement, port bills, an improved
tax structure and the encourage-
ment of industries in the state.
Industry puts its money where
it has faith and Michigan now
has more plant expansions than
at any other peace time, with a
$1.5 billion announced investment
for the next six months," he said.
"This economic growth is not
all the result of the Republican
Party but the GOP is entitled to
much of the credit since the whole
image of Michigan has changed
under the past two years of Re-
publican administration. Some
people say that Michigan's eco-
nomic progress is just the result
of national growth, but then why
didn't Michigan keep pace in the
50's?" Milliken asked.
He went on to praise Governor
George Romney as "the greatest
bargain the state has ever had.

PEASANTS!

HARKEN

Watch!

Ye Old Witch
yonder on Diag

all day

CHOU EN-LAI
Johnson Seeks
End of Sik e
E WASHINGTON (OP) - President
Lyndon B. Johnson said yesterday
continuation of the General Mo-
tors strike "will jeopardize the
continuous upward thrust of our
economy."
Johnson prodded GM officers
and officials of the striking Unit-
ed Auto Workers to try to reach
an agreement as speedily as pos-
sible.

Thursday

I

COMING WEDNESDAY

I

OCTOBER 21

need
a
great
looking
dress
for
Home-'
coming
.
4
22

f
Top: here's a Lanz
dress in white wool
with a low back
and white embroidered
flowers on the skirt.
40.00
Bottom: a little
black dress by
Lanz in wool
with a bare back
outlined in loopy yarn.
30.00
of course, if it's
a long dress you're
hankering for-
we've got 'em
in all shapes and sizes.
Main Floor

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT.:
"A MISSISSIPPI SUMMER"

i

JOINT JUDICIARY COUNCIL
Petitioning now open
October 16th to 30th, 1964

Leader: Diane Runk'e

For reservations,
call 668-6076.

Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

Petitions available in
room 1011 Student Activities
Building

Five vacancies
to be filled.

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MAN-TAI LOREDr
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IEEDY PATTERNS
SIZES 8 to 16 4

TILLICH-OCT. 21:
4:10 P.M.
RACKHAM LECTURE
HALL
"Grounds for Moral Choice
in a Pluralistic Society"
8:00 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION
BALLROOM
"Contemporary Man in
Search of Identity",
(Open Forum with students:
James Helm, Marion Fin-
ley, Barbara Nadal, and
Suzanne Naiburg; N. Pat-
rick Murray, Ph.D., modera-
tor.)

PAUL TIL.LICH
Professor of Theology,
formerly of Harvard University,
now at The University of Chicago
"PERHAPS THE GREATEST MIND
OF THE 20TH CENTURY"
Tillich on the meaning of "God";
The name of this infinite and inexhaustible ground of
history is God. That is what the word means, and it is
that to which the words "Kingdom of God" and
"Divine Providence" point. And if these words do not
have much meaning for you, translate them, and speak
of the depth of history, of the ground and aim of our
social life and, of what you take seriously without
reservation in your moral and political activities. Per-
hops you should call this depth "hope," simply hope,
for if you find hope in the ground of history, you are
united with the great prophets who were able to look
into the depth of their times, who tried to escape it,
because they could not stand the horror of their visions,
and who yet had the strength to look to an even
deeper level and there to discover hope. -
-Shaking of the Foundations

I

1

COMING OCT. 27-29:
PAUL VAN BUREN
Theologian, Temple University

uan Buren on the
"Problem of 'God'":

SLACSK

1

AND TW

VAN BUREN-OCT.27-29:
"The Challenge of
Contemporary to
Traditional Theology"
3 lectures: "Honesty,"
"Clarity," and "Secularity"

The theological "left" has urged us to think through
Christian faith in the light of the critique of modern
thought . . . we would take this demand seriously. It
will not do simply to translate the different word "God"
into some highly or subtly qualified phrase such as "our
ultimate concern," or worse, "transcendent reality," or
even, "the ground and end of all things." These
expressions are masquerading as empirical name tags,
and they are used as though they referred to something
they put us in the worse situation of speaking a

Watch for future details.

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