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September 12, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Baf fled?
In case you're baffled by the
barrage of education bills which
Congress has considered or
passed recently, here is a quick
rundown of some of the impor-
tant measures for the Univer-
sity:
-A $7.1 billion appropria-
tion bill for the Departments
of Labor and Health, Education
and Welfare would provide
$700,000 for the National De-'
fense Education Act loans here,
X135 million for all institutions.
In addition it would supply.
more than $200,000 in loans to
University students in the medi-
cal. dental and nursing schools.
The HEW measure will make
funds available which the Uni-
versity builders hope to tap for
partial construe'ion of a grad-
uate library addition. It will
also give a special state agency
in Michigan $10 million where
the University may also solicit
funds..
Status: Passed by Congress,
awaits President Lyndon B.
Johnson's signature.
--An -NDEA amendment bill.
would expand and extend the.
NDEA loan program and per-
haps make more ,funds avail-
able to students here this year.
The measure would increase
the $135 available in the HEW
appropriation to $163 million
for this school year.
Status: Different versions
passed by both houses. Awaits
conference action.
-An economic opportunity
act program costing $72.5 mil-
lion would stimulate and pro-
mote the part-time employment
of s udents in higher education
institutions. Under this pro-
gram, students would receive
federal financial aid in return
'r ' community services which
w"uld otherwise not be render-
ed.
Status: The prpgram is out-
ined in the Economic Oppor-
tunity Act pissed in August, but.
awai s a Congressional appro-
Priation. to implement it.

NEW PLAYERS:
APA Adds Four To Repertory C
By GAIL BLUMBERGf.
Four prominent Broadway play- n
ers have joined the ranks of the
Association of Producing Artists,
resident repertory company of the!;
Universiay Professional Theatre i
Program. They are Donald Moffat,$-..
Ronald Bishop, Morris Erby and
Paddy Croft.
Moffat is a character actor
whose distinguished career has in-
cluded leading roles in the New
York revival of Shaw's "Misal-
liance," "Macbeth" at the Edin-'
burgh Festival, John Gielgud's I-':".y -
"Much Ado About Nothing" with
Margaret Leighton, and with the.
Old Vic. He will be seen in a
leading role in "War and Peace," .
the opening production of the
APA on Sept. 23.

ii

Erby has come to! the APA from
a leading roll in the long-ru ,
(Off-Broadway play, " The Blacks.'
Previously he played major Holly-
wood roles in "Raisin in the Sun,"
"The Rainmaker," "Deep are the
Roots," and "The Connection."
Last summer, Erby toured with
Sammy Davis Jr. in "The Des-
perate Hours." He has appeared
in lead roles on every. major TV
network including ten appearances
as "Sargeant Davis" on "Peter
Gunn."
Miss Croft created the role
which she will play in "The Hos-
tage" in the original production
under the direction of" Stephen
Porter. She has been a member
of the Birmingham Repertory
Company, toured England with
the leading role in "Victoria Re-
gina" for the British Arts Coun-
cil, and played lead roles at the.
Coventry Festival. In addition,
Miss Croft has appeared on Cana-
dian TV and starred in such
works as "Pygmalion" with the
Canadian Players.

,;}

MORRIS ERBY
Returning with the APA arel
the artistic director Ellis Rabb.
and phis wife Rosemary Harris,
star of the British National
Theatre, who will have the lead1
role in "War and Peace." Also
with the company again are Nancy
Marchand, Paul Sparer, Joanna
Roos, Sydney Walker, Richard
Wood, Clayton Corzatte, Keene
Curtis, Gordon Gould and Joseph
Bird.

PADDY CROFT

r

U. of M. UNION
wishes to a nnounce
the app earance o f

Teller To Talk Cmd George Lincoln

Bishop, not pictured, was the
| actor-director-designer for ten
years 't the Hedgerow Theatre
in Philadelphia. He appeared in;
the New York production of
"Othello" with Jose Ferrer and
Paul Robeson as well as with the
Lunts in "The Visit." He has ap-
peared on Canadian TV and in
Off-Broadway roles with' the
Shakespearewrights, a classical
repertory company. Bishop will be
seen in "War and Peace.",

On Atom Plans
P.rof. Edward Teller, known for
the role he played in the develop-
nent of the atomic and hydrogen
bombs, will speak on "Project
Plowshare on Earth and in.Space,"
at 730 p.m. Sun. Sept. 13 'in
Rackham Aud.
His talk will deal with how nu-
clear explosives may be put to
peaceful work in the construction
of such projects as a second
Panama Canal.
Teller is now director of the
Lawrence Radiation Laboratory of
the University of California.
YThe lecture will be "sponsored, by
the Michigan section of the Amer-
ican Nuclear Society and the So-
ciety's student branch.

on Campus ifl

~ ~~

L
U

October

ARBO
PRESENTS ITS
1964-65 PLAYB

i

"Vietnamese students - without'
adjectives such as Catholic or
Buddhist."
For the moment,, Dao Duy has
become a salesman far his .idea.
"We are tryingto awakenour
students to social reality," he de-
clared.
"When we set up this program,
we may have difficulty with the
Communists. They know they will
lose forever once our people know
what freedom and democracy is."
Dao Duy expects the Commun-
ists to employ terrorism against
the student workers. "Many of us
may be killed, but I think our
death will. have' some meaning td
the :peasants. They will wonder:,
"This student came to us and;
gave us an opportunity to lift our-
selves up. Why did they come and'
kill him?'"

THE BEST MAN

Oct

Gore Vidal's timely drama

GUILD HOUSE.

802 Monroe

GYPSY

Dec. 9-12

Mlonday'Noon Seminar & Discussion,
Buffet Lunch 25c

A "Naugbty but Nice' musical fable
NIGJIT OF THE IGUANA Feb. 4- 6
Tennessee Williams' classic

, ~ 1

CANDIDA

Mar. 4- b

gonday, Sept. 14-

G. B. Shaw's amusing varient on
the theme of the Eternal Triangle

. :. 3,... ; j...

"THE CONSERVATIVE
POLITICAL POSITION"
PROFESSOR JOHN A. CLARK
Prof. of English, V.P. Anri Arbor Conservatives;

-Ending Today@-
THE BEATLES in
"A Hard Day's Night"
Shown at 1-3-5-7 & 9 p.m.
SUNDAY

SHOT IN THE-DARK Apr. 22-24
Mystery and Mirth
SEASON TICKET PRICES
'I Thursday $6.00; Friday & Saturday $7.00
Special small theatre party group rate:
';; 6 season tickets for the Price of 5
Name
I'j A ddress: '
Phone: or __Date:

Next Monday, Sept. 21-
"THE TWO WORDS"
PROFESSOR ANATOLE RAPPORT
Prof. of Mathematical Biology

4

I Reserve Season Tickets as follows:

Thursday $6 L,
Prefer WednesdayI

EVERY SUNDAY EVENING 7-8 P.M.

Friday $7 Q1 oSturday $7
Night for Musical only: Q

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Seatinig Preference:

A PtUM" QANE

Seminar & Discussion
"The History of Christian Thought"
Led by Reverend J. Edgar Edwards, Campus Minister

If you wish tickets mailed to you, send, self-addressed
stamped envelope with your ticket orderto
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
P.O. Box 1993, Ann Arbor

I

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'U

FRATERNITIES AT MICHIGAN
PRESENT

f.

.I

MAN ~rATINEES SEPT". 23-24 NIGHTS
1 :30 p.m-$ 1.50 O tNLY 8 p.m.-$2..50
r ~Russiarn Classic Film Tonight
U* U
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II lUl iEU1! 1,

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