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April 02, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-02

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FRIDAY, 2 APRIL 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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FRIAY,2 PRI4165LHE\ICL!4 T 1 L ZI

PAUE SEVEN

Y:

slwphas IS by TOM WEINBERG
M-pha is b TOM Sports Editor3
MSU Athletics:
Wrong Approach
The line of least resistance for anyone in Ann Arbor is to
criticize anything that happens in East Lansing. But today, there
is more justification than usual for finding the athletic situation
at Michigan State distasteful.
The firing of basketball coach Forddy Anderson yesterday by
MSU athletic director Biggie Munn is an incident which I can't
help from protesting and degrading. The statements made by
Anderson and by Munn shed some light on the improper place that
athletics seem to have carved out for itself at Michigan State.
Michigan State has long been accused in these parts for improper
emphasis on athletics, and Munn's statement to the press that the
basketball fortunes of MSU have been fading and that a new coach
would perhaps brighten up the picture is particularly objectionable.
Anderson's public apology for not producing teams that live up
to the standards that Mr. Munn considers adequate is almost
unmistakably an indication of the rift that has been speculated
between Munn and all the coaches at State.
But regardless of the reasons, and going beyond the fact
that any basketball coach treads on thin ice, the guiding prin-
ciples of MSU's athletic program are at issue here. It would
be completely naive to say that a college coach has no pressure
on him to have a winning team, but it's a sad commentary on
sports at State when the athletic director openly applies the
criteria of major league baseball executives in dealing with his
personnel.
Anderson has a good repuitation as a coach, despite this year's
dismal 1-13 mark. His teams won two championships, and it's wrong
if the sole reason for dismissing him was his record. But even if more
is involved, Munn used poor judgment for emphasizing this factor.
Over the years, State has been deservedly under fire for
running athletics with its eyes closed to many of the rules of
the game. Trouble with the Big Ten, the NCAA, and other schools
for their recruiting practices, aid program, academic neglect,
and conniving business tactics in athletics has had a long
history at State. Firing Anderson simply for failing to win, or
at least using this as the rationale, is just one more example
of the poor perspective on which MSU as an institution conducts
its athletic program.
There's no doubt that this would never happen here. Unquestion-
ably, Michigan coaches are under pressure to win. Unquestionably,
they should be to some extent. But if that's the sole measurement
of the coach's contribution to the University and the athletic
program, sports should probably be eliminated. Obviously, I deplore
this possibility and am proud and relieved it couldn't happen here.

Detroit, Montreal

Win Stanley Cup Openers

DETROIT (A)-Veteran center
Norm Ullman scored with less
than five minutes remaining last
night and the Detroit Red Wings
defeated the Chicago Black Hawks
4-3 in the opening game of their
best-of-seven Stanley Cup semi-
final series.
Ullman's goal off Chicago net-
minder Glenn Hall overshadowed
a great comeback by the Hawks'
injured wingman Bobby Hull.
Hull, a doubtful starter until
just before game time, collected

one Black Hawk goal and was
credited with two key assists.
Scoring honors, however, went
to veteran Red Wing Captain Alex
Delvecchio. Delvecchio, with as-
sists by Gordie Howe and Ullman,
scored at 12:13 in the final per-
iod to tie the game before Ull-
man's winning blast.
Hip Shot
Delvecchio's first goal came at
11:54 in the second period on a
solo shot that bounced off Hall's
hip.

A crowd of 14.297 saw both ronto Maple Leafs last night in
teams wait each other out for the their opening game of the Stan-
first 12 minutes. Wingman Floyd ley Cup playoffs.
Smith broke the scoring ice at T
12:51 when he rebounded a shot The second game in the best-of-
past Hall. seven series will be played here
Hull, who has suffered with a tomorrow night.
knee injury since late February, Rousseau's goal offset a spirit-
put Chicago back in the game at ed Toronto rally that saw the
16:45 of the first period when he Leafs tie the score at 2-2 with
slammed a shot past Red Wing third period goals by Dickie Moore
goalie Roger Crozier. Crozier had at 8:04 and Carl Brewer at 10:46.
no chance on the shot. Montreal had taken a 2-0 lead
Center Phil Esposito gave Chi- in the first period on goals by
cago a 2-1 lead early in the sec- Henri Richard and Ralph Back-
ond period on a sharp pass from strom.
Hull. Esposito's low shot skidded
past Crozier.

Rousseau's winning goal in the three occasions, once with two
hard-fought game came on a men in the penalty box. Each time
spectacular power play. the Leafs failed to get a serious

I

Montreal's first goal came at!
11:02 of the first period when
Richard fired a low 20-footer
through a maze of players and
goalie Johnny Bower's legs into
the net.
A few minutes later, at 14:34,
Montreal went ahead 2-0 when
Backstrom snared the puck from
a faceoff, skated right in and beat
Bower on a short shot.
Toronto missed opportunities in
the first seven minutes when the
Canadiens were short-handed on

f

shot on Charlie Hodge in the
Montreal net.
After a high sticking penalty
was called on Backstrom at 9:10
of the second period players from
both teams swarmed onto the ice,
but few punches were thrown.

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
CHUCK VETZNER

Trackmen Travel South
For Outdoor warm-Up

By STEVE GALL them practice running outside,"
he added. The cindermen, who
On Saturday the Wolverine cn- fly down this morning on a char-
dermen will escape the snow and tered plane are limiting their'
sleet of Ann Arbor by journey- traveling squad to only 24 men.
ing down to sunny South Carolina Michigan will be competing in
for their first outdoor test of the the meet for the first time. The
season. events include five relays, with a
The tracksters, who have been limited number of individual run-
stymied by the weather here, will ning events--only the 100-yard
at least get a chance to run out- dash, 120 high hurdles, 330-yard
side as they are participating in hurdles, and the two-mile run.
the annual South CarolinaRelays. The regular array of field events
Some strong eastern schools such will also be on the agenda.
as Maryland, Clemson and South It should be interesting to see
Carolina promise to give Michigan how pole-vaulter George Cana-
strong competition. mare adjusts to the outside. Cana-
However, the purpose of the mare who hasset the varsity rec-
team's jaunt to far off Carolina ord with a leap of 15'4%" says
land is just to get the runners he prefers vaulting indoors.
used to the sunshine. Assistant Wolverine captain Kent Bernard,
track coach Dave Martin said yes- who injured himself running on
terday that there would be no the boards at the NCAA Indoor,
additional strain on his runners. Meet in,~Detroit, is back to nor-
Only One Event mal and raring to go outdoors.
"We plan to use our boys only Bernard will probably see action
in one event each, just to give in the mile relay.
=- - -

Not To Last
Prior to Detroit's two last per-
iod goals, Chicago took a brief,
3-2 lead on a pass from Hull to
Chico Maki. Maki beat Crozier
from 20 feet out.
Both teams tried repeated pow-
er plays in the final period but
were unable to break through
strong defensive play and goal
minding.
At one point Detroit had only
three men in front of Crozier.
However, veteran Marcel Prono-
vost, Bill Gadsby and Howe broke
up repeated Black Hawk passes
and Crozier proved superb in the
nets. The Wings were down two
men with penalties at the time.
K

I , * *::' ., '--'.",.,,..' ...,.*-.--'

MONTREAL (P)-Bobby Rous-
seau's goal at 12:29 of the third
period gave the Montreal Cana-
diens a 3-2 victory over the To-l

BOBBY HULL

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