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October 17, 1964 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-17

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f

PAGE TWO

TIlE MICH IGAN DA ILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17.1964

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Political Groups Plan Nov. Action

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| DAILY OF FICIAL BUL LE TIN
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an members of the Joint Judiciary Coun- Birmingham, Mich.-Sec., Audlo-Vis- with at least 2 yrs. experience.
official publication of The Univer- cii. Deadline date, Oct. 30, 1964. Inter- ual/Lib.; Ind. Arts-Comb, woods & Tomahawk. l.JH nlg/o~n
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YR's To Continue,
Campus Activity
By JUDITH KOBAK
The Young . Republicans' on-
campus activity for the November
election will include a speaker
program, pamphlet distribution
and voter registration, chairman'
Berge Gregian, Grad, said re-
cently.
Specifically, the YRs will pass
out Republican literature at large
public gatherings such as football
games, hand out stickers n the
Stadium parking lot, bring in Re-
publican speakers such as Gov.
George Romney and contact Re-
publican students of voting age
to help them register and obtain
absentee ballots.
The YRs are presently canvass-
ing two Ann Arbor precincts cov-
ering about 2500 people, Dale
Warner, Grad, chairman of the
Michigan Federation of College
Republicans, said. They seek to
determine the political prefer-
ences of the voter, urge Republi-
cans to register and try to make
sure Republican voters in those
precincts get to the polls on elec-
tion day.
Voter Services
Club members will also help
voters in the two precincts on
election day by supplying baby
sitters so Republicans can get out
and vote.
Although the YRs are pledged
to work for all Republican candi-
dates, the club is divided into
several "Students for . . . com-
mittees. Thus, members may work
specifically for Sen. Barry Gold-
water (R-Ariz), Romney, second
congressional district Rep. George
Meader (R-Mich), Mrs. Ely Peter-
son, U.S. Senate candidate and
Gilbert E. Bursley (R-Ann Arbor),
running for the state Senate in
the 33rd district.
According to Gregian, in non-
election years the YRs work to ed-
ucate members in party philosophy
so they may take an active part
in Republican politics in their own
towns. The club holds seminars
and workshops, as well as bring-
ing political speakers to the
campus.
SGC Endorsement
The YRs participate in campus
politics by endorsing students run-
ning for Student Government
Council The club supports those
students for SGC who hold the
view of the Republican party,
Gregian said. To be endorsed, the
candidate need not be a member
of the YRs, however.
Across
Campus
Two prominent Soviet mathe-
maticians, E. F. Mshchenko and
R. V. Gamkrelidze are visiting the
mathematics department and the
Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy during the fall term. Jointly
sponsored by the IST and the
National Science Foundation, they
will give special lectures and take
part in an interdepartmental
seminar.
Both mathematicians are re-
cipients of the Lenin Prize for
Science and Technology. Mish-
.chenko is vice-director of the
Steklov Mathematical Institute
where Gamkrelidze is a senior
member.
SATURDAY, OCT.17
10 a.m.-The High School De-
bate Assembly sponsored by the
University Speech Department will
open at Rackham Lecture Hall.
5 p.m. and 9 p.m.-The PT will
present the APA in "War and
Pece" at Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present Charlie Chaplin in "Mod-

em Times."
SUNDAY, OCT. 18
3 p.m.--School of Music Stu-
dents of the wind instruments
department will give a recital in
the Recital Hall, School of Music
Bldg. on North Campus.
3 p.m. and 8 p.m.-The PTP
presents the APA in "Judith" in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
LAST
NIGHT
"The Best Man"
8:00 p.m.
Tryeblood Auditorium
Tickets at Box Office
10a.m. 'tfiiCurtain
on AACT Production

In addition to the several'tu- YD S Aim FOr
dents for . . ." committees, the
YRs have regular standing com- I Ce l l
mittees: education, membership, kmae a ilage
campaign and publicity. A YR
newsletter is published every three By NEIL SHISTER
weeks._

Y

r...w.

Operating costs are covered
through the club's $2 membership
fee. Most campaign literature is'
distributed free of charge, except
for books written by the candi-
dates.

The goal of the Young Demo-
crats is to change the general
image of ineffectiveness and leth-
argy which characterizes most
student political groups," Mike
Grondin, '66, club president, said'
recently.
With 250 members, the largest
in the group's history, the YDs
are currently engaged in a vigor-
ous program of political action.
Their "First Vote" voter registra-
tion drive has contacted potential
new voters and aided in the reg-
istration of over 1000 students
eligible to vote for the first time
this election, Grondin said.
Voter Registration
The Political Action Committee,
with 100 members, each working
nearly eight hours a week, can-
vassed the Ypsilanti, Monroe and
Ann Arbor areas getting qualified
voters registered. In - the Fifth
Ward of Ann Arbor alone, the
YDs have registered 150 voters,
Grondin continued.
On election day, the group
hopes to provide workers for al-
most 100 of Michigan's 5200 pre-
cincts, he said. The other activity
of these members will be helping
"hesitant" voters get to the polls
by providing transportation and
baby sitters on request.
Political education as well as
action is a vital part of the YDs
program, Grondin emphasized.
The political education committee
maintains an extensive file of in-
formation on national and state
issues obtained from the Demo-
cratic National Committee, the
AFL-CIO and newspapers and
periodicals.
Party Speakers
The YDs speaker's bureau sends
speakers to housing units and
other student groups for discus-
sion or debate. They have also
brought speakers tothecampus,
notably John Kenneth Galbraith,
Harvard economist; Congressman-
at-large Neil Staebler, candidate
for governor, and Wes Vivian and
John Dingell, both candidates for
the United States House of Rep-
resentatives.

the 89th Congress, the Southern
liberal and the "crisis in American
foreign policy" is also planned,
Grondin said.
The YDs, he added, are now
'out to shoot the bull and shoot
the elephants!"
,
Grllet Explains
'New Novels'
(Continued from Page 1)
engaged. His narrative is sub-
jective; he deforms reality inI
creating it. But this appears to be
objective." Grillet said.
Where is the reality in these,
books? Grillet replied that there,
is a subjective reality. The de-
scription is impartial, but be-
cause it comes from the interior,'
the view of the exterior world is
wbiased.The modern writerde-
scribes what he sees, but, unlike
Balzac, he does not try to trans-
Late the exterior world.,
Change in DescriptionI
The role of description has also
changed since Blazac's era, Grillet
said, giving as an example "The
Voyeur." This book begins by a
long description 'of a boat, its
movement and surroundings. "Sev-,
eral words would have been suf-
ficient, but the description con-
tinues for pages, confounding and
contradicting itself until the read-
er realizes that he no longer sees1
anything at all.j
Grillet believes this doubleI

sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to

Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be- Lecture: The Ann Arbor Society, Ar-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding chaeological Institute of America, and
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday the Dept. of Classical Studies announce,
for Saturday and Sunday. General an illustrated lecture by Emeline Hill
Notices may be published a maxi- Richardson, former lecturer at Yale
mum of two times on Request; Day and Stanford, in Aud. 2BAngell Hall,
Calendar items appear once only. 4:10 p.m. on Tues., Oct. 20, on "The
Student organization notices are not Etruscans in Rome."
accepted for publication.
Dept. of Engineering Mechanics Sem-
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 inar: Will sponsor Dr. William P. Grae-
-_____ bel, assoc. prof. engineering mechanics,
who will present, "Drag Reduction by
+IINon-Newtonian Additives," Mon., Oct.
D f d L a 19, 4 p.m., 311 W. Engrg.
University Medical Center Alumni Doctoral Examination for Conrado de
Conference-Medical Science Bldg., 11 Regla Santos, Political Science; thesis:
a.m. "A Formulation of the Concept of Au-
thority in Political and Bureaucratic
Football-U-M vs. Purdue: Michigan Terms," Mon., Oct. 19, 4609 Haven
Stadium, 1:30 p.m. Hall, at 3 p.m. Chairman, Ferrel Heady.

viewing time and place will be an-
nounced at a later date. Petitions are
available in Room 1011 SAB.

Cinema Guild - Charlie Chaplin's
"Modern Times": Architecture Aud., 7

metals; Ind.
Teacher.

Arts/Science; Visiting

Studies.
*

"laement

For additional information contact
Flint, Mich.-Sec., Common Learnings the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
(Hist. & Engl. background necessary, 764-7462.
Home Ec.; Ind. Arts (drawing or wood--_
shop background needed); Elem. - ENGINEERING PLACEME NT INT'ER-
Remedial Reading; Special Education ViEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
'A." sign interview schedules posted at 128-H
Jackson, Mich.-Teacher-Counselor for West Engrg. for appointments with the
Ph~ys. Hand. (elem.); Teacher-Counselor f Ollow2ng
for Blind (sec.; School Social Workers; CT.20
Speech Corr. I Cities Service Research & Dev. Co.,
Tulsa. Okla,-PhD: ChE & EM. Can
Traverse City, Mich. (State Hospital) consider non-citizens if becoming a
-Certified Special Ed. - Emotionally citizen. Res.
Dist. OCT. 20-21-
Park Forest, Ill. (Rich Twp.) - Art? Douglas Aircraft Co., Inc., Calif. &
(man preferred). 'la.-Al1 Degrees: AE & Astro., CE, EE,
EM, ME, Physics. MS-PhD: ChE, Com-
Newark, N.J. (Commission for the munication Sci., Instru., Mat'Is & Met.
Blind)--Teachers of the blind and par- & Math. Prof.: Applied Mech. Men &
tially seeing. women. Can consider non-citizens at
Oradell, N.J. - Guidance counselor PhD level only. R. & D., Des., Test. &
Analysis.
OCT. 20-
RGA N IZA TION Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, d.
0 ~ ' N L I 0-ES: ChE, IE & ME. Dev., Prod.&
Systems.
Merck & Co., Inc., Eastern locations
N'TCE citiens ,if becoming a U.S. citizen.
NCh.cR. & D. & rod.
OCT. 20-21-
Use of This Column for Announce- Procter & Gamble Co., Oct. 20-Idale,
meats is available to officially recog- Eng. Div. & International; Oct. 21-
nized and registered student organi- R. & D. & Id. Eng. Div.-All De-
zations only. Forms are available in grees: ChE & IE. BS-MS: CE-(plant
Room 1011 SAl. only), EF, ME, Met., EE, Math & Chem.
* * * BS: E Math. MS: Instru. Can consider
Alpha Phi Omega, Executive Board non-citizens for positions in foreign
meeing Oc. 1, 2p.m., Room 3510 SAB. locations. R. & D., Des., Prod., Ind.
meet ng, Oct. 18, Eng. International.
Guild House, After game cider and OCT. 20--
donuts, Oct. 17, after game, Guild Spartan Electronics, Jackson, Mich.-
House, 802 Monroe. BS-MS: EE, EM. BS: E Physics & IE.
India Students Association, Hindu United States Steel Corp., Through-
movie, Bimal Roy's "Usne Kaha Tha,"MEt& e. S-PhDegr s: ChE CE EE,
at 7 pm. on Sat., Oct. 17, Aud. A IE. Can consider Venezuelan citizens
Ane l * for Orinoco Mining, Venezuela. R. &
D., Des. & Prod.

POSITION OPENINGS:
Debate Assembly: The Speech Depart- Farm Bureau Insurance, Lansing -
ment will sponsor the Debate Assem- Programmer. Male or female grad with
bly for Michigan High Schools on Sat., programming trng. Exper. on 1401 pref.
Oct. 17, 9 to 3, Rackham Lecture Hall. Immed. opening.
State of Michigan-Adult Corrections
School of Music Honors Program: Trainee. Male grad, 21-45 yrs., with
Applications are now being received bkgd. in soc., psych., ed., or related
for the second term (Spring, 1965). field. Counsel & supervise prison in-
Forms are available in the School of mates, parolees, etc. Locations-Jack-
Music Reception Office. Deadline for son, Ionia, Traverse City & Detroit.
receipt of applications and supporting Detroit Public Schools - Sr. Ass't.
statements by the Honors Council: Mechanical Engineer (Design), BSME,
Mon., Nov. 2. - exper. in preparing designs & specifi-
cations. Pref. some field work In ME
Doctoral Examination for Bernard IDeadline Oct. 30.
Keith Waldrop, Comparative Literature; ra.,T
thesis: "Aesthetic Uses of Obscenity Veterans Admin. Hospital, Tucson, I
in Literature," Sat., Oct. 17, 848 E. Uni- Ariz.-Physical Therapist (Certified) fori
versity, at 9:30 a.m. Chairman, Austin Physical Med. & Rehabil. staff.
Warren. ** *

PROF. RICHARD WEAVER
Conservationist
Weaver Dies
Prof. Richard L. Weaver of the
natural resources school died yes-
terday of an apparent heart sei-
zure. He was 53 years old.
The nationally known authority
on resource use and conservation
education was stricken while
speaking to a weekly luncheon
group on one of his favorite in-
terests-the development of con-
servation education in the United
States, a field he helped .pioneer.
Weaver, born in Pennsylvania,
received his B.S. degree from
Pennsylvania State College and
his doctorate from Cornell Uni-
versity. He was one of the first
class of four students at Cornell
to specialize in conservation edu-
cation.
After leaving Cornell, Weaver
was college naturalist at Dart-
mouth College, extension special-
ist and professor of biology at the
University of New Hampshire and
director of the Audubon Nature
Center, Greenwich, Conn. From
1947-52, he was an adviser in
resource use with the North Caro-
lina Department of Public Instruc-
tion, where he contributed to the
movement to reclaim southern
lands. He came to Michigan in
1952.
Weaver received the Nash Con-
servation Award in 1957 for 20
years of leadership in conserva-
tion education. Author of texts
and articles, he was a member of
the National Association of Biol-
ogy Teachers, serving as its presi-
dent in 1951 and for several years
as a leader of its conservation pro-
ject. In 1961 he was appointed a
member of the education commis-
sion of the International Union
for Conservation of Nature and
Natural Resources.
DIAL 5-6290
All days except Sunday
Shows at 1, 3, 7 and 9:05

?

movement of description and de-
struction, in which the decor-Is Medical College Admission Test: Can-
annulled and erased, is realIn; didates who are registered to take
asnmuhed and eorae, sporealinjthe Medical College Admission Test on'
as much as it corresponds to Oct. 17 are asked to report to 130
reality. Business Administration Bldg. on Sat-
The impact of this modern form urday morning at 8:30 a.m.
is apparent in "Last Year at'
Marienbad," Grillet said. Here the i ;e eral Notices
principal character is not the1
hero or the heroine but the au- Joint Judiciary Council: Petitioning
thor, in whose mind al the action begins Oct. 16, 1964 for five student
takes place. And when the action-
takes place in the minds of the
viewers, they become the prin-y.
cipal personalities. Do you know Q . .
"The role of man is to invent ,
his w'orld. In this invention there the CommuniSt
is also destruction. Thus the

F'or further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have recorded
vacancies for the present school semes-
ter:
Alpena, Mich. - Speech & Hearing
Therapist; Spec. Ed.--Retarded.
Battle Creek, Mich. (St. Phillip's) -
Commercial (Short. & Type.))/Math.

Young Democrats, Parade, rally, En-
gin. Arch, 7:30 p.m., Oct. 19; speech
by Sen. Philip Hart,, League Mall, 8
p.m.
Canterbury House, Sunday snacks
discussion, Sun., Oct. 18, 8 p.m., Rev.
Charles Miller speaking of his work
in Mississippi this summer, Canterbury
House, 218 N. Division.

Rped and Use
aifly (Isy ifeI (

I
I
I

,i

Snoveau sroman has a pedagogic
role-teaching man to live."

Viewpint'

A series of post-election sym-
posiums, featuring prominent law-
makers and journalists and deal- DIAL 26264
ing with such contemporary po-
litical problems as the future of'
_. O TRUE1TO 1IMFE

What's at stake in '64?
Peace, Democracy,
Jobs and YOUR security.

--- ----------------------=---------------- ummm n-m mm===m mmmm=m= ur =m --mmmmm
1 M
Charlie Chaplin Tonight and Tomorrow
i
I
1 U
For Program information
I i
* U
11\1 THIIE A RC H IT ECTULR E A UD ITO RIUM
* I
, 1ADMISSIDNFI=TY CENTS
* Iww "w w rw r" w" ""w"w w"""w"w w"""s w w ww"w""""*

"Election Day
For Youth"

Crossroads

!£Vi KV G

1 t.1 t..tt" C "

DIAL 8-6416

EXCLUSIVE
ENGAGEMENT

i'll feel
as lived
nade! *
:.:,
**"
S"
imcu."
"l rd~u~
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write to:
COMMUNIST VIEWPOINT
23 W. 26th St. 5c
New York, N.Y.

V A~O Dlt 5,
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FRONTIER BEEF BUFFET
Cafeteria Open 7 Days
Sun.-Thurs. 11:30 A.M.-8:00 P.M.
Friday and Saturday until 8:30 P.M,

OLD HEIDELBERG

A follow up to
--ROC KWIELLm-
Alain Resna is
"NIGH T AND FOG"
--a powerful commentary
on concentration camps
2 SHOWS-7:00 & 8:00
MON., OCT. 19

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NO 8-9753

2333 E. STADIUM

663-9165

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served with salad, potatoes and bread
CHAR-BROILED HAMBURGER
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Directed by Ellis Rabb

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665-7003
OPEN EVERY DAY 7:30 A.M.-12 P.M.
"Finle Food in Fi'ne SurroZin dini gs"

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