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September 15, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMIC.HIGANDAILY

Teller Proposes Peaceful

Bubble Chamber Probes

Uses of Nuclear Blasts

(Continued from Page 1)
The bubble chamber has become,
in just a few years, one of the
most fruitful sources of informa-
Linn nn cto~ mc .nrticl s_

(Continued from Page 1)

. .. I!

1i
1

Since each sandwich brought
to the moon is worth its weight

t'
ti

'The 'big hole,' perhaps the most
obvious creation of the nuclear
explosion, may not be particularlyt
useful by itself," Teller noted. "Butc
if you put many big holes to-
gether, you can make a canal."
A sea level canal across the
Central American Isthmus, which.
could be built in five places, would
relieve overcrowding in the Pan-1
ama Canal and permit large ships
which cannot use the present
canal to get across, he said.-
Minus Value
Nuclear explosions could be.
used in mining to open up hidden:
deposits of natural resources, Tel-I
ler continued. "If it is true that
lack of raw materials is one of3
the main causes of war, then us-
ing nuclear weapons this way
might be the cause of peace."
A special application of the nuc-,
lear explosion, Teller claimed,
would be a project to desalinate I
sea water. It would involve drilling
a two mile hole in the ocean at-
a place where the water is hot
enough when combined with the
pressure produced by the water
column to vaporize.
A nuclear explosion would break,
up the rock, permitting water to
enter the pipe. The question Tel-
ler posed is whether or not the
explosion would also break the
pipe. Fresh water valor would
enter °a second pipe through which
it would be pumped to the sur-
face, he added.
.Fast Neutrons
Technical uses of small nuclear
explosions would, be to produce
fast neutrons, unlike accelerators
which produce slow neutrons, so-
their properties could be studied.
New elements created by a small
nuclear explosion could be collect-
ed more easily than if the explo-
sion were large, Teller explained..
The uses of nuclear explosions
in outer space include propelling
space ships, creating a spacer plat-
form in a special way and supply-
ing future moon colonies with
water.
Emphasizing that these appli-
cations were not necessarily to be
' taken seriously, Teller described
how an asteroid could be captured,
hollowed out with a series of
small nuclear explosions, and
brought back to a place near the
earth so an observatory could be
established on it.
Future moon - dwellers might
benefit from a method of releas-
t ing water from the ground, he
1 noted. Explosions underground re-'
lease water vapor which could
supply men on the moon with'
their own water supply.i
-_ _ _ _ . _ . _ _ _ _ - -._ . _ .

i

in gold, the water could be used I I MJ1L sJVuJ~a~..J9Lz: .l
to growemoon clonists' food sup- Man's Window
Sometimes called "man's win-
ply--algae, thus. saving a great ",, tne cled"a' i
deal of money, Teller said. dow to the interior of the atom,"
Teller refhted the objection tkat it enables physicists to obtain
nuclear explosions are too ex- much more information than was
pensive to make their use prac- previously available on the mans
tical by pointing out that hydro- particles now known to, make up
gren bomb explosions use inex- the atom.
pensive materials and that the Atoms are the smallest par-
size of the job which the nuclear tides of matter which can still
explosion can perform makes ther be classified as elements. They
use relatively inexpensive. are now known to contain many
As for the objection that a more types of particles than sim-
nuclear explosion produces dan- ply neutrons, protons and elec-
gerous radiocativity, Teller re- trons.
plied that hydrogen bomb explo- The huge new bubble chamber
sions can be made so clean that will make available more detailed
people can go safely into the area information about these other
ten minutes after the explosion. particles wbzen it is combined with.
"The time will come when we the Argonne Laboratory's huge
can use these explosions and not new accelerator, called an atom
even Linus Pauling will object," smasher.
Teller said, but later declined to Delivered Soon
explain exactly how they can be The entire bubble chamber ap-
made clean. He said the inforina- paratus will be delivered to the
tion is classified. Argonne Lab about Oct. 1. It is
7_wct_..+ 1-.--- ., ..- 1 h' n L4.j.

i

i45 feet long and 16 feet hign.
Professors Byron P. Roe, Daniel
Sinclair and John Vander Velde
of the physics department have
been in charge of the project.
The Argonne Lab's huge accel-
grator will be the first component
in the process. With it, protons
(normally found in the nuclei of
atoms) are accelerated to almosi
the speed of light, or just under
186,000 miles per second. At thisa
#speed the tiny proton possesses s
fantastic ainount of energy.
This proton is then aimed at a
target which is a small amount M
of matter at an outlet section of
the accelerator. The proton strike:
atoms within this target with suf-
ficient force to literally smash
them to bits. It is these com-
ponent bits that scientists are in-
terestedl in learning about. Using
magnets and separators, the par-
ticular subatomic particle desired
can be separated from the other ,
particles produced and sent intc ;
the bubble chamber.
Pressure Drops
As the particles enter the bubble
chamber from the accelerator's
smashed target, the pressure is,
dropped automatically by ovei
half while the temperature is held
the same. The liquid in the cham-
ber thus becomes "superheated."
It is at a normal gas temperature
and pressure, so that the slightest
disturbance, such as the enter-
ing particles, causes a reaction in.
which bubbles of gas are formed
As each particle moves across the
chambel, it leaves a trail of bub-
bles.
__-__r'_ r . I

THE WORLD'S FIRST bubble chamber wasbuilt
sity 10 years ago by Prof. Donald A. Glaser, now al
of California, Berkeley. He is shown here with o
chambers on the'table. It is considerably smaller
16 foot giant being built now by the University f(
tional Laboratories.

Arg

Often the particles collide wit; p
each other, leaving an invaluablE i
photographed record of the re-}
action, traced out in bubble tracks'
When the bubbles reach a size i
of 1/50th of an inch, flashtube: n
around the chamber's walls go of c
and a picture is taken. The pres- p
sure is quickly increased, the bub- l
bles disappear, the film is ad- s
vanced, and the cycle begins t
again. t
50,000 Needed a
When the new chamber is t
operational, it will be able to take a
one picture every two seconds. Ir 1
some, experiments 50,000 picturer c
are needed to get perhaps half a t
dozen that show the particular e

henomenon
ing for.
Surroundin
er is one o1
ng useful d
et. Particles
hamber and

the scientist is

cal

APA STAR

Ronald Bishop will jOin the As-
sociation of Producing Artists
for the Professional Theatre.
Program's Fall Festival. He has
appeared in the New York pro-
duction of "Othello" with Jose
Ferrer and Paul Robeson as well
as with the Lunts in "The Visit."
Bishop will be seen in "War and
Peace" the opening production
of the APA on Sept. 23. Accord-
ing to Prof. Robert C. Schnitzer,
executive director of the PTP,
a record high has been set for
the number of subscriptions for
the Fall Festival this year.

ann
NN
ARBO
« afPRESENTS ITS
1964-65 PLAYBILL

1

i" _ "' E' ; kid. rcx-

THE BEST MAN

Oct. 15-17

ATTENTION: STUDENT EMPLOYEES and all students

Gore Vidal's timely drana
GYPSY Dec. 9-12
A "Naughty but Nice" mnusical fable

either employed

by the University, by off-campus

v

business establishments-or presently Unemployed.

l

I

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCI. Ad Hoc Commit-
. tee on Student Employees' Association is holding a
special assembly FOR YOU to express your opinions
and ideas concerning the proposed establishment of
a University of Michigan Student Employees' Asso-
ciation.
EVERYONE IS URGED TO ATTEND THIS
IMPORTANT MEETING:
h i

NIGHT OF THE IGUANA
T ennessee Williams' classic
CANDIDA

Mar.

1

Feb. 4-

G. B. Shaw's dan using warient on
the theme of the Eternal Triangle
SHOT IN THE DARK Apr. 22-2
Mystery and Mirth
SEASON TICKET PRICES
Thursday $6.00; Friday & Saturday $7.00
Special small theatre party group rate:
6 season tickets for the price of 5

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
7:30 P.M.
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM-UGLI
For further information contact:
Barry Bluestone
Student Government Council
665-2279 or
663-0553

Name

Address:

X ,. .. .

Phone: _ _ _Date:
Reserve Season Tickets as follows:
Thursday $6 Q, Friday $7 E, Saturday $7 Q
Prefer Wednesday Night for Musical only: Q

4 .. a v

Seatinig Preference

If you wish tickets mailed to you, send self-addressed
stamped envelope with your ticket order to:
. ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
P.O. Box 1993, Ann Arbor

U

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U- PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM ttRETURN OF THE WIDELY ACCLAIMED APA

American Premiere1
JUDITH
by Jean Giraudoux

THE HOSTAGE
l . rendan Beha

_m

'1 (iI

IIXIH

I

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