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August 28, 1964 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

M4 FRIDAY, AUQVST 28, 1961
r.om.:

IT MICHIGAN DAILY

7

Draft on Student-Faculty Freedom]

-

'KYY YY CYV S -

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7 tion. The administration should
not discriminate against astudent
because of membership in any
such organization.
A student organization should be
free to choose its own faculty ad-
viser. No organization should be,
forbidden when, after reasonable
effort, it has failed to obtain a
faculty adviser. An adviser should
consult with and advise the or-
ganization but should have no au-
thority or responsibility to regu-
late or control its activities.
FREEDOM OF STUDENT PUB-
L LICATION. An academic comu-
nit" requires freedom to exchange
infrmtion and ideas. The.fa-
ulty should promote and sustain
institutional policies which will
provide students the freedom to
establish their on publications
nd to cbnduct them free of en-
'soshp"or of faculty or -admin-
istrativeddetermination of con-
oE itors and mangersof stu-
dent publications should be select-
ed democratically, on the basis of
competence, and in accordance
with established procedures.
'2) Editors and -managers should
have independence of action dur-
ing their .term of office. They
should be protected against sus-
pension and removal because of
" facuty, administrative, or public
p dstpprvalofediorial plcy o
cfeioil oiontent. Similarly, neither stu-
dent control of the publication nor
"" the powers of the student govern-
ing body should be used to limit
editorial freedom. On the other
hand, a student publication should
open its pages to representation of
diverse points of view.
3) Freedom to distribute pub-
lications on or off campus should
be permitted.
4) Students should also be free
to establish, publish, and distribute
unsubsidized publications without
institutional niterference.
5) Student directors of campus
television and radio stations,.not
perated primarily .for instruc-
tinal purpose, should have a
freedom of programming, subject
to F.C.C. regulations, comparable
to that, of the editorial staff of
campus publications. -
III
Responsibility of Faculty
for Safeguarding Off-
Campus Freedom of
Students
The faculty has an obligation
to insure that institutional au-
thority and discplinaryy powers
are not employed to circumvent
or limit the rights of students as
,members of the larger community.
CITIZEN FREEDOMS. Students
should enjoy the same freedom of
religion, speech, press and assem-
bly, and the right to petition the
authorities, that citizens general-
ly possess. Exercise of these rights
Subject them to institutional pen-
on or 'Off the campus. should not
, altoes.
POLITICAL RIGHTS. Off-cam-
pus activities of students may
upon occasion result in vioation
of law. Students who viola or-
dinances or laws they consider

to be morally wrong risk legal
penalties prescribed by civil au-
thorities. However, not every con-
viction under the law represents
an offense with which an educa-
tional institution must concern it-
self. The student who violates
institutional regulations, such as
those relating to class attend-
ance, in the course of his pro-
test should be subjected to no
greater penalty than would nor-
mally be imposed if the violation,
had not arisen in the course of
a public controversy. When stu-
dents ran into police difficulties
off the campus in connection with
what they regard as their politi-
cal rights-as, for example, tak-
ing part in sit-ins, picket lines,
demonstrations, riding on freedom
buses -- the college authorities
should .take every practical step
to assure themselves that such
students are protected in their
full legal rights and against abuse.
IV
Responsibility of Faculty
for Procedural Due
Process in Cases of
Alleged Misconduct
The faculty has an obligation
to see that students are not dis-
ciplined for allegedn iscondut
without 'adequate procedural safe-
guards. The folowing procedures
are recommended to assure rea
sonable protectfon of the student,
a fair determination of the facts,
and the application of appropri-
ate sanctions.
NOTICE OF CONDUCT SUB-
JECT TO DISCIPLINE. Discipli-
nary proceedings should be in-
stituted only for alleged viola-
tions of adequately defined stand-
ards of conduct made known to
the students in advance, e.g.,
through publication in the cata-
logue or student handbook. Of-
fenses and penalties should be
made as clear as possible, avoid-
ing such vague phrases as "un-
desirable conduct" or 'conduct in-
ju ious to the r'est interests of the
institution."
CONDUCT OF INVESTIGA-
TION PRELIMINARY TO FOR-
MAL CHARGES. Except under
emergency circumstances, premis-
es occupied by students and thej
personal possessions of students
should not be searchea unless ap-

propriate authorization has been
obtained. For premises such as
dormitories controlled by the in-
stitution, an apropriate academic
authority should be designated to
whom application must be made.
before a search can be conducted.
The application should specify the
reasons for the search and the'
objects or information sought. The
studentt should be present, if pos-
sible, during the search. For prem-
ises not controlled by the insti-
tution, the ordinary requirements
for lawful search should be fol-
lowed.
Students detected or arrested in
the course of serious violations of
institutional regulation, cr infrac-
tions of ordinary law, should be
informed of their applicable rights
under institutional regulations
and general law. No form of har-
assment, including isolation from
counsel, should be used by insti-
tutional representatives to coerce
admissions of guilt or information
about conduct of other suspected
persons.
NOTICE OF CHARGES. The
student should be informed, in
writing, of the reasons for the
proposed disciplinary action with
sufficient particularity, and in suf-
ficient time, to ensure opportunity
for a proper defense.
TREATMENTn OF STUDENT
PENDING FINAL ACTION. Pend-
ing action on the charges, the stat-
us of a student should not be
altered or his right to be "present 1
on the campus and to attend
classes suspended except for rea-
sons relating to his physical or
emotional safety and well-being,
or for reasons relating to the
safety of, students, faculty, and
university property.
HEARING. The formality of the
procedure to which a student is
entitled should be proportioned to
the sanctions which may be impos-
ed. Informal tribunals, such as
traffic bureaus 'or dormitory or
residential councils, may assess
minor penalties and some cases
may be closed 'with a reprimand.
But if, after investigation, it ap-
pears that the alleged offense may;
expose the student to serious sanc-
tions, for instance expulsion, sus-
pension, substantial fine, or nota-
tion on a permanent record, he
should have the right to appeal
the initial judgment of his culp-
ability to a Hearing Board. The

Board should be composed of fac-
ulty members selected by the fac-
ulty or, subject to request by the
accused student, of faculty mem-
bers and students, the latter to
be selected by the student council
or another appropriate agency of
student government.
1) The Hearing Board proceed-
ing shouic be de novo, that is,
without reference to 'ny matter
previously developed in informal
proceedings. No member Of the
Hearing Board who is otherwise
interested in the particular case
should sit in judgment during that
proceeding.
2)h The student appearing before
the Hearing, Board. should Dave.
the right to be accompanied and
represented by an adviser of his
choice, and by legal counsel if he
so requests.
3) The burden of proof should
rest upon the officials Instigat-
ing or responsible for establish-
ing the (charge.
4) The student should be given
an opportunity to testify and to
present evidence and witnesses
relevant to the charge or the pen-
alties involved. Wheneverpossi-
ble,, he should be given an op-
portunity to cross-examine adverse
witnesses. In no case should the
Board consider statements against
him unless he has beenhadvised
of their content and of the names
of those who made them, and un-
less he has been given an oppor-
tunity to rebut unfavorable in-
ferences which might otherwise be
drawn.
5) The decision should be bas-
ed solely upon matters placed in
evidence during the hearing. The
failure of the accused student to
testify (if such is the case) should
not be a factor in the decision
and improperly acquired evidence
should not be admitted.
6) A transcript of the hearing
should be made and, subject to
the student's waiver, the proceed-
Ang before the Hearing Board
should be open.
FURTHER RECOURSE. Subject
only to the student's right to ap-
peal t4 the highest institutional
authority or a designee, or to a
court as provided by law, the de-
cision of the Hearing Board should
be final.
Submitted by Phillip Mony.
penny (Political Science, Univer-
sity of Illinois), chairman of Com-
mittee S.

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'i' ,

International Presentations for 1964-1965

CHORAL UNION SERIES

Chicago Symphony Orchestra . . . . . . . . Friday, September 25
Antonio and the Ballets de Madrid Thursday, ,October 8
Warsaw Philharmonic . . . . . . . . . . . Wednesday, October 14
LeonidKogan,violinist. . . . . . . . Wednesday, November 4
Raduga Dancers . . . . . . . . . . . . Saturday, November 14
"Faust" (Gounod) New York City Opera . . Sunday, November 22
Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra . . . . . . Monday, February 8
Rosalyn Tureck Pianist . . . . . . . Monday, March I
Robert Merrill, Baritone . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friday, March 12
National Ballet of Canada .. .......Saturday, April 3

Season

Tickets:

$25.00--$20.00.-$17.00--$14.00--$12.00

EXTRA SERIES

London Symphony Orchestra . . . . . . . . . Friday, October
Iria Arkhipova, Mezzo-soprano . . . . . . Monday, November
"Merry Widow (Lehar) New York City Opera (2:30) Sunday, Nov. 2
Berlin Philharmonic. . .. . . Saturday, January 3
Polish M ime Theatre......... .. Tuesday, February 2

*Season Tickets:

$12.50-=$10.00--$8.50--$7.00--$6.00

#fifffi * * a

CHAMBER 'ARTiS SERIES

Soc ieta

Corelli . 5. . .

0

New York Chamber Soloists

. .

. .Wednesday, October 28
Tuesday, November 17
. . . . . Wednesday, January 20

Andres Segovia,

Guitarist

Paris Chamber Orchestra .
Netherlands Chamber Choir .
Chicago Little Symphony . .
Solisti iZagreb.

Sunday, February 1.

;

is f' s 4 s

Saturday,, February 27

.. . . Sunday,

March

7

Tuesday, Mac

. . r s . . . . .4

*Season Tickets:

$15.00--$12.00-$10.00

4-
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*NOW ON SALE. (Counter sale for single performances tegin Sept. 10)

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SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS

Ballets de Paris, featuring Zizi Jeanmaire . . . . . . . . Tupsday, September
"Die Fledermaus" (New York City Opera Co.) . . . . . . . Friday, November

i

Tickets: $4:50-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.25-$1.50
"Messiah" (Handel) 2 performances . . . . . . . Saturday,
(Tickets on sle beginning October 1 2:30, Sunday,

December
December

5
6

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I

FESTIVALS

3/f et1&L6i

Chamber Dance Festival
Paul Taylor Dance Company{
Jean Leon Destine Dancers
First Chamber Dance Quartet
Series Tickets: $6.00-$5.00-$4.00
Single Performances: $3.50-$2.50-$2.00

. . . Friday, ,October

. . . . .

23
24

. . . . . . . Saturday, October

iIuaitonal men j

Wear

. (2:30) Sunday, October 25

The acknowledged leader
of Michigan Men
for forty years
Qii2I12R) J9.

Chamber Music Festival (five Beethoven concerts)

Budapest String Quartet
Tickets on sale November 5.

February 17, 18, 19, 20, 21

. . . . . .

Ann Arbor May Festival, 1965 (six concerts)

The Philadelphia Orchestra . . . . . .f . . . . . May 6, 7, 8, 9
Eugene Ormandy, Music Director, guest conductor and soloists
Orders for series tickets accepted and filed beginning Decemrber 1.

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