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September 15, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

enate Compromise Seen

r.

Pope Promises Christian Unity

Pope Paul VI celebrate4 mass yesterday with 24 bishops (foreground) during the opening ceremony
of the third session of the Ecumenical Council held in St. Peter's Baeilica. He later assured the non-
Catholic Christian world that it is his purpose to clear away all obstacles, misunderstandings and
hesitancy blocking Christian unity.,
N.Y. SCHOOL PROTEST:
W ite Boycott Cuts Attendance

NEW YORK (I)-More than a
million youngsters were summon-
ed back to New York's public
schools yesterday, but attendanc
was cut by a parents' boycott
against the busing of children tc
achieve racial integration.
The board of education reported ;
275,638 students absent from class-
rooms-some 175,000 above the
normal 10 per cent absenteeism on
an opening day of school. The fig-
ure for yesterday was 27 per cent.
White parents' groups which
sponsored the planned two-day
boycott had predicted 250,000 pu-
pils would take part. Last winter
racial integrationists kept almost
half the 1.05 million students away.
in one boycott and 267,000 away
in a second.
Citizen Protest
The boycott was called to pro-
test a board of education pilot
plan for speeding racial integra=
tion in public schools by busing
some children away from their
regular neighborhood schools. Pa-
rochial schools with 375,000 at-
tendance were not involved. '
Abstenteeism in the handful of
paired schools whose pupils were
bused ranged from 18 to 65 per
cent. By contrast, however, Har-
lem schools, which are predomi-
nantly Negro, reported normal at-.
tendance. And at non-affected P.S
112 in Brooklyn, virtually al?
NASA Delay
Gemini Project
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (A) -
The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration made it1 of-
ficial yesterday that there will be
no manned flight in Project Gem-
ini this year because of lightning
and hurricanes..
It said astronauts Virgil L.
Grissom and John W Young will
wait until the first quarter of
1965 to make their planned three-
orbit flight. This means a delay
of a month or .two from the De-
cember schedule.
George E. Mueller, NASA asso-
ciate administrator for manned
space flight, gave three reasons"
for the delay: a lightning strike-
that damaged a Titan 2 rocket on
Aug. 17 and hurricanes Cleoand
Dora.,
The rocket was being groomed
for the final unmanned flight in
the Gemini program, an attempt
scheduled for late September tc
propel a fully-equipped spacecraft
on a ballistic .ride to exaluate re-
entry and recovery techniques.

white, hardly a pupil showed up.
and classrooms stood empty.
The boycott threatened the cite
with a $2.2 million loss in state
aid. It is based on daily attend-
ance figures over a prescribed
.period of time.
State Aid Loss
School Superintendent' Calvir,
Gross said a technicality would
spare the city any penalty for the
opening day boycott. But he add-
ed that if it is repeated today,
as planned, the loss in state aid
could result.
The New York Times reported
that both candidates in the sena-
torial election in New York have
come out against the long-dis-
tance busing feature of the board's
plan.
Robert J. Kennedy, the former
U.S. attorney general, made his
opposition clear during statewide
campaigning last week..Sen. Ken-
neth Keating (R-NY) reiterated
his viewpoint on television Sun-
day when he said: "I'm against
long-distance busing" because it
is compulsory,
Board members reportedly is-
sued heated reports against the
candidates for turning an "edu-
cational matter" into a "politica?
issue."
Wagner Stays Out
At city hall, Mayor Robe3't F
Wagner reiterated his opposition
to the boycott but kept hands off
He told newsmen:,
"There is nothing I can do at
this point s ..,It is in the jurisdic-
tioni of the board of education."
There is no legal segregation
in New York public schools. How-
ever, neighborhood racial pat-
terns make some schools nearlyt
all-Negro and Puetro Rican an
others virtually all white. There
are over 400,000 Negro and Puertc

Rican children in the system.
. In response to growing pres-
sure from civil rights groups, the
board of education this term
launched a pilot plan to exchange
pupils between certain heavily Ne-
gro schools and. heavily white ones
in the same general area.
GOf P Protests
Smear TacticsE
On Goldater
WASHINGTON (A') - The Re-
publican National Committees pro-
tested formally yesterday what it
called horror-type television cam-
paign commercials being used b3
the Democrats to "smear" Sen
Barry Goldwater.
GOP Chairman Dean Burc~
specifically singled out to Charles
P. Taft, chairman of the fair
campaign practices committee, e
slot commercial which he and
other Republicans had complain'
ed about informally last week.
The spot shows a small girl
pulling daisy petals and counting
As she reaches 10, a voice in the
background counts down and a
nuclear explosion is shown at
zero. A phrase by President Lyn-
don B. Johnson from a speech i.
heard. Then there is a call for
Johnson's election in November.
Burch said this is an attack
on Goldwater "designed to grousc
basic emotions and has no placf
in this campaign."
He said there had been thou-
hands of complaints throughout
the country about the commer-
cial.

Would Clinch
Forein Aid
Bill Passage-
Vote Is Scheduled
For This Afternoon
WASHINGTON ()-Opponents
of a controversial proposal to de-
lay for a year or more court-or-
dered reapportionment of state
legislatures reached i n f o r m a 1
agreement last night on a com-
promise substitute.
Its acceptance by the Senate
would smooth the passage of Pres-
ident Lyndon B. Johnson's $3.3
billion foreign aid bill, and re-
move a major obstacle to ad-
journment of Congress.
It will be submitted today fol-
lowing a late-night round of con-
ferences which ironed out the spe-
cific language. A vote is schedul-
ed for this afternoon.;
Dlrksen Proposal
The reapportionment battle ha
been raging recently over a pro-
posal by Senate Republican Lead-
er Everett Dirksen. This measur
seeks to hold up reapportionment
of seats in .both houses of state
legislatures on a population basis
as prescribed by the Suprem
Court. It has tied up the Senate
for more than a month.
Dirksen offered it as a rider tc
the foreign aid authorization bil'
In a strategy to avoid any presi-
dential veto.,
In an effort to break the stale-
mate, Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey
(D-Minn), his party's vice-presi-
dential nominee, backed a substi-
tute to make it "the sense of Con-
gress" that the courts should al-
low "adequate time"to the state
either to comply with' the ruling
or allow the voters to pass on a
constitutional amendment by ref.
erendum.
Filibuster
Sen. Paul H. Douglas (D-Ill),
leader of the Democratic liberal
who have been leading a talka-
thon to prevent a vote on the
Dirksen rider, told the Senate yes-
terday that the substitute war
"unacceptable" in the form offer-
ed.
As drafted it would allow the
state "adequate time" to:
-Comply with the Supreme
Court ruling or
-For consideration of a pro-
posed constitutional amendment
Ccngress would submit.-
Shortly after the floor ex-
change, however, sponsors of th
compromise agreed to eliminate
.What Douglas called a "pledge'
that Congress would submit such
an amendment.
At the suggestion of the lib-
erals, the sponsors-Sens. Jacolz
K. Javits (R-NY) and Eugene J
McCarthy (D-Minn)-agreed to
change the first part of th(
amendment to make It allow "rea-:
sonable time" to comply with th
court amendment.

To Hear
ord id
DETROIT (i') -- The United
Auto Workers were still awaiting
an economic offer from the Ford
Motor Co. last night before decid-
ing whether to set a strike dead-
line in negotiations over a new
contract.
UAW President Walter Reuther
told newsmen earlier in the day
that Ford was doing some "home-
work" and the union was standing
by.
Both Reuther and Ford Vice-
President Malcolm .Denise, the
company's chief negotiator, ex-
pressed hope as they entered the
meeting that an agreement might
be reached without the pressure of
a strike deadline.
Reuther said that if "meaning-
ful progress" is being made at the.
bargaining table, there would be
no necessity for setting a time
and day by which a settlement
must be reached to avoid a walk-
out of some 125,000' Ford workers,
The UAW chieftain said he
would settle for nothing less than
the economic package negotiated'
last week with Chrysler Corp.
This included pensions of up;
to $400 a month as an early re-
tirenment incentive, longer vacas-
tions, two added holidays, increas-
ed medical and hospital blenefit
and other fringes.
The Chrysler. agreement also.
called for an increase- in relief
time for some workers from the
present 24 minutes a day to 3E
minutes.
Tr~ditionally, the first settle-
ment reached in negotiations sets'
the pattern for the remainder of
the auto industry.
The current three-year contract
between Ford and the UAW orig-
inally was due to expire at the'
end of last month. But it has
been extended until 12:01ge a.m.
Tuesday by mutual agreement.

segregation here in 1962.
The university said Cleveland
Donald, who began his freshman
work during the summer term, was
joined today by Irvin Walker, an-
other freshman, from Jackson.
"Nobody paid any attention to
them," said Pat Smith, director of
the university news service.
No other Negroes were expected
to appear for the fall term
* * *
DOVER, England (A)-Prime
Minister Sir Alec Douglas-Home
said yesterday Britain .would sur-
,render. forever .her status as "an
important, power if she abandoned
her separate nuclear deterrent.
He made a blistering political
attack on the opposition Labor.
Party's nuclear policies and then
left by plane for Scotland to in-
form Queen Elizabeth II. at Bal-
moral Castle of the date of the
national elections."
The election is expected to come
Thursday, Oct. 15. Nuclear policy
decisions already. are shaping; up
as theimportantforeign policy
issue.

' JB
} 1

WHAT DOES YOUR ROOM NEED?
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Coff ee mugs ... Pillows ...
Madras spreads-
Wte know you'll lik.e our selection.

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Turkey Shelves Landing

ANKARA ()-Turkey shelved indefinitely yesterday its plan
to ship supplies to the blockaded Turkish Cypriot enclave of Kokkina
under armed escort.
Premier Ismet Inonu's cabinet announced in a communique the
convoy relief move, scheduled for today was postponed at the request
of UN Secretary-General U Thant.
*: '* * ,
UNITED NATIONS (JP)-The United States proposed yesterday
giving the five big powers and large contributors to the United
Nations a bigger voice in determining the financing of future UN
peace-keeping operations.
The effect of the US. plan would be a sort of weighted voting.
It could prevent . the authorization of assessments without the
approval of those who would be expected to foot a major part- of
the bills.
The proposal called for a special General Assembly Finance
Committee that would originate all financial arrangements for peace-
keeping operations. The committee's recommendations would require
approval by a two-thirds majority of the General Assembly
UNIVERSITY, Miss. (A')-The University of Mississippi announced
two Negroes enrolled yesterday for the fall semester in quiet contrast
to rioting which accompanied de-.

r£

JOHN B. L EFi
Phone NO 8-6779 . 601 East I

i

" Of Its Role in Today's World
Evangelos Coufoudakis
Tuesday, Sept. 15
Multi-Purpose Room, 7:30, UGLI
" Of Its Cultural Character-
Mrs. John Pearl
Wednesday, Sept. 1 6
Multi-Purpose Room, 7:30, UGLI
" Of Its Stand on Cyprus
Evangelos Coufoudakis
Dr, Dimitri Pblitis
Michigan nion 3 RS .. . 7:30
Thursday, Sept. 17
" Of Its People 1here. on Campus
International Center
7:00... Friday, Sept. 18
Greek Refreshments
Konstantinos Lardas'
Dance and Poetry

A!LL92AMP JU
DAN CE CLA SSc

AMERICAN BALLROOM 7-8 P.
LATIN AMERICAN . ... 8-9 P.
ADVANCED........ 9-10 P,

BEGINNING:
Wednesday, Sept. 16
Lane Hall Basement
204 S State St.
£PONSORED BY ISA

I ,

p p "
U' Q' 4' ' '
3p pM
4
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WHO_.t.. ME??
TALK WITH WILL HERBERG-ABOUT WHAT I THINK?
YOU'RE KIDDING!!!!!
HE'LL JUST COME LECTURE AND LEAVE-LIKE ALL THE OTHERS .. .
.'WHAT'S THAT YOU SAY?
I CAN BE ON A SELECTED PANEL OF FOUR PERSONS
FOR "AN EVENING OF CONVERSATION WITH WILL HERBERG?"
HOW? WHAT DO I DO? WHEN? WHERE?
1l)Make an appointment for an interview NOW-
call the Office of Religious Affairs, 764-7442.
INTERVIEWS WILL BE HELD FOR THREE DAYS ONLY:
Wed., Sept. 16, 9:30-1 1:30 a.m.; 2:00-5:00 p.m.
Thurs:, Sept. 17, 9:30-12:00 noon; 1:30-5:00 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 18, 9:30-12:00 noon; 1 :00-3:00 p.m.
2) Interviews held in 2282 Student Activities Building;
SELECTION OF PANEL WILL BE MADE BY 5:00 p.m., FRIDAY.
3) INTERVIEWS OPEN TO ALL INTERESTED STUDENTS.
WHO'S WILL HERBERG!!! Dunce! He's only Graduate Professor of
Philosophy and Culture at Drew University, formerly on
the staff of the Washington School of Psychiatry,
well known for his work in social research and theology,
r. 1E a . ne " - a .aa... w . rrL w .. - I. - ... -..i

Theology 301-Studies in Sacred Scrpture
The history and theology of the Old Testament
Time: Thursday at 1-3-7 p.m.

Instructor: Rev. Thomas G. Litka

Theology 401--Christian Marriage ;
A comprehensive study .of marriage from the natural, supernatural, physicial, psychological and sociological aspects.
Time: Monday and Thursday at 9 p.m., beginning November 2. Instructor: Msgr. John F. Bradley
Philosophy 101--Introduction to Scholastic Philosophy
A survey of the formation of Thomistic Philosophy and its relation to contemporary thought.
Time: Monday at 8 p.m. Instructor: Mr. Thomas Schoenbaum
Philosophy 201-Psychological Issues-Aquinas and Freud
How the recent developments in psychology compare with traditional Catholic teaching.
Time: Tuesday at 8 psm. Instructor: Mr. Patrick Lucas
Philosophy 301--Christian Existentialism
Contemporary Philosophical thinking by Christian existentialists.
Time: Tuesday at 8 p.m. Instructor: Mr. Theodore Thonpson
History 101-History of Early Christianity
Traces the growth of the infant Church from the time of the Apostles to the 4th Century.
Time: Tuesday at 1-3-7 p.m. Instructor: Mr. Thomas Giles'
History 201-The Development of Christian Art from the 4th to 14th Centuries
The History of the Church will be studied according to the unfolding of doctrine through the medium of ten centuries of Christian
Time: Tuesday at 7 p.m. Instructor: Mr. Bernard Bonario
History 301-The Reformation and Christian Unity
A study of the causes and consequences of the 16th Century Reformation and their relation with contemporary ecumenism
Time: Thursday at 7 p.m. Instructor: Mr. Timothy Gregory

NEWMAN CLASS PROGRAM
(NON-CREDIT COURSES)'
Theology 101-TheFEundamentals of the Catholic Faith
This course will treat the basic doctrines of the Christian Faith. It is open to everyone, Catholic and non-Catholic alike.
Time: Monday and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2-4-8 p.m. Instructor: Msgr. John F. Bradley
Theology 201-The Foundations of Christian Theology
Presents the preambles of Christian Belief. The nature and existence of God. The spiritual nature of man. The meaning and possibility
of Relvelation and Miracles. The life of Christ. The Foundation of the Church.
Time: Tuesday at 2-4-8 p.m.YInstructor: Rev. Thomas G. Litka

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