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April 02, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-02

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, 2 APRIL 1965

ARTS and LETTERS By Kay Holmes
Quintet Marks Jazz Revivalj

Campus Bookstores Gross Millions

Yearly

Although teenagers are prone to
say "don't give me that jazz,"
this weekend Ann Arbor will have
quite a bit of jazz happening.
The quality of the jazz is aptly
illustrated by the scheduled ap-
pearance of the George Bohanon-
Ronnie Fields Quintet Sunday.
In the liner notes of "Passin'
Thru," George Bohanon's last re-
cording with the Chico Hamilton
Quintet, Dan Morgenstern intro-
duces him with the following:
"George Bohanon hails from De-
troit, thereby proing that the
jazz fountain in 'Big D' has by no
means as yet run day." It is this
life-spring to the Detroit jazz
fountain that "Jazz Scene '65" will
bring to town.
Jazz Revival
Although in the early sixties the
Detroit jazz fountain was almost
nonexistent, through a series of
fortunate circumstances the Quin-
tet came into being. These cir-
DIAL 5-6290
HELD OVER 4th WEEK
(thru Tues., April 6th)
CONTINUOUS POPULAR
PERFORMANCESI I PRICES
STANEY KRAMER "T'S A
MAD,
ULTRA MAU, MAD
PANAVISIO A MAD
TECHNICOLOM
NIN ARTIST WORLD"
Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees $1.25
Eves. & Sun. $1.50
Shows at
1:00-3:40- 6:25- 910
\\
DIAL 8-6416
"A WILD AND
WONDERFUL
TIME !"
-Time Magazine
"WILD AS A RUNAWAY
TRAIN! A LULU! FUN
FOR FUN'S SAKE!"
--New York Times
li
*^
F1'
'lIEI
S'
JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO
FRANCOISE DORLEAC
JEAN SERVAIS
Filmed in EASTMANCOLOR
DIAL 662-6264
SHOWS START AT
1:00-3:35-6:15 & 9:00

A O a

cumstances were brought about by
the people who came out to listen
even though at times the music
was often far from exciting; those
who kept featuring jazz in their
clubs although the cash registers
were often far from full, and
those DJ's and critics, like Down
Beat correspondent John Sinclair,
who kept saying and writing that.
things were getting better in De-
troit, even when things looked
bleak.
From this sad state of jazz
affairs emerged the Quintet. Ron-
nie Fields, who had been playing
with George Bohanon at Odom's
Cave for more than a year, de-
cided to start a new group. He
subsequently succeeded in con-
vincing Bohanon and pianist
Kenny Cox, who had been playing
at Odom's Cave for . several
months, to join him.
The problem of finding a suit-
able rhythm section was solved
when bassist Will Austin and
drummer Bert Myrick agreed to3
complete the quintet.I
A typical set by the Quintet will
contain tunes like McCoy Tyner's
"Three Flowers," Ronnie Fields'
"Paramour," and Kenny Cox's
"The Latin Bit." With the group's
excellent ensemble work, these dif-
ficult tunes seem easy, and the
audience feels the ease and en-
joyment with which they play.
Audience Reception
Their harmony in playing to-
gether is one reason for the
group's rapid rise to the extra-
ordinary local fame they enjoy.

The other main reason is the
tremendous enthusiasm and con-
fidence the five have, and their
ability to convey these feelings
musically to their audience.
Speaking of the audience recep-
tion, Bohanon said, "That's what's
really beautiful, the audience, be-
cause they are people who are a
little hipper than the average au-
dience in the sense that they
know a ,little bit more about what
we are doing and what they are
hearing. The music is playing and
everybody's sitting and digging it,
not making any noise or anything
with big grins on their faces."
Commenting on jazz in general,
Bohanon said that many musi-
cians, when they arrive at a cer-
tain level, are just concerned with
getting work.
"If they don't care about their
music, who does? How is the club
owner. going to care, how is the
audience going to care?" he said.
Financial Success
The audience does care, and
economically, jazz has given club
owners a reason to care, too.
There are already signs that more
jazz employment will be provided
by club owners who are aware
that it can attract a large au-
dience. Club owners Edith Cantor
of the Un-Stabled, Jordan Fish-
man of the Chit-Chat, Tom
Mahon of the Village Gate, and
Irv Helman of the Drome have
demonstrated to others that good
jazz does attract an audience if
it is given good publicity and good
preentation within the club.

(Continued from Page 1) sold elsewhere, as the bookstores even less in the summer. This, close to the University community added service involved in building
State (the findings are purported themselves (except for Follett's, of course, wastes money, and the on a personal level. "Seventy-five a steady trade, and, as stated be-
to apply to commercial merchants which is part of a chain) appar- merchants have tried to alleviate per cent of Ann Arbor bookmen fore, the bookstores offer the serv-
surrounding Harvard and Wayne ently do not shuttle books to other the situation by pressing the stu- are Michigan grads. Mrs. Slater ice of selling the student all his
as well as to the list coop prices campuses. One as yet unpublished dents to buy their books ahead of is (Bump) Elliott's mother-in-law. needs at the same location.
at these institutions), report, however, claims jobbers do time, especially at summer orien- The bookstore owners are helping A
The report does not attribute give considerably higher than 25 tation. Ulrich's has even gone to s o m e students and athletes According to Marshall, the Ain
the difference in prices to either per cent on re-saleable books, of- the point of instituting a desk on through school. They are active Arbor bookstore system offers bet-
Ann Arbor bookmen's changingr ten up to 50 per cent of list price, the sidewalk on which students in the community," Marshall said. ter book service than most campus
their prices or to a publisher's Discontinued books, which have can fill out their order slips out- Tarson th utrschaoly a
"deal" to sell here at higher pricesI been replaced by new editions or side the confines of the store it- The bookmen also provide a comparison to such schools as
both of which seem highly un- better competing texts, draw very self. The only time the stores seem genuine service for their profits. Wayne, where, he claims the coop
likely, little. The fifth edition of "Eco- to operate at a point closely ap- Firstly, because they are in cam- store "is terrible." In addition to
The report is not yet complete nomics," for instance, which sold proximating their capacity is petition, they do many things to texts, it offers "few paperbacks
enough to provide solid ground at $6.75, today lists in one of the around Christmas time. build a steady trade of loyal cus- and great books, and little else."
enoug pid nat o biggs jober's -tomers for themselves. Among the Indeed, Cohen's report states the
for any real conclusions, and the nation's biggest jobber's cats- The merchants also lose addi- added services they offer are buy- Ann Arbor book industry yields
credibility of these findings has logues for only 75cnots. Those tional money on theft and errors ing books they know they can better book service than even
been attacked on many sides. books the bookmen cannot sell ty by their salesclerks in forgetting never sell for a profit either to the Berkeley and Harvard, where
Most of those the business feel the jobbers, they put out, usually to charge for books and charging jobbers or at their odds-and-ends large-scale coops have been quite
that such price differences are toward the endof the semester, the wrong prices, especially in the sales, Cohen said. Ordering hard- well established for a long period
out of the question. That Ann on odds and ends table and sell hectic pre-semester rush. ' Order- to-get texts is also a part of the of time.
Arbor new book prices would be them for often as little as 25-cents. inerror_-smesonteprt h_erook-_t-ee___asar___e__ie
higher than anywhere else is, ac- 'Soft Goods' ng errors on the part of the book-
cording to Marshall, "contrary to The third major item the book- also costly. In addition, publish-
the nature of the entire book stores handle is "soft goods"- s s in shiin, bIh U
ers errors in shipping have to bep
industry." notebooks, pencils, graphrpaper- corrected by the booksellers' own UnversityPlyers
Used BooksI and indeed this is their major saftm n oe rmps
One area in which the Ann profit item. To quote Cohen's re- tage, phone bills and lost sales. Dept. of Speech present
Arbor bookmen seem to differ in port, in the area of soft goods, This, especially during the rush.pc fo.as s h i "Copeh ga
price from other areas is the field "the bookstores charge whatever ason, can be quite costly. e rush

i

Across Campus

Three University faculty mem-
bers were speaking at the fourth
annual Conference on Maternal
and Perinatal Welfare sponsored
by the Michigan State Medical
Society in Flint recently.
Prof. George W. Morley of the
Medical School' planned to pre-
sent a preliminary report on a
15-year study of breech deliveries
at the Medical Center.
Prof. A. James French, chair-
man of the pathology department,
was to discuss "Perinatal Path-
ology Quiz."
Prof. Robert 0. Blood, chair-
man of the sociology department,
was to speak on "Medical Im-
plications of the Population Ex-
plosion."
Prof. Reynolds M. Denning of
the geology and mineralogy de-
partment presented a paper on
"Grinding Hardness and Cleav-
age in Neutron-Irradiated Dia-
mond" at the 20th annual con-
vention of the Industrial Dia-
mond Association of America re-
cently in Hollywood Beach, Fla.
The research Denning describeC
was part of a study made possi-
ble by a research contract with
the U.S. Atomic Energy Commis-
sion.
FRIDAY, APRIL 2
10 a.m.-Canadians and other

Rm. 3B of the Union.
3:45 p.m.-Prof. David T. Shaw
from the Division of Interdisci-
plinary Studies and Research at
the State University of New York
at Buffalo will speak on the "Fun-
damental Approach to Direct En-
ergy Conversion" in Cooley Aud.,
North Campus.
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Vernon Roland
of the Western Reserve Medical
School will speak on "Condition-
ed Cortical Slow-Potentials and
the Concept of Activation" in
7p.m.-Alvin D. Loving, former
dean of students at the University
of Nigeria, will speak on "Africa:
Fact or Fiction?" before a con-
ference sponsored by the African
Students Union at the First Bap-
tist Church. Movies on Africa will
be shown before and after the
speech.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
precent W. C. Fields in "The Bank
Dick," in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.--Michifish will present
"Patterns in Sculpture" as the
annual Michigan water show in
the Women's Pool.
8:30 p.m.--Mrs. Eunice Burns,
Democratic candidate for mayor,
will speak at 803 Edgewood Place.
8:30 p.m.-Prof. Orren C. Mohl-
er, chairman of the astronomy de-
partment, will discuss "Patterns
in the Sky" as part of a series
" '. ' 'i:r.9. ~rho enin~~

I,

persons interested in University 'of Visitor's Nghts" sponsored
teaching and research in Canada by his department in Aud. D. If
may meet Canadian represents- the sky is clear, visitors will ob-
tives from 10 to 12. For appoint- serve star clusters through the
ments call Charles Banciu in the Angell telescopes.
Riankha BlL. SATURDAY, APRIL 3

3 p.m.-Dean William Haber of
the literary college; Prof. ArnoldI
Kaufman of the philosophy de-
partment and Prof. Donald Brown
of the psychology department will
speak on "The Student Role in
Evaluating Individual Faculty" in

7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present Buster Keaton in
"The General" in Architecture
Aud.
8:30 p.m. - The Choral Union
Series will present the National
Ballet of Canada in Hill Aud.

____________ I-I 1

" th e

SEE

for KODAK products
featured on TVC
" informed sales people
" pleasant shopping atmosphere

I

I

Wed., March 31 through Sat., April 3 at 8 P.M.
Saturday Matinee at 2 P.M.
Tickets on sale at the Lydia Mendelssohn box office
Friday and Saturday Evenings Sold Out

.5. KDA - ROD I

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-- - -- - ai

SUN\DAY

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INI
E
I a
E. I
i ThEopu uiu n ubigmse f"lqetpn
I I
I*I I
I IN
I 1
THE BANK DICIK
I I
I I
Also starring Una Merkel
E I
E E
E I
I The pompous furious and bumbling master of "eloquent pan-
I tomime" plays Egberg Souse, a man of innumerable roles, Loafer, a
E Barfly, Embezzler, Movie Director, Bank Cop-he unwittingly I
E! 1
catches the thief-and in the end, a Beloved Family Man and
"1
Respectable Millionarie! I
1 E
* This is the film which includes Fields' riotous "Great Chase"
scene, ten minutes of unmatchoble comedy.

1-

u,

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